Bacterial Contamination and Nano-Technological Solutions in Industry

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Antibiotics Use and Antimicrobial Stewardship".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 6618

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Chemistry Department, University of Bari Aldo Moro, Via E. Orabona 4, IT-70125 Bari, Italy
Interests: nanomaterials; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; electrochemistry; antimicrobials; sensors
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Institute of Nanotechnology, National Research Council (CNR-NANOTEC), Bari, Italy
Interests: cyto-compatibility; cell culture; light microscopy; plasma processes

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Guest Editor
Chemistry Department, University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, 70121 Bari, Italy
Interests: nanotechnology; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; infrared spectroscopy; electrochemistry; antimicrobials; transmission electron microscopy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bacterial contamination and subsequent infections are a major threat to human health. Fighting bacterial pollution in all the stages of industrial production has become of major importance, and it is of great importance to limit this threat, especially in all those cases where biofilms are produced, as common disinfectants are poorly effective in the cleaning and sterilization processes. Biofilms, in fact, are well-known for their resistance against harsh conditions and pharmacological treatments due to their three-dimensional structures comprising cells rooted in protective extracellular polymeric substances. Moreover, as a result of the misuses of antibiotics, the expansion of bacterial antibiotic resistance is a growing problem today. In this scenario, the use of nano-antimicrobials is a growing new approach against biofilm-mediated, drug-resistant, and recidivous infections. Since nanoparticles’ mode of action is the effect of simultaneous processes (production of reactive oxygen species, electrostatic interaction with the cell membrane, ion release, internalization, etc.), most of the resistance mechanisms occurring with classic antibiotics are irrelevant and ineffective in this case. This Special Issue aims at collecting papers about the application of nanotechnologies to fight and/or prevent bacterial infection in different industrial fields, ranging from automotive and public transports, to food and pharmaceutical productions, etc. Submissions about novel and green techniques for the production of nano-antimicrobials, and about new protocols for the modification of industrial manufacts with bioactive nanoparticles are encouraged, as well. Eventual nanotoxicological issues related to the implementation of nanophases in industrial fields may be explored, too.

