Topic Editors

Department of Physiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University Complutense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Department of Animal Physiology, Veterinary Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Animal and Veterinary Research Centre (CECAV), University of Trás-Os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal

Application of Animal Models: From Physiology to Pathology

Abstract submission deadline
20 October 2025
Manuscript submission deadline
20 December 2025
Viewed by
1306

Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

The main objective of this topic is to study the alterations of the different functions of the human body in order to understand the reason for the appearance of various diseases. In other words, it seeks the keys to understand how imbalances in physiological processes lead to a series of pathological changes, such as alterations in the functions of organs or tissues or the activation of certain cellular processes. The appearance of a disease may be subject to genetic or environmental factors or to the lifestyle of each person. Therefore, this topic is responsible for analyzing all types of genetic mutations associated with complex conditions, as well as the reason why certain environmental factors may aggravate the disease. In this way, new treatments can be developed to address these pathological processes or even to develop early detection programs to prevent the emergence of diseases such as diabetes. In addition, this topic can be of great use for the development of animal or cellular models in biomedical research. ‘From Physiology to Pathology’ covers the following fields:

  • Helps to understand disease patterns: pathophysiologist, physicians and scientists can investigate and understand how diseases originate and how they can affect the human body.
  • It facilitates the development of specific treatments: this branch of study is very useful to create new specific drugs to help reduce the symptoms of diseases.
  • It is useful for preventing the onset of diseases: once the pathological mechanisms are understood, multiple conditions can be prevented, since the knowledge of the causes provide us with the information for preventing disease development.
  • It allows the development of animal and cellular models to study diseases: biomedical research also benefits those working in pathophysiology and as a result, animal and cellular models can be developed for the study of diseases in laboratories.
  • It helps to personalize medical care: as we have seen above, pathophysiology allows us to understand the causes that lead to the development of different conditions. In the case of a particular patient, physicians can plan specific treatments to treat their disease in a personalized way.

Dr. Juan Carlos Illera del Portal
Dr. Sara Cáceres Ramos
Dr. Felisbina Luisa Queiroga
Topic Editors

Keywords

  • physiology
  • pathology
  • disease
  • treatment
  • animal model
  • biochemistry
  • cellular processes
  • therapy

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Animals
animals
3.0 4.2 2011 18.1 Days CHF 2400 Submit
Cells
cells
6.0 9.0 2012 16.6 Days CHF 2700 Submit
Life
life
3.2 2.7 2011 17.5 Days CHF 2600 Submit
Veterinary Sciences
vetsci
2.4 2.3 2014 19.6 Days CHF 2600 Submit

Preprints.org is a multidiscipline platform providing preprint service that is dedicated to sharing your research from the start and empowering your research journey.

MDPI Topics is cooperating with Preprints.org and has built a direct connection between MDPI journals and Preprints.org. Authors are encouraged to enjoy the benefits by posting a preprint at Preprints.org prior to publication:

  1. Immediately share your ideas ahead of publication and establish your research priority;
  2. Protect your idea from being stolen with this time-stamped preprint article;
  3. Enhance the exposure and impact of your research;
  4. Receive feedback from your peers in advance;
  5. Have it indexed in Web of Science (Preprint Citation Index), Google Scholar, Crossref, SHARE, PrePubMed, Scilit and Europe PMC.

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Journals
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
17 pages, 6779 KiB  
Article
Production of Proliferation- and Differentiation-Competent Porcine Myoblasts for Preclinical Studies in a Porcine Large Animal Model of Muscular Insufficiency
Life 2024, 14(2), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14020212 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 438
Abstract
Muscular insufficiency is observed in many conditions after injury, chronic inflammation, and especially in elderly populations. Causative cell therapies for muscle deficiencies are not state of the art. Animal models to study the therapy efficacy are, therefore, needed. We developed an improved protocol [...] Read more.
Muscular insufficiency is observed in many conditions after injury, chronic inflammation, and especially in elderly populations. Causative cell therapies for muscle deficiencies are not state of the art. Animal models to study the therapy efficacy are, therefore, needed. We developed an improved protocol to produce myoblasts suitable for pre-clinical muscle therapy studies in a large animal model. Myoblasts were isolated from the striated muscle, expanded by employing five different protocols, and characterized on transcript and protein expression levels to determine procedures that yielded optimized regeneration-competent myoblasts and multi-nucleated myotubes. We report that swine skeletal myoblasts proliferated well under improved conditions without signs of cellular senescence, and expressed significant levels of myogenic markers including Pax7, MyoD1, Myf5, MyoG, Des, Myf6, CD56 (p ≤ 0.05 each). Upon terminal differentiation, myoblasts ceased proliferation and generated multi-nucleated myotubes. Injection of such myoblasts into the urethral sphincter complex of pigs with sphincter muscle insufficiency yielded an enhanced functional regeneration of this muscle (81.54% of initial level) when compared to the spontaneous regeneration in the sham controls without myoblast injection (67.03% of initial level). We conclude that the optimized production of porcine myoblasts yields cells that seem suitable for preclinical studies of cell therapy in a porcine large animal model of muscle insufficiency. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 1821 KiB  
Article
Development of an Alternative In Vitro Rumen Fermentation Prediction Model
Animals 2024, 14(2), 289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani14020289 - 17 Jan 2024
Viewed by 537
Abstract
The aim of this study is to identify an alternative approach for simulating the in vitro fermentation and quantifying the production of rumen methane and rumen acetic acid during the rumen fermentation process with different total mixed rations. In this experiment, dietary nutrient [...] Read more.
The aim of this study is to identify an alternative approach for simulating the in vitro fermentation and quantifying the production of rumen methane and rumen acetic acid during the rumen fermentation process with different total mixed rations. In this experiment, dietary nutrient compositions (neutral detergent fiber (NDF), acid detergent fiber (ADF), crude protein (CP), and dry matter (DM)) were selected as input parameters to establish three prediction models for rumen fermentation parameters (methane and acetic acid): an artificial neural network model, a genetic algorithm-bp model, and a support vector machine model. The research findings show that the three models had similar simulation results that aligned with the measured data trends (R2 ≥ 0.83). Additionally, the root mean square errors (RMSEs) were ≤1.85 mL/g in the rumen methane model and ≤2.248 mmol/L in the rumen acetic acid model. Finally, this study also demonstrates the models’ capacity for generalization through an independent verification experiment, as they effectively predicted outcomes even when significant trial factors were manipulated. These results suggest that machine learning-based in vitro rumen models can serve as a valuable tool for quantifying rumen fermentation parameters, guiding the optimization of dietary structures for dairy cows, rapidly screening methane-reducing feed options, and enhancing feeding efficiency. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop