Topic Editors

School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China
Prof. Dr. Deng Liu
State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China

Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology

Abstract submission deadline
closed (20 December 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
20 December 2024
Viewed by
4413

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental microorganisms play key roles in driving the biogeochemical cycles of different elements by catalyzing a large diversity of redox reactions and, thus, contribute greatly to maintaining environmental sustainability. They display highly diverse abilities to catalyze the synthesis, degradation, modification, mobilization, immobilization, oxidation, reduction, mineralization, and weathering of a vast number of different compounds. Therefore, environmental microorganisms have been widely used in bioengineering applications, such as bioremediation, bioleaching, water and groundwater treatment, biofuels, biosynthesis, metabolite production, biofertilizer, solid waste treatment, and wastewater treatment. This Special Issue on “Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology” will publish original research papers and comprehensive reviews about environmental microorganisms and their functions and applications in bioengineering. Topics for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Redox reactions catalyzed by environmental microorganisms and their roles in biogeochemical cycles. (b) Interactions between microbes and minerals. (c) The biodegradation and transformation of environmental contaminants, including organic and inorganic contaminants, as well as heavy metals. (d) The functional and genetic diversity of environmental microorganisms, revealed via laboratory experiments and metagenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses. (e) The bioremediation of soils, sediments, surface water, and groundwater. (f) The microbial treatment of solid waste and wastewater. (g) Biofertilizer and interactions between microbes and plants. (h) Extremophilic microorganisms: diversity and functions. (i) Microbial synthesis. (j) Engineered microorganisms.

Prof. Dr. Xian-Chun Zeng
Prof. Dr. Deng Liu
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • geomicrobiology
  • environmental microbe
  • redox reaction
  • heavy metal and metalloid pollution
  • microbial remediation
  • microbial diversity
  • bioreactor
  • bioengineering of environmental microbe,
  • biofilm
  • metagenomics

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Applied Microbiology
applmicrobiol
- - 2021 13.3 Days CHF 1000 Submit
Bioengineering
bioengineering
4.6 4.2 2014 17.7 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Biology
biology
4.2 4.0 2012 18.7 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Environments
environments
3.7 5.9 2014 23.7 Days CHF 1800 Submit
Microorganisms
microorganisms
4.5 6.4 2013 15.1 Days CHF 2700 Submit

