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New Food Waste Horizons

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2023) | Viewed by 19076

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Food Safety and Quality Management Department, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Belgrade, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: food sustainability; food safety and quality; life cycle assessment of food; environmental footprints in the food supply chain; sustainable diets; sustainable food production; food modeling
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Guest Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

At present, both academia and food industry emphasize the necessity to combat food waste and losses throughout the food supply chain. To perform such a task, scientific manuscripts, various stakeholders, and good environmental practices show a variety of different approaches. Top-down models downscale the problem from a policy-making point of view, emphasizing the need to reduce food waste, food insecurity, and hunger through different food systems. Vice versa, bottom-up approaches upscale food waste problems through the development of different waste treatment technologies and finding ways to develop value-added products focused on specific food actors in the food supply chain and different food sectors. There is also aim to map potential improvements in food production chains, to reduce CO2 emissions. Therefore, to be in line with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) by 2030, a good approach is to provide an overview of different case studies.

The aims and the scope of this Special Issue are to attract research papers related to various scenarios in decreasing food waste throughout the food supply chain perspective, both top-down and bottom-up and to especially welcome case studies and review articles that describe the current state of the art dealing with food waste.

Potential topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Food waste mitigation scenarios;
  • Food waste case studies;
  • New approaches in processing food waste;
  • Models for quantifying food waste value chain;
  • Food waste and losses and UN SDGs;
  • Food waste–food security–food hunger nexus;
  • Sustainable diets and food waste;
  • Food waste and sustainable production;

Food and environmental law in decreasing food waste.

Prof. Dr. Ilija Djekic
Prof. Dr. Anet Režek Jambrak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food waste mitigation
  • UN SDGs
  • 2030 Agenda
  • life cycle assessment
  • food waste modeling
  • food waste scenario

