Topic Editors

Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Piazzale Vincenzo Tecchio 80, 80125 Naples, Italy
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, 80125 Naples, Italy

Building Physics and Sustainable Design of Transportation Systems

Abstract submission deadline
closed (31 October 2023)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (31 December 2023)
Viewed by
4623

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Buildings and transportation are the most energivorous sectors, and increasing the sustainability and energy efficiency of these systems is a key factor in reducing pollution. The development and implementation of innovative design criteria and the adoption of renewable-based technologies are promising solutions to promote green and environmentally friendly policies.

We would like to invite submissions of new research results, case studies and practices to this Topic in this interdisciplinary field in order to provide a common framework to authors from different research areas.

The Topics of interest for publication are the following:

  • Advanced envelope technologies and new materials;
  • Building Information Modelling and integrated design approaches;
  • District heating and cooling;
  • Electrical storage systems;
  • E-mobility;
  • Energy-efficient transportation systems;
  • Energy sustainability, resilience and climate adaptability of systems;
  • Heat pumps;
  • Heat recovery systems;
  • Natural, mechanical and hybrid ventilation;
  • Renewable energy systems and devices;
  • Smart buildings, districts and communities;
  • Solar heating and cooling;
  • Thermal energy storage technologies;
  • Vehicle-to-building and vehicle-to-grid.

Dr. Giovanni Barone
Dr. Cesare Forzano
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • dynamic simulation modelling
  • energy storage
  • energy conversion
  • renewable energy
  • power generation
  • energy management
  • power systems
  • power electronics
  • power converters
  • smart grids
  • electrical vehicles
  • batteries
  • supercapacitors
  • fuel cells
  • electrical machines and drives
  • testing and modeling

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Buildings
buildings
3.8 3.1 2011 14.6 Days CHF 2600
CivilEng
civileng
- 2.0 2020 37.7 Days CHF 1200
Energies
energies
3.2 5.5 2008 16.1 Days CHF 2600
Sustainability
sustainability
3.9 5.8 2009 18.8 Days CHF 2400
Solar
solar
- - 2021 16.9 Days CHF 1000

