Exploring the Potential for Crop Productivity by Applying Novel Agrochemicals, including Fertilizers, Biochar, Biostimulants, and Plant Nutrition Regulators

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 1223

Special Issue Editors

State Key Laboratory of Efficient Utilization of Arid and Semi–Arid Arable Land in Northern China, Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: Fertilizer; Fertilization; Plant nutrition; Urea; Phosphorus fertilizer; Biostimulant; Biofortification; Plant-based food; Agrochemical; Soil health; Soil fertility
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj‐Napoca, Romania
Interests: pedo-amelioration and soil erosion control studies; analysis of variance (ANOVA); anti-erosion systems; carbon sequestration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The abundant supply of nutrients from fertilizers helps to ensure crop productivity. Agrochemists have dedicated themselves to developing and utilizing highly efficient agricultural chemicals to maximize crop yield with minimal nutrient input. The purpose of this Special Issue is to compile the latest advancements in highly efficient fertilizers, as well as substances/materials such as biochar, biostimulants, and plant nutrition regulators, that can enhance nutrient absorption and utilization when applied alone or in combination with common fertilizers. This Special Issue covers the characterization and identification of novel fertilizers/materials, their impacts on fertilizer nutrients, their behaviors in soil transportation, their transformation patterns within plants, their field performance including crop yield, and the underlying mechanisms of plant nutrition principles. Scientists from around the world are invited to submit their original research articles and review papers on advancements in the applications and mechanisms of innovative fertilizers and synergists to this Special Issue.

Dr. Meng Xu
Prof. Dr. Teodor Rusu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fertilizers
  • synergist
  • efficiency-enhanced material
  • biochar
  • biostimulants
  • plant nutrition regulator

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3203 KiB  
Article
Active Soil Organic Carbon Pools Decrease with Increased Time since Land-Use Transition from Rice Paddy Cultivation to Areca Nut Plantations under the Long-Term Application of Inorganic Fertilizer
by Yunxing Wan, Qilin Zhu, Lijun Liu, Shuirong Tang, Yanzheng Wu, Xiaoqian Dan, Lei Meng, Qiuxiang He, Ahmed S. Elrys and Jinbo Zhang
Agronomy 2024, 14(5), 946; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14050946 - 30 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Many croplands in the tropics of China have been converted over the last decades into areca nut plantations due to their high economic returns. This land-use transition was accompanied by changes in agricultural practices such as soil moisture regimes and fertilizer inputs, which [...] Read more.
Many croplands in the tropics of China have been converted over the last decades into areca nut plantations due to their high economic returns. This land-use transition was accompanied by changes in agricultural practices such as soil moisture regimes and fertilizer inputs, which may affect soil organic carbon (SOC) and its fractions, especially in tropical soils with low fertility and high nitrogen loss. Yet, how the time since land-use transition from rice paddy cultivation to areca nut plantations affects soil carbon dynamics and their underlying mechanisms in the tropics of China remains elusive. Here, areca nut plantation soils with different ages (2, 5, 10, 14, and 17 years) and paddy fields in the tropical region of China were investigated. The study result indicates that the contents of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), easily oxidized organic carbon (EOC), light organic carbon (LFOC), and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) decreased significantly with increased time since land-use transition from rice paddy cultivation to areca nut plantations. Similarly, the ratios of DOC/SOC, MBC/SOC, POC/SOC, LFOC/SOC, and EOC/SOC decreased significantly with increased time since land-use transition. Compared with the paddy soil, the carbon pool management index decreased by 36.6–76.7% under the areca nut plantations, concluding that increasing the time since land-use transition from rice paddy cultivation to areca nut plantations with high application rates of chemical fertilizers resulted in reduced soil active carbon fractions and SOC supply capacity. Therefore, agricultural practices such as the use of organic fertilizers should be applied to improve the soil’s ability to supply organic carbon in managed plantation ecosystems in the tropics of China. Full article
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23 pages, 2705 KiB  
Article
Yield, Protein Content and Water-Related Physiologies of Spring Wheat Affected by Fertilizer System and Weather Conditions
by Felicia Chețan, Diana Hirișcău, Teodor Rusu, Marius Bărdaș, Cornel Chețan, Alina Șimon and Paula Ioana Moraru
Agronomy 2024, 14(5), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14050921 - 27 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Technological and climatic factors significantly influence the expression of quality and quantity properties of spring wheat. This study aims to quantify the effects of weather conditions and fertilizer systems on spring wheat yield, quality (protein content), and physiological indicators (leaf vapor pressure deficit, [...] Read more.
Technological and climatic factors significantly influence the expression of quality and quantity properties of spring wheat. This study aims to quantify the effects of weather conditions and fertilizer systems on spring wheat yield, quality (protein content), and physiological indicators (leaf vapor pressure deficit, evapotranspiration, surface temperature of the flag leaf) and to identify a suitable spring wheat genotype for the Transylvanian Plain. The experimental factors were: Y represents the year (Y1, 2019; Y2, 2020); F represents the fertilizer variant (F1, a single rate of fertilization: 36 kg ha−1 of nitrogen; F2, two rates of fertilization: 36 kg ha−1 of nitrogen + 72 kg ha−1 of nitrogen; F3, two rates of fertilization: 36 kg ha−1 of nitrogen + 105 kg ha−1 of nitrogen); and S represents the genotype (S1, Pădureni; S2, Granny; S3, Triso; S4, Taisa; S5, Ciprian; and S6, Lennox). This multifactorial experiment with three factors was conducted on Phaeozem soil. Regardless of weather conditions, fertilization with N100–110 at the head swollen sheath (stage 10, Feeks Growth Scale for Wheat) is deemed the most suitable variant because it yields an average grain yield of 5000 kg ha−1 of good quality (13.84% protein) with a considerable flag leaf area (29 cm2) where physiological processes can optimally support the well-being of the spring wheat plants. Beyond this level of fertilization, the average grain yield tends to plateau, but the protein content considerably increases by 13–23%, depending on the genotype. High yields were achieved in the Lennox and Triso genotypes. Full article
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