Anti-microbial Activity of Metabolites Isolated from Fungi

A special issue of Antibiotics (ISSN 2079-6382). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungi and Their Metabolites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 5430

Special Issue Editors


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Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica DISIT, Amedeo Avogadro University of Eastern Piedmont, Vercelli, Italy
Interests: natural products; fungi; plants; NMR; chiroptical properties; total synthesis; anti-insect activity; anti-bacterial activity

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Department of Sciences and Technological Innovation, University of Piemonte Orientale, viale T. Michel, 11-15121 Alessandria, Italy
Interests: soil microbial ecology; rhizosphere; plant–microbe interactions; PGPB
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dipartimento per lo Sviluppo Sostenibile e la Transizione Ecologica, Università del Piemonte Orientale, 13100 Vercelli, Italy
Interests: soil microbiome; gut microbiome; metaproteome; holobiont
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fungi are a noteworthy source of bioactive metabolites, but differently from plants, their metabolite contents have been much less investigated to this purpose. Several new molecules have been discovered in the past few years, but what is still missing is a systematic study of the active molecules synthesized by many taxonomic units. For instance, some genera belonging to phylum Basidiomycota, such as Cortinarius (>3000 species worldwide), Entoloma (>1500 species), Russula (>1000 species), Mycena (>700 species), and Inocybe (>500 species), have been only minimally investigated.

The inhibition of bacterial growth is a prominent property of several fungal compounds. Since the discovery of penicillin, more than 150 different antibiotics have been isolated and used for human therapy. However, bacteria developed resistance against most of these molecules, so that antimicrobial resistance is now one of the most concerning global threats for human health.

This Special Issue will address studies (including, e.g., original research, research perspectives, mini reviews, commentaries, and opinion papers) that focus on fungal metabolites from both mycelial broth culture and fruiting bodies, with a specific potential application for their antibiotic activity against bacterial and fungal human pathogens.

Dr. Marco Clericuzio
Dr. Elisa Gamalero
Dr. Elisa Bona
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Fungi
  • mycelia
  • fruiting bodies
  • metabolites
  • extraction
  • isolation
  • antibiotics
  • antifungal activity
  • Candida sp.
  • Pseudomonas sp.
  • Acinetobacter sp.
  • Klebsiella sp.
  • Antibiotic resistance
  • carbapenems
  • methycillin
  • colistin
  • azole

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 2744 KiB  
Article
A Soil-Isolated Streptomyces spororaveus Species Produces a High-Molecular-Weight Antibiotic AF1 against Fungi and Gram-Positive Bacteria
by Pu-Chieh Chang, Shao-Chung Liu, Ming-Chun Ho, Tzu-Wen Huang and Chih-Hung Huang
Antibiotics 2022, 11(5), 679; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics11050679 - 18 May 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2302
Abstract
The overuse of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance, not only in bacteria but also in fungi. Streptomyces are known to produce numerous secondary metabolites including clinically useful antibiotics. In this study, we screened for antibiotic-producing actinobacteria from soils in [...] Read more.
The overuse of antibiotics has resulted in the emergence of antibiotic resistance, not only in bacteria but also in fungi. Streptomyces are known to produce numerous secondary metabolites including clinically useful antibiotics. In this study, we screened for antibiotic-producing actinobacteria from soils in Taipei and discovered a Streptomyces strain SC26 that displayed antimicrobial activities against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi, but the compounds are heat-labile. Upon UV mutagenesis, a late-sporulation mutant SC263 was isolated with the same antibiotic spectrum but increased in thermostability. The nature of the antibiotic is not clear, but its activity was resistant to proteolytic, nucleolytic and pancreatic digestions, and was retained by the 100 kDa membrane during filtration. To gather more information on SC263, the genome was sequenced, which produced three contigs with a total of 8.2 Mb and was assigned to the species of Streptomyces spororaveus based on the average nucleotide identity to the reference species S. spororaveus NBRC 15456. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-microbial Activity of Metabolites Isolated from Fungi)
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12 pages, 2709 KiB  
Article
A Systematic Study of the Antibacterial Activity of Basidiomycota Crude Extracts
by Marco Clericuzio, Mattia Bivona, Elisa Gamalero, Elisa Bona, Giorgia Novello, Nadia Massa, Francesco Dovana, Emilio Marengo and Elisa Robotti
Antibiotics 2021, 10(11), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics10111424 - 21 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2174
Abstract
The excessive consumption of antibiotics in clinical, veterinary and agricultural fields has resulted in tremendous flow of antibiotics into the environment. This has led to enormous selective pressures driving the evolution of antimicrobial resistance genes in pathogenic and commensal bacteria. In this context, [...] Read more.
The excessive consumption of antibiotics in clinical, veterinary and agricultural fields has resulted in tremendous flow of antibiotics into the environment. This has led to enormous selective pressures driving the evolution of antimicrobial resistance genes in pathogenic and commensal bacteria. In this context, the World Health Organization (WHO) has promoted research aiming to develop medical features using natural products that are often competitive with synthetic drugs in clinical performance. Fungi are considered an important source of bioactive molecules, often effective against other fungi and/or bacteria, and thus are potential candidates in the search of new antibiotics. Fruiting bodies of sixteen different fungal species of Basidiomycota were collected in the Italian Alps. The identification of fungal species was performed through Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) sequencing. Most species belong to genera Cortinarius, Mycena and Ramaria, whose metabolite contents has been scarcely investigated so far. The crude extracts obtained from the above mushrooms were tested for their inhibition activity against five human pathogens: Candida albicans ATCC 14053, C. glabrata ATCC 15126, Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 6571, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883. Twelve crude extracts showed activity against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853. Highest activity was shown by some Cortinarius species, as C. nanceiensis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anti-microbial Activity of Metabolites Isolated from Fungi)
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