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Special Issue "New Challenges in Solar Radiation, Modeling and Remote Sensing II"

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmospheric Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2023 | Viewed by 2862

Special Issue Editors

Photovoltaic Solar Energy Unity (Renewable Energy Division) CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: solar radiation; atmospheric physics; solar systems modeling; radiative transfer; remote sensing; solar power plant performance
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Remote Sensing Technology Institute, German Aerospace Center (DLR), 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
Interests: radiative transfer; invariant imbedding; discrete ordinate method; synthetic iterations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface solar radiation is of vital importance for life on Earth, radiation–energy balance, photosynthesis and photochemical reactions, meteorological and climatic conditions, and the water cycle. Solar radiation is the most abundant renewable energy resource and, therefore, the demands for environmentally clean energy solutions and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions have shifted global interest toward the exploitation of solar energy for sustainable development in meeting electricity demands. Solar radiation measurements are necessary in the assessment of potential solar energy resources, while their scarce spatial coverage renders solar radiation modeling and remote sensing necessary for atmospheric and energy applications. The recent applications in broadening the penetration of solar systems have given rise to new demands and challenges in modeling solar radiation and regarding the availability of new and better solar radiation products. Solar cadasters or the modeling of solar radiation with complex topology (rear surface of bifacial PV systems), for instance, are just two specific examples of numerous topics. This Special Issue aims to review recent developments in obtaining solar radiation measurements of higher quality and modeling (solar radiation networks, historical developments, technique comparisons, and standard comparisons between models) and remote sensing using satellite and advanced statistical techniques such as artificial neural networks for solar radiation and energy mapping from regional to global scales. Satellite remote sensing of solar radiation provides better spatial coverage, and various methods have been developed for this, with the main disadvantages being the increased uncertainties and requirements for validation using ground-based measurements or modeling data.

This Special Issue is the second edition of Special Issue: New Challenges in Solar Radiation, Modeling and Remote Sensing. Experts and scholars in related fields are welcome to submit their original works to this Special Issue.

Dr. Jesús Polo
Dr. Dmitry Efremenko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solar radiation
  • models and techniques
  • solar cadasters
  • remote sensing
  • modeling solar radiation with complex topology
  • radiative forcing
  • solar dimming/brightening
  • PV systems
  • solar radiation/energy mapping

