Special Issue "Standards and Assessment of Construction Products"

A special issue of Standards (ISSN 2305-6703). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Standards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 4085

Special Issue Editor

Research and Development Center, Atlas sp. z o.o., 2, Kilinskiego St., 91-421 Lodz, Poland
Interests: assessment and verification of the constancy of performance (AVCP) of construction products; sustainable development in construction; construction products
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Standards set out specifications and other technical information concerning various kinds of products. Products placed on the market or put into service must meet certain requirements. We immediately realize their obviousness and indisputability by reading the sentences mentioned earlier. Products and standards are related, but many complex processes performed by various market stakeholders are going on between them. When we talk about construction products the situation becomes even more complicated, considering that:

  • An enormous variety of construction products is used in civil engineering;
  • There is a huge construction products market, and all its stakeholders should be prepared for continuous technological evolution;
  • Construction products are specific, and very often non-end-use products, e.g., water, added to the product, mixed, and used appropriately, are subject to assessment;
  • Construction products are assessed at different levels of micro- and macrostructure;
  • Various tests are performed to evaluate construction products, including not only mechanical and physical measurements but also functional and application tests;
  • The testing of construction products requires non-destructive and destructive measurement methods;
  • The testing of construction products is inextricably linked with variability resulting from the uncertainty of measurements;
  • Due to this uncertainty there is always a risk of incorrect assessment, i.e., the product assessed as compliant may be non-compliant, and the product rejected as non-compliant may, in fact, be compliant;
  • When assessing many construction products, one should remember probability, and, in this aspect, consider the values resulting from laboratory tests;
  • Construction products are subject to assessment by market surveillance authorities;
  • For each manufacturer, placing a construction product on the market is associated with risk, including a negative assessment of their product in tests ordered by market surveillance authorities;
  • There are possible situations in which the manufacturer has correctly assessed and verified the constancy of performance (AVCP) of their construction product, and the re-assessment by the market surveillance authorities, based on laboratory tests, is negative.

Considering the conditions and thinking mentioned above, as well as those not mentioned, that standards provide a common technical language that manufacturers should use to express the technical performance of their construction products, the weight of standards is fundamental. The exact importance of standards is for regulators expressing their requirements and designers, contractors, public authorities, and other construction product market actors willing to exchange information efficiently.

Construction product assessment is a complex, challenging, and not always fully defined issue. It is perceived differently by different stakeholders of the construction product market, especially by industry, academia, and regulators. A Special Issue of Standards dedicated to evaluating construction products is important, and I invite everyone interested in assessing construction products to publish in this Special Issue of Standards.

Dr. Jacek Michalak
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Standards is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Influence of the Concrete Block on the Tile Adhesive Strength Measured According to EN 12004
Standards 2023, 3(2), 169-176; https://doi.org/10.3390/standards3020013 - 16 May 2023
Viewed by 907
Abstract
Ceramic tile adhesives (CTA) are playing a dominant role for the business of dry-mix producers. Their quality is classified according to EN 12004. In addition, this standard describes the procedure of a CTA’s performance evaluation. Therefore, a defined ceramic tile, a concrete substrate, [...] Read more.
Ceramic tile adhesives (CTA) are playing a dominant role for the business of dry-mix producers. Their quality is classified according to EN 12004. In addition, this standard describes the procedure of a CTA’s performance evaluation. Therefore, a defined ceramic tile, a concrete substrate, and the actual tile adhesive is required. In our study, we investigated the influence of different concrete slabs on the results of two tile adhesives. In two cases, the influence of an additional thermal storage of the concrete slabs was evaluated. The tests were strictly performed according to EN 12004-2:2017. The highest variation for the same tile adhesive was found for the adhesion after heat storage measured on different concrete substrates. With a higher polymer content the influence tended to level out. Additionally, a significant deviation was observed for the adhesion strength after water storage, even causing a lower CTA classification on one substrate. The results of our investigation show that the quality of concrete slabs and their storage conditions should be seriously considered in comparing the performance of tile adhesive according to EN 12004. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Standards and Assessment of Construction Products)
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Article
Does Standardisation Ensure a Reliable Assessment of the Performance of Construction Products?
Standards 2022, 2(3), 260-275; https://doi.org/10.3390/standards2030019 - 24 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1319
Abstract
The implementation of a standard should be preceded by research work aimed at developing the test method, particularly in validation experiments. Is it actually so? Numerous experiences of producers and labs and an increasing number of scientific works prove the opposite. It turns [...] Read more.
The implementation of a standard should be preceded by research work aimed at developing the test method, particularly in validation experiments. Is it actually so? Numerous experiences of producers and labs and an increasing number of scientific works prove the opposite. It turns out that some standard methods are very poorly suited to assessing the performance of construction products. This is related both to the specificity of the methods and the tested products. This article presents some product assessment problems and the risk of using test methods that have not been fully validated. The risk seems relatively low if laboratories account for their own uncertainty. However, in some cases, additional components that both laboratories and product manufacturers might fail to consider can significantly increase the risk. This indicates the need for continuous work in the reference area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Standards and Assessment of Construction Products)
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Article
Ensuring the Validity of the Results by Participating in ILC Schemes—Case Study: The Determination of the Water-Soluble Chromium (VI) Content of Cement
Standards 2022, 2(2), 202-208; https://doi.org/10.3390/standards2020015 - 01 Jun 2022
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Abstract
The paper presents the mode in which an accredited laboratory, according to SR EN ISO/IEC 17025, monitors its performance by comparing the results with the results of other laboratories. This article aims to analyse the results of the participation of an accredited laboratory [...] Read more.
The paper presents the mode in which an accredited laboratory, according to SR EN ISO/IEC 17025, monitors its performance by comparing the results with the results of other laboratories. This article aims to analyse the results of the participation of an accredited laboratory in two ILC schemes, one organized in France and the other in Romania, on cement, discussing only the results of the determinations of the water-soluble hexavalent chromium content. Although chromium (VI) is not present in large amounts in cement, it is responsible for allergic reactions on the skin of workers. Thus, in EU countries, the maximum amount of water-soluble Cr (VI) in bagged cement or in the products based on cement is limited to a maximum of 0.0002% by mass of cement. The Chromium (VI) results obtained by the lab must meet the requirements of the standard SR EN 196-10 for the repeatability and, where appropriate, the reproducibility. Questions about the validity of the results arise when the laboratory obtains satisfactory results in the ILC scheme, but the standard deviation of the scheme is higher than that recommended in the standard method. The elements of the novelty of this paper are the interpretation of water-soluble Cr (VI) results and the use of information obtained from participating in interlaboratory testing schemes tom improve the validity of laboratory results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Standards and Assessment of Construction Products)
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