Topic Editors

Department of Animal Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Akademicka St. 12, 20-950 Lublin, Poland
Prof. Dr. Beata Łebkowska-Wieruszewska
Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences, Akademicka 12 St., 20-033 Lublin, Poland
Dr. Tomasz Szponder
Department and Clinic of Animal Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
Sub-Department of Pathophysiology, Department of Preclinical Veterinary Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Life Sciences, Akademicka 12, 20-033 Lublin, Poland

Animal Diseases in Agricultural Production Systems, 2nd Edition

Abstract submission deadline
31 October 2024
Manuscript submission deadline
31 December 2024
Viewed by
2543

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The focus of the Topic is on diseases in farm animals and companion animals, encompassing not only orthopaedic and surgical aspects but also addressing issues related to pathophysiological mechanisms, treatment, and pharmacology. The aim of the topic is to adopt a holistic approach to animal health, considering both diagnosis and effective therapeutic strategies.

The Topic delves into the pathophysiological mechanisms of various diseases in animals, aiming to better understand their origin and development. Additionally, contributions that explore the development of diagnostic methods for early disease detection and effective therapeutic intervention planning are highly encouraged.

The Topic extends beyond surgery and orthopaedics to encompass various aspects of treatment, including the utilization of modern pharmacological methods. Research on different pharmaceutical substances and their impact on animal health, with the goal of seeking innovative therapeutic solutions, is a key focus of the Topic.

Additionally, the Topic includes the potential application of natural and synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMP) in animals as therapeutics and in  feed industry.

The Topic's interests span a wide range of veterinary fields, integrating knowledge from surgery, pathophysiology, and pharmacology to effectively combat animal diseases and enhance their overall health, especially in such important problems as osteomyelitis and intraoperative infections.

Within this Topic, experimental studies are also published, with the primary aim of delving into the pathomechanisms associated with various health issues in animals. The research encompasses areas focused on improving the overall health status of animals, with a specific emphasis on supplements, additives, and innovative solutions in this field.

Prof. Dr. Ewa Tomaszewska
Prof. Dr. Beata Łebkowska-Wieruszewska
Dr. Tomasz Szponder
Dr. Joanna Wessely-Szponder
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • animal diseases
  • veterinary medicine
  • orthopaedic and surgical aspects
  • pathophysiological mechanisms
  • early disease detection
  • pharmacological methods
  • pharmaceutical substances
  • animal health
  • overall health status
  • supplements
  • additives
  • animal pathomechanisms
  • antimicrobial peptides
  • immunomodulation
  • growth performance

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Agriculture
agriculture
3.6 3.6 2011 17.7 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Animals
animals
3.0 4.2 2011 18.1 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Veterinary Sciences
vetsci
2.4 2.3 2014 19.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Antibiotics
antibiotics
4.8 5.5 2012 13.7 Days CHF 2900 Submit
Zoonotic Diseases
zoonoticdis
- - 2021 27.6 Days CHF 1000 Submit

