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The Nexus of Natural and Human-Made Capital in Environmental Crisis Management

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2021) | Viewed by 9090

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, 400000 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: environmental governance; sustainable consumption
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Guest Editor
Department of Hospitality Services, Faculty of Business, Babes-Bolyai University, 400038 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: consumer behavior; sustainable development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agriculture, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, Cluj‐Napoca, Romania
Interests: pedo-amelioration and soil erosion control studies; analysis of variance (ANOVA); anti-erosion systems; carbon sequestration
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Special Issue (SI) “The Nexus of Natural and Human-Made Capital in Environmental Crisis Management” will reveal complementarities between “natural capital" and “human capital”, and thus to disclose particular features of “strong sustainability”. There are certain functions that the environment performs and they cannot be duplicated by human-made capital. Those who advocate for “strong sustainability” (see, for example, Brand, 2009, Ekins et al. 2003, Neumayer, 2003, Pelenc et al. 2015, Shi et al. 2019) try to demonstrate that natural capital is a complex system based on evolving biotic and abiotic elements that interact in ways that determine the ecosystem capacity to provide humans with a wide array of services and functions. Moving away from the discourse on the substitutability between “natural capital” and “human-made capital”, the investigation of this interplay between natural and manufactured capital is central to this SI. Thus, “The Nexus of Natural and Human-Made Capital in Environmental Crisis Management” invites contributors, through their analytical approaches, to find answers to a wide variety of concerns such as “Is reconciliation between weak and strong sustainability possible?”, “How can we maintain or restore the natural capital to close the sustainability gap and what are the costs of so doing?” (as per Ekins et al. 2003), “What are the leverage points to align the circular economy to the strong sustainability philosophy?”, “What is the place of green consumption within strong sustainability?”, “What is the role of ethics of strong sustainability and stakeholders in sustainability science” (as per Dedeurwaerdere, 2014), among other questions. Central science questions and challenges of the social-ecological system in front of the multitude of environmental crisis facets demand science-based actions. Consequently, the Guest Editors aim to create a forum for discussion on sustainability science where an interdisciplinary reflection is needed and we hope to bring together social scientists, philosophers, engineers, agronomists, biologists, and other scientists to advance this debate.

References

  • Brand, F. (2009). Critical natural capital revisited: Ecological resilience and sustainable development. Ecological economics68(3), 605–612.
  • Dedeurwaerdere, T. (2014). Sustainability science for strong sustainability. Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Ekins, P., Simon, S., Deutsch, L., Folke, C., & De Groot, R. (2003). A framework for the practical application of the concepts of critical natural capital and strong sustainability. Ecological economics44(2–3), 165–185.
  • Neumayer, E. (2003). Weak versus strong sustainability: exploring the limits of two opposing paradigms. Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Pelenc, J., Ballet, J., & Dedeurwaerdere, T. (2015). Weak sustainability versus strong sustainability. Brief for GSDR United Nations.
  • Shi, L., Han, L., Yang, F., & Gao, L. (2019). The Evolution of Sustainable Development Theory: Types, Goals, and Research Prospects. Sustainability, 11(24), 7158.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ruxandra Malina Petrescu-Mag
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Dacinia Crina Petrescu
Prof. Dr. Teodor Rusu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Environmental pollution prevention, control, and research
  • Climate change adaptation
  • Climate-smart agriculture
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Smart cities
  • Environmental economics
  • Negotiation tactics and conflict resolution
  • Regulations and governance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 846 KiB  
Article
Drivers of Residents’ Home Composting Intention: Integrating the Theory of Planned Behavior, the Norm Activation Model, and the Moderating Role of Composting Knowledge
by Hamid Rastegari Kopaei, Mehdi Nooripoor, Ayatollah Karami, Ruxandra Malina Petrescu-Mag and Dacinia Crina Petrescu
Sustainability 2021, 13(12), 6826; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13126826 - 16 Jun 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 4264
Abstract
Home composting is judged as an effective municipal waste management option in which household contribution is essential, but it has a low adoption. The objectives of the study were to determine the factors that influence home composting intention and identify the moderating role [...] Read more.
Home composting is judged as an effective municipal waste management option in which household contribution is essential, but it has a low adoption. The objectives of the study were to determine the factors that influence home composting intention and identify the moderating role of composting knowledge in the model, using the combined model of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and norm activation model (NAM). A structured questionnaire was applied to a sample of 367 residents of Isfahan city, Iran, randomly selected. Data were analyzed using cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, PLS-SEM, and PLS-MGA. Cluster analysis grouped the three clusters based on the constructs of the integrated model, and this result was confirmed by discriminant analysis. Findings show that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavior control can predict the intention to compost. Study results confirmed the positive effect of awareness of the consequences of composting on ascribed responsibility to compost at home, of responsibility to the personal norm, and of the personal norm on intention to compost at home. Furthermore, it was observed that composting knowledge moderates the relationship between subjective norm and behavioral intention, and the one between perceived behavioral control and behavioral intention. The integrated model had more predictive power than the TPB model. The fit statistic of the integrated model was good and 71% of the variance for intention behavior toward home composting. The insights on factors affecting residents’ intention to compost obtained from this study can be used in measures and programs that reinforce and stimulate home composting. Full article
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15 pages, 1154 KiB  
Article
Traditional Foods at the Click of a Button: The Preference for the Online Purchase of Romanian Traditional Foods during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Ruxandra Malina Petrescu-Mag, Iris Vermeir, Dacinia Crina Petrescu, Florin Laurentiu Crista and Ioan Banatean-Dunea
Sustainability 2020, 12(23), 9956; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12239956 - 28 Nov 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 4022
Abstract
The 2020 quarantine demonstrated that online food purchase has become one of the main protagonists of the pandemic. The present study valued the Internet as a mediator between producers and consumers with the power to create new demand for Romanian traditional food during [...] Read more.
The 2020 quarantine demonstrated that online food purchase has become one of the main protagonists of the pandemic. The present study valued the Internet as a mediator between producers and consumers with the power to create new demand for Romanian traditional food during the COVID-19 crisis. Authors aimed at carrying out an exploratory research about the online purchase of traditional foods (TFs). Within this context, the study, firstly, outlines the meaning of traditional foods in the Romanian consumers’ minds and, secondly, it identifies the variables that can predict the preference for the online purchase of TFs during the COVID-19 pandemic. An online survey was carried out to investigate the Romanian consumers’ perceptions (n = 223) of TFs and online purchase of TFs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Binary logistic regression tested the relationship between the preference for the online purchase of TFS (vs. in-store) and seven perceived characteristics of TFs. Results show that the preference for the online purchase of TFs during the COVID-19 pandemic can be predicted by five variables—“TFs taste”; “Effect of TFs consumption on health during the COVID-19 pandemic”; “Effect of online TFs purchase on health during the COVID-19 pandemic”; “How cheap/expensive is to buy TFS online during the COVID-19 pandemic”; and “Easiness to purchase TFS online during the COVID-19 pandemic”. It was concluded that TFs have to claim their place within this digitized landscape by finding the balance between old and new, between preferences for foods taste passed through generations and new life lifestyles at 5G speed. Full article
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