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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17 pages, 7496 KiB  
Article
Construction and Electrothermal Performance Evaluation of a Solar-Powered Emergency Shelter
Energies 2024, 17(1), 118; https://doi.org/10.3390/en17010118 - 25 Dec 2023
Viewed by 434
Abstract
Power outages and poor thermal conditions are common in emergency shelters. In light of this, a novel design for a solar-powered emergency shelter (SPES) with flexible photovoltaics is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, the space and structure of SPES are designed [...] Read more.
Power outages and poor thermal conditions are common in emergency shelters. In light of this, a novel design for a solar-powered emergency shelter (SPES) with flexible photovoltaics is proposed and investigated in this paper. Firstly, the space and structure of SPES are designed based on ergonomic and easy open-and-close requirements. Then, considering the finishing strength of the building and the convenience and economy of the processing design, the construction of solid models using a 1:2 equal scale, and three double-top SPES were developed, in which internal roofs are canvas, polyethylene(PE), and polyvinyl chloride(PVC). Finally, measurements and ANSYS-Fluent simulations are employed for testing the dynamic fluctuation of the electrothermal performance of SPES. It is found that the maximum differences between the inner roof interior side temperature (IRIST) and the outdoor ambient environment temperature (OAET) for Sref, Dsc, Dpe, and Dpvc are 33.3 °C, 32.9 °C, 28.1 °C, and 25.9 °C, respectively, in winter conditions in China cold zone. The optimized design parameters of SPES in Poso City, Indonesia, characterized by equatorial humid climatic conditions, recommended that the air interlayer be 0.2 meters thick and the exhaust air volume be 0.3 m3/s. Mechanical ventilation coupled with evaporative conditioners can further reduce indoor temperatures effectively. This research offers a novel solution to the problems of indoor thermal environments and power outages for post-disaster resettlement. Full article
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18 pages, 884 KiB  
Article
Homeowners’ Perceptions of Renewable Energy and Market Value of Sustainable Buildings
Energies 2023, 16(10), 4178; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16104178 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1443
Abstract
Growing concerns over environmental issues and sustainable living have resulted in increased interest in renewable energy and energy efficiency. The real estate market is no exception, with homeowners increasingly considering the market value of green and sustainable buildings, which can offer both energy [...] Read more.
Growing concerns over environmental issues and sustainable living have resulted in increased interest in renewable energy and energy efficiency. The real estate market is no exception, with homeowners increasingly considering the market value of green and sustainable buildings, which can offer both energy efficiency and potential health benefits. This study investigates the level of interest among homeowners in investing in renewable energy sources and energy efficiency measures for their homes and how it relates to their perception of the market value of green or sustainable buildings in the real estate market. A survey was conducted in the Paphos urban complex in Cyprus, with 180 participants over the age of 18. The participants were selected through a random sampling method and were representative of the general population in terms of gender, age, and income. Data were collected on their attitudes towards renewable energy sources and energy efficiency, as well as their perceptions of the market value of green buildings. The data collected were analyzed using various statistical methods, including Cronbach’s α coefficient, the non-parametric Friedman test, descriptive statistics, and factor analysis, with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) being used for coding and analysis. Results indicate that 64% of the homeowners surveyed were interested in investing in renewable energy sources, and 72% were interested in energy efficiency measures. Additionally, findings suggest a moderate level of interest (58%) among homeowners in investing in renewable energy sources and that this is positively associated with their perception of the market value of green buildings. Furthermore, homeowners with higher income and education levels tend to be more interested in investing in renewable energy sources and energy efficiency measures and perceive green buildings as having higher market value. This study provides insights into the factors that drive homeowners’ investment in renewable energy sources and energy efficiency measures, shedding light on the relationship between homeowners’ perceptions of the market value of green buildings and their interest in such investments. Full article
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17 pages, 4159 KiB  
Article
Effects of the Ground Reinforcement on the Dynamic Behaviors of Compacted Loess Embankment with Ballasted Track
Buildings 2023, 13(4), 860; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings13040860 - 24 Mar 2023
Viewed by 767
Abstract
An embankment is needed to satisfy the requirements for the longitudinal slope of railway lines, and ground reinforcement is also generally required in loess regions. The present study attempted to understand the effects of different ground reinforcement measures on the dynamic characteristics of [...] Read more.
An embankment is needed to satisfy the requirements for the longitudinal slope of railway lines, and ground reinforcement is also generally required in loess regions. The present study attempted to understand the effects of different ground reinforcement measures on the dynamic characteristics of a track–embankment–ground system. To this end, the critical speeds and the distributions of dynamic stress and environmental vibration were analyzed using a 2.5D finite element method. Three typical ground reinforcements, including dynamic compaction ground (DCG), soil–cement compacted pile composite ground (SCG) and CFG pile composite ground (CFGG), were used. The results indicate that the train speed (critical speed I) at which the maximum vertical displacement of the track occurs is universally higher than that (critical speed II) at which the wave propagation phenomenon occurs. The lower boundary limit of the peak region in the dispersion relationship can be selected as the reference value of critical speed II. Moreover, the values of critical speed I obtained using the DCG, SCG and CFGG models were around 92, 105 and 127 m/s, respectively. For critical speed II, the values were 75, 80 and 115 m/s. Once the train speed exceeded critical speed II, the vibration was confined to the embankment in the CFGG model, as evidenced by the isolation of the wave propagation from the embankment to the ground as well as the increasing dynamic stress in the embankment. After reinforcement, the dynamic stress, dynamic influence depth (DID), critical speed and resonant frequency increased. Additionally, the DID stayed around the 3–6 m range at all speeds. Full article
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25 pages, 3449 KiB  
Article
Working with Different Building Energy Performance Tools: From Input Data to Energy and Indoor Temperature Predictions
Energies 2023, 16(2), 743; https://doi.org/10.3390/en16020743 - 09 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1190
Abstract
Energy consumption calculations and thermal comfort conditions assessment are crucial issues in building simulations when using Building Energy Performance Simulation (BEPS) tools. The available software has been separately validated under different boundaries and operating conditions. Consequently, the predicted output of the same building [...] Read more.
Energy consumption calculations and thermal comfort conditions assessment are crucial issues in building simulations when using Building Energy Performance Simulation (BEPS) tools. The available software has been separately validated under different boundaries and operating conditions. Consequently, the predicted output of the same building simulated with two separate software can disagree. This issue is relevant not only for research purposes but also for professionals who need to compare the energy performance of the same building with different simulation engines. This work aims at contributing to the field in two ways. Above all, it clarifies the preparation of the building model and the correct definition of input data and boundary conditions when different software are used (IDA ICE and Design Builder/Energy Plus). In addition, it compares the output (energy and indoor temperatures) of two BEPS for the same building (in different configurations) exposed to the same weather conditions. The study shows that the two most significant differences are represented by the temperature values, while the energy predictions agree. Full article
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