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 9179 KiB  
Article
Real-Time Terrain Correction of Satellite Imagery-Based Solar Irradiance Maps Using Precomputed Data and Memory Optimization
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(16), 3965; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15163965 - 10 Aug 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 594
Abstract
Satellite imagery-based solar irradiance mapping studies are essential for large-scale solar energy assessments but are limited in spatial resolution and accuracy. Despite efforts to increase map resolution by correcting inaccuracies caused by shadows on the terrain, the computational time of these models and [...] Read more.
Satellite imagery-based solar irradiance mapping studies are essential for large-scale solar energy assessments but are limited in spatial resolution and accuracy. Despite efforts to increase map resolution by correcting inaccuracies caused by shadows on the terrain, the computational time of these models and the massive volume of generated data still pose challenges. Particularly, forecasting generates large amounts of time series data, and the data production rate is faster than the computational speed of traditional terrain correction. Moreover, while previous research has been conducted to expedite computations, a novel and innovative technology in terrain correction is still required. Therefore, we propose a new correction method that can bypass complex calculations and process enormous data within seconds. This model extends the lookup table concept, optimizes the results of many shadow operations, and stores them in memory for use. The model enabled 90 m scale computations across Korea within seconds on a local desktop computer. Optimization was performed based on domain knowledge to reduce the required memory to a realistic level. A quantitative analysis of computation time was also conducted, revealing a previously overlooked computational bottleneck. In conclusion, the developed model enables real-time terrain correction and subsequent processing of massive amounts of data. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Solar Radiation, Modeling and Remote Sensing II)
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20 pages, 3124 KiB  
Article
The SOLAR-HRS New High-Resolution Solar Spectra for Disk-Integrated, Disk-Center, and Intermediate Cases
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(14), 3560; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15143560 - 15 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1241
Abstract
The solar spectrum at the top of the atmosphere contains crucial data for solar physics, astronomy, and geophysics. Accurately determining high-resolution solar reference spectra, whether they are disk-integrated, disk-center, or intermediate cases, represents a new challenge and is of primary importance for all [...] Read more.
The solar spectrum at the top of the atmosphere contains crucial data for solar physics, astronomy, and geophysics. Accurately determining high-resolution solar reference spectra, whether they are disk-integrated, disk-center, or intermediate cases, represents a new challenge and is of primary importance for all applications where spectral solar radiation needs to be evaluated. These spectra are also essential for interpreting remote sensing measurements that rely on sunlight, such as those obtained by Earth observation satellites or spacecraft exploring other planets. This paper lays a foundation for the implementation of multiple new solar irradiance reference spectra that have high resolution and are representative of solar minimum conditions. We developed the SOLAR high-resolution extraterrestrial reference spectra (SOLAR-HRS disk-integrated spectra) by normalizing high-spectral-resolution solar line data to the absolute irradiance scale of the SOLAR-ISS reference spectrum. The resulting one-of-a-kind SOLAR-HRS disk-integrated spectrum has a spectral resolution varying between 0.001 and 1 nm in the 0.5–4400 nm wavelength range. We also implemented a new high-resolution solar spectrum at the disk-center, covering a range of 650–4400 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.001 to 0.02 nm. We further expanded our analysis by producing several solar spectra for ten different solar view angles ranging from μ = 0.9 to μ = 0.05 (SOLAR-HRS intermediate cases). Finally, we developed new Merged Parallelised Simplified ATLAS spectra (MPS-ATLAS) based on solar modeling with Kurucz and Vald3 solar linelists for both the disk-integrated and disk-center spectra. One of the objectives of implementing all these new solar spectra is to fulfill the requirements of the MicroCarb space mission, which focuses on measuring greenhouse gas emissions. The solar data of this study are openly available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Solar Radiation, Modeling and Remote Sensing II)
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25 pages, 9624 KiB  
Article
Diurnal Cycle in Surface Incident Solar Radiation Characterized by CERES Satellite Retrieval
by and
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(13), 3217; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15133217 - 21 Jun 2023
Viewed by 821
Abstract
Surface incident solar radiation (Rs) plays an important role in climate change on Earth. Recently, the use of satellite-retrieved datasets to obtain global-scale Rs with high spatial and temporal resolutions has become an indispensable tool for research in related [...] Read more.
Surface incident solar radiation (Rs) plays an important role in climate change on Earth. Recently, the use of satellite-retrieved datasets to obtain global-scale Rs with high spatial and temporal resolutions has become an indispensable tool for research in related fields. Many studies were carried out for Rs evaluation based on the monthly satellite retrievals; however, few evaluations have been performed on their diurnal variation in Rs. This study used independently widely distributed ground-based data from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) to evaluate hourly Rs from the Clouds and the Earth’s Radiant Energy System Synoptic (CERES) SYN1deg–1Hour product through a detrended standardization process. Furthermore, we explored the influence of cloud cover and aerosols on the diurnal variation in Rs. We found that CERES-retrieved Rs performs better at midday than at 7:00–9:00 and 15:00–17:00. For spatial distribution, CERES-retrieved Rs performs better over the continent than over the island/coast and polar regions. The Bias, MAB and RMSE in CERES-retrieved Rs under clear-sky conditions are rather small, although the correlation coefficients are slightly lower than those under overcast-sky conditions from 9:00 to 15:00. In addition, the range in Rs bias caused by cloud cover is 1.97–5.38%, which is significantly larger than 0.31–2.52% by AOD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Solar Radiation, Modeling and Remote Sensing II)
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