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 1951 KiB  
Article
Socioeconomic Impacts of Food Waste Reduction in the European Union
by Vidas Lekavičius, Viktorija Bobinaitė, Daina Kliaugaitė and Kristina Rimkūnaitė
Sustainability 2023, 15(13), 10151; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151310151 - 26 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1939
Abstract
Food waste is a global multidimensional problem, with economic, social, and environmental dimensions linked to sustainable development. This study analyses the socio-economic and pollution effects of reducing food waste in the European Union. The food waste reduction scenarios analysed cover all segments of [...] Read more.
Food waste is a global multidimensional problem, with economic, social, and environmental dimensions linked to sustainable development. This study analyses the socio-economic and pollution effects of reducing food waste in the European Union. The food waste reduction scenarios analysed cover all segments of the supply chain from primary production to household consumption. Using the economy-wide model SAMmodEU, the impact of the scenarios is analysed in the context of the whole economy. Most scenarios analysed demonstrate positive socioeconomic effects in terms of a slight increase in gross domestic product and increasing employment. The multicriteria analysis indicates that the best overall performance is achieved by reducing food waste in the foodservice. It is recommended to focus on behaviour in policy design, thereby reducing food waste both in food services and in households and ensuring positive socioeconomic impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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18 pages, 2726 KiB  
Article
Sustainable Ultrasound Assisted Extractions and Valorization of Coffee Silver Skin (CS)
by Vedran Biondić Fučkar, Marinela Nutrizio, Anamarija Grudenić, Ilija Djekić and Anet Režek Jambrak
Sustainability 2023, 15(10), 8198; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15108198 - 18 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1106
Abstract
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) encourage the efficient use of sustainable technologies. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is one of the extraction process techniques, which are also directed towards sustainability as a goal. Coffee silver skin (CS), being a healthy raw material as well as [...] Read more.
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) encourage the efficient use of sustainable technologies. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) is one of the extraction process techniques, which are also directed towards sustainability as a goal. Coffee silver skin (CS), being a healthy raw material as well as a waste, could be utilized in the manufacturing process of new dietary products. The goal of this research was to isolate proteins and polyphenols from CS using UAE and to employ spectrophotometry to determine the yields. Three parts of the research were conducted: ultrasonic extraction, the optimization of UAE conditions for the isolation of proteins and polyphenols from CS, and the analysis of the amino acid extract obtained with the optimal use of UAE. According to the results, it was reported that the highest yields of total polyphenols isolated from the CS using UAE were obtained by applying an amplitude of 75% and a time interval of 9 min. The optimal parameters of UAE, when considering the proportions of total polyphenols and proteins, are an amplitude of 100% and a time of 9 min. The most abundant amino acids in isolated proteins (Asp, Glu, Pro, Gly, and Ala) were defined as well. Based on the use of energy, it was obvious that UAE is a promising technology. This concurs with the proposed practice that when non-thermal technologies are analyzed from an environmental point of view, the first common denominator is the use of electricity to run the equipment, in relation to resource depletion. As expected, CS poses a great waste to be recycled, being a nutritionally rich raw material with great potential. Quantitative consideration on the environmentally friendly applicability of CS in mass production should be carried out to validate the entire process of developing a new product from both economic and environmental aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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14 pages, 1583 KiB  
Article
Sustainability Assessment of Food-Waste-Reduction Measures by Converting Surplus Food into Processed Food Products for Human Consumption
by Friederike Lehn and Thomas Schmidt
Sustainability 2023, 15(1), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15010635 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2652
Abstract
Food waste is a major challenge for society as it causes economic, environmental and social problems. Many food-waste-reduction measures aim to prevent food waste at the source or by redistributing surplus food via donation. However, it would also be useful to evaluate surplus-food [...] Read more.
Food waste is a major challenge for society as it causes economic, environmental and social problems. Many food-waste-reduction measures aim to prevent food waste at the source or by redistributing surplus food via donation. However, it would also be useful to evaluate surplus-food redistribution, where surplus food can be made available for human consumption by valorization (recycling). This paper evaluates food-waste-reduction measures, where surplus food is converted into processed food products for human consumption, which are then sold in a German retail store. The objective is to assess whether this kind of recycling of surplus food is effective in reducing food waste and how sustainable it is considering the economic, environmental and social impacts. The results of this pilot study show a total reduction of 19 kg of food waste within 17 weeks. Furthermore, all products were economically profitable, with a per product net revenue of sold upcycled products between EUR 0.42 and 0.70. The results of the environmental assessment varied from savings of 1.55 kg of CO2 equivalents/kg of product to the addition of 1.88 kg of CO2 equivalents/kg of product in product carbon footprint and the addition of between 0.42 and 0.70 mPt/kg of product in product environmental footprint. The social indicators could only be qualitatively described. The results, therefore, can only recommend this recycling option as an effective and efficient food-waste-reduction measure under optimal conditions. More research is needed to describe different recycling situations and to therefore improve the sustainability of the food supply chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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18 pages, 1117 KiB  
Article
Are Consumers Aware of Sustainability Aspects Related to Edible Insects? Results from a Study Involving 14 Countries
by Raquel P. F. Guiné, Sofia G. Florença, Ofélia Anjos, Nada M. Boustani, Cristina Chuck-Hernández, Marijana Matek Sarić, Manuela Ferreira, Cristina A. Costa, Elena Bartkiene, Ana P. Cardoso, Monica Tarcea, Paula M. R. Correia, Sofia Campos, Maria Papageorgiou, Daniel Abarquero Camino, Malgorzata Korzeniowska, Maša Černelič-Bizjak, Zanda Kruma, Emel Damarli, Vanessa Ferreira and Ilija Djekicadd Show full author list remove Hide full author list
Sustainability 2022, 14(21), 14125; https://doi.org/10.3390/su142114125 - 29 Oct 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3287
Abstract
In recent years, edible insects have been suggested as an alternative food that is more sustainable compared with other sources of animal protein. However, knowledge about the sustainability aspects associated with this source of food may play a role in convincing consumers to [...] Read more.
In recent years, edible insects have been suggested as an alternative food that is more sustainable compared with other sources of animal protein. However, knowledge about the sustainability aspects associated with this source of food may play a role in convincing consumers to adopt insects as part of their diet. In this context, the present study investigated the level of knowledge about the sustainability of edible insects in a group of people originating from 14 countries, with some naturally entomophagous and others not. To measure the knowledge, 11 items were selected and the scores obtained were tested with statistical tools (t-test for independent samples, analysis of variance—ANOVA) to search for differences according to sociodemographic and socioeconomic characteristics, geographical origin, and consumption habits of edible insects. The obtained results showed that, in general, knowledge is moderate, with the values of the average scores for the 11 items investigated ranging from 0.23 ± 0.99 to 0.66 ± 1.02, on a scale ranging from −2 (=very low knowledge) to 2 (=very high knowledge). The highest scores were found for items relating to the lower use of animal feed and lower emission of greenhouse gases required for the production of insects compared with beef. When investigating the differences between groups of participants, significant differences were generally found, revealing a trend for higher knowledge among males and young adults, for participants residing in urban areas and in countries such as Spain, Mexico, and Poland, and for participants with higher education levels and higher incomes. When testing the influence of consumption variables on the level of knowledge, the results showed a higher knowledge for participants who had already consumed insects or are willing to consume them. Finally, it was observed that higher knowledge was found for participants whose motivation to consume insects related to curiosity, a wish to preserve the planet, the gastronomic characteristics of insects, and their nutritional value. In conclusion, these results clearly indicate a very marked influence of a number of variables on the knowledge about the sustainability of edible insects, and this may be helpful to delineate strategies to effectively raise knowledge and eventually increase the willingness to consider insects as a more sustainable alternative to partially replace other protein foods, even in countries where this is a not a traditional practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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Review