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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16 pages, 2818 KiB  
Article
Red Claw Crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus Cultivation Influences the Dynamics and Assembly of Benthic Bacterial Communities in Paddy Fields
Environments 2023, 10(10), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments10100178 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 1326
Abstract
Red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus has emerged as a highly significant and suitable species to be raised in integrated rice–aquatic animal farming systems. To optimize an integrated aquaculture and agriculture (IAA) system and ensure sustainable utilization and development of land resources, an IAA [...] Read more.
Red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus has emerged as a highly significant and suitable species to be raised in integrated rice–aquatic animal farming systems. To optimize an integrated aquaculture and agriculture (IAA) system and ensure sustainable utilization and development of land resources, an IAA system combining rice cultivation with red claw crayfish culture was implemented to assess the impacts of rice–red claw crayfish co-culturing on the dynamics and assembly of bacterial communities in paddy soils. We established two experimental groups, each with eight replicates. We utilized 16S rRNA Illumina high-throughput sequencing to access the bacterial community composition and assembly in paddy soils. Red claw crayfish C. quadricarinatus cultivation did not significantly affect the alpha diversity of the bacterial community in the paddy field, but it obviously increased the relative abundances of the phyla Acidobacteriota and Pseudomonadota involved in organic matter degradation and nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon cycling. Red claw crayfish cultivation could lead to more complex bacterial communities, increased bacterial resistance to disturbances, the promotion of niche differentiation, and increased competition intensity between bacterial communities during the mid-cultivation period. Nitrogen emerged as a critical factor influencing the bacterial community composition in paddy soil during the culture period, and the red claw crayfish cultivation affected the bacterial community by altering the ammonia concentration in the paddy soil. As the culture progressed, the assembly of the bacterial community in the paddy soil was predominantly driven by stochastic processes, and red claw crayfish cultivation accelerated the evolution of the bacterial community assembly towards a stochastic process. Our study offers valuable insights into the dynamic changes occurring in the composition and assembly of bacterial communities in paddy soils in response to red claw crayfish cultivation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology)
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18 pages, 1389 KiB  
Review
Potential of Porous Substrate Bioreactors for Removal of Pollutants from Wastewater Using Microalgae
Bioengineering 2023, 10(10), 1173; https://doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering10101173 - 09 Oct 2023
Viewed by 910
Abstract
Porous substrate bioreactors (PSBRs) are a new technology to grow microalgae immobilized in a dense culture and solve some problems linked to suspended cultivation. During recent years, this technology has been used in laboratory and pilot setups in different fields of environmental biotechnology, [...] Read more.
Porous substrate bioreactors (PSBRs) are a new technology to grow microalgae immobilized in a dense culture and solve some problems linked to suspended cultivation. During recent years, this technology has been used in laboratory and pilot setups in different fields of environmental biotechnology, such as wastewater treatment. The aim of this short review is to introduce the PSBR technology, summarize the results obtained in removing some pollutants from wastewater, provide an assessment of the potential of PSBRs for wastewater treatment, and the subsequent use of the algal biomass for other purposes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology)
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17 pages, 3685 KiB  
Article
Microbial Consortium HJ-SH with Very High Degradation Efficiency of Phenanthrene
Microorganisms 2023, 11(10), 2383; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11102383 - 23 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 819
Abstract
Phenanthrene (PHE) is one of the model compounds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, a natural PHE-degrading microbial consortium, named HJ-SH, with very high degradation efficiency was isolated from soil exposed to long-term PHE contamination. The results of GC analysis showed [...] Read more.
Phenanthrene (PHE) is one of the model compounds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study, a natural PHE-degrading microbial consortium, named HJ-SH, with very high degradation efficiency was isolated from soil exposed to long-term PHE contamination. The results of GC analysis showed that the consortium HJ-SH degraded 98% of 100 mg/L PHE in 3 days and 93% of 1000 mg/L PHE in 5 days, an efficiency higher than that of any other natural consortia, and even most of the engineered strains and consortia reported so far. Seven dominating strains were isolated from the microbial consortium HJ-SH, named SH-1 to SH-7, which were identified according to morphological observation and 16S rDNA sequencing as Pseudomonas sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., Delftia sp., Pseudomonas sp., Brevundimonas sp., Curtobacterium sp., and Microbacterium sp., respectively. Among all the seven single strains, SH-4 showed the strongest PHE degradation ability, and had the biggest degradation contribution. However, it is very interesting that the microbial consortium can hold its high degradation ability only with the co-existence of all these seven single strains. Moreover, HJ-SH exhibited a very high tolerance for PHE, up to 4.5 g/L, and it can degrade some other typical organic pollutants such as biphenyl, anthracene, and n-hexadecane with the degradation ratios of 93%, 92% and 70%, respectively, under 100 mg/L initial concentration in 5 days. Then, we constructed an artificial consortium HJ-7 consisting of the seven single strains, SH-1 to SH-7. After comparing the degradation ratios, cell growth, and relative degradation rates, it was concluded that the artificial consortium HJ-7 with easier reproducibility, better application stability, and larger room for modification can largely replace the natural consortium HJ-SH. In conclusion, this research provided novel tools and new insights for the bioremediation of PHE and other typical organic pollutants using microbial consortia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology)
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11 pages, 959 KiB  
Article
Novel and Simple Method for Quantification of 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol with Microbial Conversion to 2,4,6-Trichloroanisole
Microorganisms 2023, 11(9), 2133; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11092133 - 23 Aug 2023
Viewed by 799
Abstract
Contamination with 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) often causes taste and odor (T&O) problems in drinking water due to its low odor threshold concentration. Microbial O-methylation of the precursor 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) would be the dominant mechanism for TCA formation. Simple and rapid measurement of TCP [...] Read more.
Contamination with 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) often causes taste and odor (T&O) problems in drinking water due to its low odor threshold concentration. Microbial O-methylation of the precursor 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) would be the dominant mechanism for TCA formation. Simple and rapid measurement of TCP in the low concentration range is necessary to control the problems induced by TCA. In this study, the combination of microbial conversion and instrumental analysis was proposed as a method of TCP quantification. Fungi and bacteria were isolated from various water samples and examined for their ability to produce TCA from TCP. As a result, a strain exhibiting quantitative TCA production and a high growth rate was obtained and named Mycolicibacterium sp. CB14. The conversion rate of TCP to TCA by this strain was found to be high and stable (85.9 ± 5.3%), regardless of the applied TCP concentration, although within the range of 0.1–10 µg/L. The limits of detection and quantification for TCP by this proposed method were determined to be 5.2 ng/L and 17.3 ng/L, respectively. By improving the methods, Mycolicibacterium sp. CB14 could be used for the quantification of TCP at very low concentration levels, which is sufficient to manage the T&O problem caused by TCA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Environmental Bioengineering and Geomicrobiology)
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