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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13 pages, 3215 KiB  
Article
The In Vitro Effects of Carprofen on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neutrophil Extracellular Trap Formation in Dairy Cows
by Jianbo Zhi, Kaixi Qiao, Lei Xie, Osvaldo Bogado Pascottini, Geert Opsomer and Qiang Dong
Animals 2024, 14(6), 985; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14060985 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 575
Abstract
The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model that mimics inflammatory reactions and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in dairy cows. This model was used to examine the effect of carprofen (CA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to develop an in vitro model that mimics inflammatory reactions and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) formation by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) in dairy cows. This model was used to examine the effect of carprofen (CA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NETs formation and expression of inflammatory factors. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 24 Holstein cows (3–11 days postpartum) and PMNs were isolated. In three replicates, PMNs were exposed to various treatments to establish an appropriate in vitro model, including 80 μg/mL of LPS for 2 h, followed by co-incubation for 1 h with 60 μmol/L CA and 80 μg/mL LPS. The effects of these treatments were evaluated by assessing NETs formation by extracellular DNA release, gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and the expression of NETs-related proteins, including histone3 (H3), citrullinated histone (Cit-H3), cathepsin G (CG), and peptidyl arginine deiminase 4 (PAD4). The assessment of these parameters would elucidate the specific mechanism by which CA inhibits the formation of NETs through the PAD4 pathway instead of modulating the Nox2 pathway. This highlights CA’s effect on chromatin decondensation during NETs formation. Statistical analyses were performed utilizing one-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction. The results demonstrated that LPS led to an elevated formation of NETs, while CA mitigated most of these effects, concurrent the PAD4 protein level increased with LPS stimulating and decreased after CA administration. Nevertheless, the intracellular levels of ROS did not change under the presence of LPS. LPS supplementation resulted in an upregulation of H3 and Cit-H3 protein expression levels. Conversely, the CA administration inhibited their expression. Additionally, there was no change in the expression of CG with either LPS or LPS + CA co-stimulation. The gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor -α, interleukin (IL)-18, IL-1β, and IL-6) upregulated with LPS stimulation, while the treatment with CA inhibited this phenomenon. In conclusion, CA demonstrated a pronounced inhibitory effect on both LPS-induced NETs formation as well as the associated inflammatory response. Full article
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17 pages, 1408 KiB  
Review
The Complex Interplay of Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Inflammation in Transition Dairy Cows
by Kaixi Qiao, Renjiao Jiang, Genaro Andres Contreras, Lei Xie, Osvaldo Bogado Pascottini, Geert Opsomer and Qiang Dong
Animals 2024, 14(6), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14060832 - 08 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1069
Abstract
During the transition period, dairy cows exhibit heightened energy requirements to sustain fetal growth and lactogenesis. The mammary gland and the growing fetus increase their demand for glucose, leading to the mobilization of lipids to support the function of tissues that can use [...] Read more.
During the transition period, dairy cows exhibit heightened energy requirements to sustain fetal growth and lactogenesis. The mammary gland and the growing fetus increase their demand for glucose, leading to the mobilization of lipids to support the function of tissues that can use fatty acids as energy substrates. These physiological adaptations lead to negative energy balance, metabolic inflammation, and transient insulin resistance (IR), processes that are part of the normal homeorhetic adaptations related to parturition and subsequent lactation. Insulin resistance is characterized by a reduced biological response of insulin-sensitive tissues to normal physiological concentrations of insulin. Metabolic inflammation is characterized by a chronic, low-level inflammatory state that is strongly associated with metabolic disorders. The relationship between IR and metabolic inflammation in transitioning cows is intricate and mutually influential. On one hand, IR may play a role in the initiation of metabolic inflammation by promoting lipolysis in adipose tissue and increasing the release of free fatty acids. Metabolic inflammation, conversely, triggers inflammatory signaling pathways by pro-inflammatory cytokines, thereby leading to impaired insulin signaling. The interaction of these factors results in a harmful cycle in which IR and metabolic inflammation mutually reinforce each other. This article offers a comprehensive review of recent advancements in the research on IR, metabolic inflammation, and their intricate interrelationship. The text delves into multiple facets of physiological regulation, pathogenesis, and their consequent impacts. Full article
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12 pages, 538 KiB  
Communication
Equine Asthma Does Not Affect Circulating Myostatin Concentrations in Horses
by Sylwester Kowalik, Maisie O’reilly, Artur Niedźwiedź and Witold Kędzierski
Animals 2024, 14(5), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14050799 - 04 Mar 2024
Viewed by 511
Abstract
(1) Background: The number of horses suffering from chronic respiratory diseases, resembling human asthma, is increasing but there is still a lack of reliable and accurate methods to detect these disorders. Numerous studies have found elevated plasma concentrations of one of the myokines, [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The number of horses suffering from chronic respiratory diseases, resembling human asthma, is increasing but there is still a lack of reliable and accurate methods to detect these disorders. Numerous studies have found elevated plasma concentrations of one of the myokines, namely, myostatin (MSTN), in people suffering from severe asthma. MSTN normally inhibits myoblast proliferation and differentiation through autocrine or paracrine signals. Therefore, given the pathogenesis of asthma, we hypothesize that MSTN could be a useful biomarker of equine asthma. Thus, this study aimed to compare the concentration of MSTN in the blood plasma of fully healthy and asthmatic horses. (2) Methods: A total of 61 horses were clinically examined to confirm or exclude the occurrence of equine asthma, including bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid cytology performed on 49 horses. This study included three groups of horses, two of which were clinically healthy, and one of which was asthmatic. (3) Results: The mean circulatory MSTN concentration determined using the ELISA method in asthmatic horses was significantly higher than that in clinically healthy young Thoroughbred racehorses (p < 0.05), but it did not differ as compared to the group of healthy, adult leisure horses. (4) Conclusions: The obtained results did not unambiguously support our original hypothesis that MSTM may be a reliable marker for the early diagnosis of equine asthma. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to analyze the plasma MSTN concentration in equine asthma patients, and therefore further studies are needed to confirm our novel findings. Full article
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