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28 pages, 421 KiB  
Review
The Use of Biologically Converted Agricultural Byproducts in Chicken Nutrition
by Sebsib Ababor, Metekia Tamiru, Ashraf Alkhtib, Jane Wamatu, Chala G. Kuyu, Tilahun A. Teka, Lemlem Arega Terefe and Emily Burton
Sustainability 2023, 15(19), 14562; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151914562 - 07 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1785
Abstract
This article aims to uncover the current knowledge on using bioconverted agricultural byproducts in the chicken diet and the impact of these byproducts on performance, product quality, and health status. Agricultural and agro-industrial activities generate thousands of tons of byproducts. Converting these agricultural [...] Read more.
This article aims to uncover the current knowledge on using bioconverted agricultural byproducts in the chicken diet and the impact of these byproducts on performance, product quality, and health status. Agricultural and agro-industrial activities generate thousands of tons of byproducts. Converting these agricultural byproducts into valuable entities would be an environmentally friendly, sustainable, and viable part of byproduct management. Upon recycling to make new products, the process contributes to socio-economic value and maintaining environmental health and paves the way for realizing energy security and a circular economy. The current paper identifies that solid-state fermentation has attracted more research attention than other fermentation counterparts because it requires minimal moisture, good oxygen availability, cheap media, low wastewater generation, low cost, a low processing scheme, low energy demand, and high productivity. This paper illustrates the role of proteolytic and lignin-degrading enzymes present in bacteria and fungi in the bioconversion process of complex polymers into smaller molecules of amino acids and simple sugar with a profound improvement in the palatability and bioavailability of agricultural products. In addition, the paper gives more detailed insights into using bioconverted agricultural products in chickens to improve performance, product quality, gut microbiota and morphology, and chicken welfare. In conclusion, the bioconversion of agricultural byproducts is an encouraging endeavor that should be supported by governments, research centers, universities, and non-governmental entities to improve the productivity of animal source foods by ensuring environmental sustainability and expanding food security efforts for national development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
12 pages, 1264 KiB  
Review
Food Waste Originated Material as an Alternative Substrate Used for the Cultivation of Oyster Mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus): A Review
by Ana Doroški, Anita Klaus, Anet Režek Jambrak and Ilija Djekic
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12509; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912509 - 30 Sep 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4613
Abstract
Pleurotus ostreatus (P. ostreatus) is considered a high-quality food, rich in proteins and bioactive compounds important for maintaining human health. Lately, a commonly used substrate for oyster mushroom cultivation—wheat straw, is more often replaced by alternative cellulose substrates originated from the [...] Read more.
Pleurotus ostreatus (P. ostreatus) is considered a high-quality food, rich in proteins and bioactive compounds important for maintaining human health. Lately, a commonly used substrate for oyster mushroom cultivation—wheat straw, is more often replaced by alternative cellulose substrates originated from the agricultural and food industry. Utilization of wastes for mushroom cultivation has its added value: sustainable food waste management, production of high-quality food from low quality waste, as well as solving environmental, economic and global issues. This overview covered three categories of food waste: food-processing wastes, agro-cereal wastes and nut–fruit wastes, the most used for the cultivation P. ostreatus in the period of 2017–2022. Analyzed studies mostly covered the productivity and chemical characterization of the substrate before and after the cultivation process, as well as the morphological characteristics of the fruiting bodies cultivated on a specific substrate. Chemical analyses of mushrooms cultivated on food waste are not adequately covered, which gives room for additional research, considering the influence of substrate type and chemical quality on the fruiting bodies chemical composition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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21 pages, 984 KiB  
Review
From Chestnut Tree (Castanea sativa) to Flour and Foods: A Systematic Review of the Main Criticalities and Control Strategies towards the Relaunch of Chestnut Production Chain
by Chiara Aglietti, Alessio Cappelli and Annalisa Andreani
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12181; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912181 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2436
Abstract
Castanea sativa plays a key role in different production chains (timber, flour, honey, and tannins). Moreover, considering the great importance of chestnuts and chestnut flour for the food industry and for the subsistence of piedmont communities, a relaunch of this production chain is [...] Read more.
Castanea sativa plays a key role in different production chains (timber, flour, honey, and tannins). Moreover, considering the great importance of chestnuts and chestnut flour for the food industry and for the subsistence of piedmont communities, a relaunch of this production chain is definitely essential, thus motivating this review. The first aim of this literature overview is to summarize current knowledge regarding the main criticalities in chestnut tree cultivation, chestnut processing, and in chestnut flour production. The second aim is to suggest specific improvement strategies to contrast the main pests and diseases affecting chestnut trees, improve chestnut processing and flour production, and, finally, valorize all by-products generated by this production chain. With respect to chestnut trees, it is essential to develop specific integrated strategies based on early detection and management to contrast known and emerging issues. With regard to chestnut drying and flour production, particular attention needs to be paid to molds and mycotoxins which definitely represent the main criticalities. In addition, further investigations are needed to improve the dying process in both traditional and modern dry kilns, and to develop innovative drying processes. Finally, to face the monumental challenge of environmental sustainability, the valorization of the whole chestnut by-products is crucial. This review clearly highlighted that the recovery of polyphenols from chestnut by-products is the most interesting, sustainable, and profitable strategy. However, the fungal fermentation or the incorporation of little amounts of these by-products into foods seems a very interesting alternative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Food Waste Horizons)
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