Advances in Application Effects and Mechanisms of Fertilizer Products

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Soil and Plant Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1217

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009, China
Interests: soil fertility; soil nutrient cycling; controlled-release fertilizer; nitrogen fertilizer
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State Key Laboratory of Efficient Utilization of Arid and Semi–Arid Arable Land in Northern China, Key Laboratory of Plant Nutrition and Fertilizer, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: Fertilizer; Fertilization; Plant nutrition; Urea; Phosphorus fertilizer; Biostimulant; Biofortification; Plant-based food; Agrochemical; Soil health; Soil fertility
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fertilizers have been widely used to maximize both the quantity and quality of agricultural products. The excessive input and improper application of fertilizers, however, not only result in the wastage of valuable fertilizer resources and intangible assets but also contribute to environmental pollution and ecological imbalance. Since the establishment of mineral nutrition in the 1840s by Justus von Liebig, fertilizer products have continuously updated and upgraded to enhance the efficiency of fertilizer nutrient and application services. These innovations include coated fertilizers, controlled-release fertilizer, nano fertilizers, value-added fertilizers, smart fertilizers, biostimulants, and fertilizer additives. In addition, new fertilizer products have also been developed to meet the requirements in application technologies like fertilizer sprayers, spraying drones, no-tillage sowing-fertilizing machines, and integrated drip irrigation systems for water and fertilizer management. The latest advancements in the application and underlying mechanism of new fertilizer products present significant potential for optimizing the efficiency and sustainability of fertilizers for humans.

The bottom line: Better fertilizer, bigger harvest, more profits.

Dr. Wenhai Mi
Dr. Meng Xu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fertilizer
  • fertilizer effect
  • fertilizer tool
  • fertilizer sprayer
  • fertilizer use efficiency
  • fertilization
  • urea
  • ammonium phosphate
  • compound fertilizer
  • foliar fertilizer
  • value-added fertilizer
  • biostimulant
  • nano fertilizer
  • modified fertilizer
  • smart fertilizer

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

14 pages, 2423 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of N Transformation of Humic Acid Urea in Different Circle Layers of the Fertisphere: A Simulated Experiment
by Min Liu, Meng Xu, Liang Yuan, Shuiqin Zhang, Yanting Li and Bingqiang Zhao
Agronomy 2024, 14(1), 223; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy14010223 - 20 Jan 2024
Viewed by 798
Abstract
Due to its broad yield-increasing effect and low cost, humic acid urea (HAU) has become one of the leading modified fertilizers worldwide. The fertisphere is the primary space where urea (U) granules participate in the soil nitrogen cycle, forming a nutrient concentration gradient [...] Read more.
Due to its broad yield-increasing effect and low cost, humic acid urea (HAU) has become one of the leading modified fertilizers worldwide. The fertisphere is the primary space where urea (U) granules participate in the soil nitrogen cycle, forming a nutrient concentration gradient centered on the point of fertilization. The closer the circle layers to the urea granule in the fertisphere, the higher the nitrogen concentration. However, HAU in this microregion remains poorly understood. The differences in the transformation process from the inside to outside circle layers of the U and HAU fertispheres were simulated and studied using soil incubation experiments under 20, 10, 2, 1, and 0.2 g kg−1 nitrogen inputs. The 20 and 10 g kg−1 inputs represent the layers closest to the urea granule. Within the first seven days, HAU treatment showed higher concentrations of soil ammonia-N content than U treatment within the two layers closest to the fertilizer core, while exhibiting lower concentrations under the farthest two layers. Under 2 g kg−1 nitrogen input, the nitrate nitrogen under the HAU treatment was significantly higher than that in the U treatment, indicating a higher nitrification rate. During the 42-day incubation period, soil mineral nitrogen content under the HAU treatment was higher than that for the U treatment in the two closest circles. On the 42nd day, the residual urea-N under the HAU treatment was significantly higher than that for the U treatment when the nitrogen input was higher than 1 g kg−1. The effect of higher fertilizer preservation and supply capacity of HAU in Fluvo-aquic soil was achieved by changing the urease activity and nitrification rate in fertisphere ranges closer to the fertilizer core. An improved understanding of the high-efficiency mechanism of HAU in the fertisphere process will contribute to the development of new-generation high-efficiency urea products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Application Effects and Mechanisms of Fertilizer Products)
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