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Feature Papers of Section “Atmospheric Remote Sensing” (Second Edition)

A special issue of Remote Sensing (ISSN 2072-4292). This special issue belongs to the section "Atmospheric Remote Sensing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2024 | Viewed by 1280

Special Issue Editors

German Research Centre for Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
Interests: cloud remote sensing; aerosol remote sensing; trace gas remote sensing; snow remote sensing; radiative transfer
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Remote Sensing Technology Institute, German Aerospace Center (DLR), 82234 Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany
Interests: radiative transfer; invariant imbedding; discrete ordinate method; synthetic iterations
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric remote sensing is an important branch of the modern remote sensing of our planet. The terrestrial atmosphere is composed of various atmospheric gases, particulate matter, water, ice, and mixed clouds. The monitoring of atmospheric composition using various techniques important for environmental studies, climate research, aerosol–trace gases-cloud interaction studies and hazard (smoke, dust storms, volcanic explosions, ozone holes, etc.) warnings.

This Special Issue is the second volume of the Issue “Feature Papers for Atmospheric Remote Sensing”. On the basis of the previous research results, this volume aims to present recent advances in atmospheric remote sensing derived from ground-based and spaceborne observations.

Papers related to the following topics are welcome:

  • Atmospheric radiative transfer;
  • Remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol;
  • Remote sensing of trace gases including CO2, O3, CH4, SO2, and NO2;
  • Remote sensing of terrestrial clouds;
  • Remote sensing of precipitation;
  • Precipitable water vapor retrieval techniques;
  • Study of aerosol–trace gases–clouds interactions;
  • Inversion theory;
  • Machine learning approach for atmospheric retrieval;
  • Validation of geophysical products.

Dr. Alexander Kokhanovsky
Dr. Dmitry Efremenko
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Remote Sensing is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • terrestrial atmosphere
  • remote sensing
  • atmospheric aerosol
  • trace gases
  • clouds
  • precipitation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 3151 KiB  
Communication
High Precision Measurements of Resonance Frequency of Ozone Rotational Transition J = 61,5–60,6 in the Real Atmosphere
Remote Sens. 2023, 15(9), 2259; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs15092259 - 25 Apr 2023
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Ground-based passive measurements of downwelling atmospheric radiation at ~110.836 GHz allow extracting the spectra of ozone self-radiation (rotational transition J = 61,5–60,6) coming from the low stratosphere–mesosphere and retrieving vertical profiles of ozone concentration at these altitudes. There is [...] Read more.
Ground-based passive measurements of downwelling atmospheric radiation at ~110.836 GHz allow extracting the spectra of ozone self-radiation (rotational transition J = 61,5–60,6) coming from the low stratosphere–mesosphere and retrieving vertical profiles of ozone concentration at these altitudes. There is a notable (several hundred kHz) ambiguity in the determination of the resonance frequency of this important ozone line. We carried out long-term ground-based measurements of atmospheric microwave radiation in this range using upgraded apparatus with high technical accuracy and spectral resolution (~12 kHz). The obtained brightness temperature spectra allowed us to determine the frequency of this ozone line to be 110,835.909 ± 0.016 MHz. We verified that the Doppler frequency shift by horizontal wind as well as the variations of the tropospheric absorption had little effect on the obtained result. The found value was 131 ± 16 kHz less than that measured in the laboratory and differed from modern model calculations. At the same time, it was close to the results of early semiempirical calculations made more than 40 years ago. The applications where precise knowledge about the resonance frequency of this ozone line can be important were discussed in this paper. Full article
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