Dr. Rosaria Anna PICCA
Dr. Roberto Gristina
Dr. Maria Chiara Sportelli
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • Nano-antimicrobials
  • bacterial contamination
  • biofilm
  • antimicrobial resistance
  • industry
  • nano-toxicity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3890 KiB  
Article
Synthesis of Metal-Loaded Carboxylated Biopolymers with Antibacterial Activity through Metal Subnanoparticle Incorporation
by Farzaneh Noori, Meriem Megoura, Marc-André Labelle, Mircea Alexandru Mateescu and Abdelkrim Azzouz
Antibiotics 2022, 11(4), 439; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11040439 - 24 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1888
Abstract
Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) loaded by highly dispersed metal subnanoparticles (MSNPs) showed antibacterial activity against E. coli and B. subtilis strains. Copper and silver were found to act in both cationic and zero-valence forms. The antibacterial activity depends on the [...] Read more.
Carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) loaded by highly dispersed metal subnanoparticles (MSNPs) showed antibacterial activity against E. coli and B. subtilis strains. Copper and silver were found to act in both cationic and zero-valence forms. The antibacterial activity depends on the metal species content but only up to a certain level. Silver cation (Ag+) showed higher antibacterial activity as compared to Ag0, which was, however, more effective than Cu0, due to weaker retention. The number of carboxyl groups of the biopolymers was found to govern the material dispersion in aqueous media, the metal retention strength and dispersion in the host-matrices. Cation and metal retention in both biopolymers was found to involve interactions with the oxygen atoms of both hydroxyl and carboxyl groups. There exists a ternary interdependence between the Zeta potential (ZP), pH induced by the biocidal agent and its particle size (PS). This interdependence is a key factor in the exchange processes with the surrounding species, including bacteria. Clay mineral incorporation was found to mitigate material dispersion, due to detrimental competitive clay:polymer interaction. This knowledge advancement opens promising prospects for manufacturing metal-loaded materials for biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Contamination and Nano-Technological Solutions in Industry)
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15 pages, 2309 KiB  
Article
Synthesis Monitoring, Characterization and Cleanup of Ag-Polydopamine Nanoparticles Used as Antibacterial Agents with Field-Flow Fractionation
by Valentina Marassi, Sonia Casolari, Silvia Panzavolta, Francesca Bonvicini, Giovanna Angela Gentilomi, Stefano Giordani, Andrea Zattoni, Pierluigi Reschiglian and Barbara Roda
Antibiotics 2022, 11(3), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11030358 - 8 Mar 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2000
Abstract
Advances in nanotechnology have opened up new horizons in nanomedicine through the synthesis of new composite nanomaterials able to tackle the growing drug resistance in bacterial strains. Among these, nanosilver antimicrobials sow promise for use in the treatment of bacterial infections. The use [...] Read more.
Advances in nanotechnology have opened up new horizons in nanomedicine through the synthesis of new composite nanomaterials able to tackle the growing drug resistance in bacterial strains. Among these, nanosilver antimicrobials sow promise for use in the treatment of bacterial infections. The use of polydopamine (PDA) as a biocompatible carrier for nanosilver is appealing; however, the synthesis and functionalization steps used to obtain Ag-PDA nanoparticles (NPs) are complex and require time-consuming cleanup processes. Post-synthesis treatment can also hinder the stability and applicability of the material, and dry, offline characterization is time-consuming and unrepresentative of real conditions. The optimization of Ag-PDA preparation and purification together with well-defined characterization are fundamental goals for the safe development of these new nanomaterials. In this paper, we show the use of field-flow fractionation with multi-angle light scattering and spectrophotometric detection to improve the synthesis and quality control of the production of Ag-PDA NPs. An ad hoc method was able to monitor particle growth in a TLC-like fashion; characterize the species obtained; and provide purified, isolated Ag-PDA nanoparticles, which proved to be biologically active as antibacterial agents, while achieving a short analysis time and being based on the use of green, cost-effective carriers such as water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Contamination and Nano-Technological Solutions in Industry)
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11 pages, 1887 KiB  
Article
A New Nanocomposite Packaging Based on LASiS-Generated AgNPs for the Preservation of Apple Juice
by Maria Chiara Sportelli, Antonio Ancona, Annalisa Volpe, Caterina Gaudiuso, Valentina Lavicita, Valerio Miceli, Amalia Conte, Matteo Alessandro Del Nobile and Nicola Cioffi
Antibiotics 2021, 10(7), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10070760 - 22 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1982
Abstract
Designing bioactive materials, with controlled metal ion release, exerting a significant biological action and associated to low toxicity for humans, is nowadays one of the most important challenges for our community. The most looked-for nanoantimicrobials are capable of releasing metal species with defined [...] Read more.
Designing bioactive materials, with controlled metal ion release, exerting a significant biological action and associated to low toxicity for humans, is nowadays one of the most important challenges for our community. The most looked-for nanoantimicrobials are capable of releasing metal species with defined kinetic profiles, either by slowing down or inhibiting bacterial growth and pathogenic microorganism diffusion. In this study, laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) has been used to produce bioactive Ag-based nanocolloids, in isopropyl alcohol, which can be used as water-insoluble nano-reservoirs in composite materials like poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate). Infrared spectroscopy was used to evaluate the chemical state of pristine polymer and final composite material, thus providing useful information about synthesis processes, as well as storage and processing conditions. Transmission electron microscopy was exploited to study the morphology of nano-colloids, along with UV-Vis for bulk chemical characterization, highlighting the presence of spheroidal particles with average diameter around 12 nm. Electro-thermal atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to investigate metal ion release from Ag-modified products, showing a maximum release around 60 ppb, which ensures an efficient antimicrobial activity, being much lower than what recommended by health institutions. Analytical spectroscopy results were matched with bioactivity tests carried out on target microorganisms of food spoilage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bacterial Contamination and Nano-Technological Solutions in Industry)
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