Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles Design for Biomedical and Environmental Applications

A special issue of Processes (ISSN 2227-9717). This special issue belongs to the section "Particle Processes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2023) | Viewed by 6585

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Science and Technological Innovation, University of Eastern Piedmont, Via T. Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria, Italy
Interests: synthesis and characterization of multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles with paramagnetic and luminescent properties; preparation of porous and layered materials for diagnostic and theranostic applications; design and characterization of paramagnetic and luminescent metal complexes
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Guest Editor
Department of Science and Technological Innovation, University of Eastern Piedmont, 1920133 Milano, Italy
Interests: development of innovative materials for the catalytic abatement of toxic molecules; novel catalysts for green processes; optimization of porous sorbents for CO2 capture and/or water decontamination; novel materials for the production of energy through processes with low environmental impact; preparation of inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic additives for polymer nanocomposites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inorganic nanoparticles functionalized with different organic and inorganic nanoentities have sparked increasing interest in the research community and industry. In the last decade, several synthetic strategies based on hydrothermal reactions, sol–gel processes, coprecipitation methods, and the post-synthesis approaches necessary to decorate the surface of the final nanoparticles have been optimized. Depending on the functionalization process, these systems have been used in different fields, from catalysis to biomedical and environmental applications. This themed Special Issue aims to promote the most recent contributions related to the optimized synthesis of multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles bearing in the structure paramagnetic centers, luminescent entities, and organic–inorganic functionalities. Contributions demonstrating the use of these nanosystems for diagnostic and theranostic applications and for environmental purposes, with particular attention paid to the removal of metal and organic pollutants from different matrices, are also welcome.

Dr. Fabio Carniato
Dr. Chiara Bisio
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • inorganic nanoparticles
  • multifunctional materials
  • biomedical applications
  • environmental field

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 1846 KiB  
Article
Studying the Antioxidant and the Antimicrobial Activities of Leaf Successive Extracts Compared to the Green-Chemically Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles and the Crude Aqueous Extract from Azadirachta indica
by Mostafa Ahmed, Diaa Attia Marrez, Nadia Mohamed Abdelmoeen, Ebtesam Abdelmoneem Mahmoud, Mohamed Abdel-Shakur Ali, Kincső Decsi and Zoltán Tóth
Processes 2023, 11(6), 1644; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11061644 - 27 May 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4175
Abstract
Azadirachta indica has several medicinal uses, especially its leaves. Over 4000 years ago, Ayurvedic medicine used it for its therapeutic benefits. This study examined the biological activity of Neem crude extracts and green-chemically produced Ag-NPs. TPCs and TFCs were measured for polyphenolic burden [...] Read more.
Azadirachta indica has several medicinal uses, especially its leaves. Over 4000 years ago, Ayurvedic medicine used it for its therapeutic benefits. This study examined the biological activity of Neem crude extracts and green-chemically produced Ag-NPs. TPCs and TFCs were measured for polyphenolic burden in consecutive extracts. DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP experiments measured antioxidant and antimicrobial activity against seven strains of food-borne pathogenic bacteria and eight mycotoxigenic fungi. At 1000 μg/mL, ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Neem leaves had 80.10% and 69.41% in DPPH and 71.42% and 74.61% in ABTS assays for the antioxidant activity, compared to 93.58% for BHT. At 800 μg/mL, both extracts showed antioxidant activity with 57.52 and 57.87 μM in the FRAP assay, compared to 139.97 μM for Ascorbic acid. Both extracts demonstrated antimicrobial activity with 0.02 to 0.35 mg/mL as antibacterials, 0.03 to 2.17 mg/mL as antifungals, and 0.04 to 0.42 mg/mL as antibacterials. Compared to Neem crude extract, Neem Ag-NPs had the lowest MIC values as antibacterials and antifungals at 0.05 to 0.07 mg/mL and 0.07 to 0.20 mg/mL, respectively. Neem Ag-NPs and crude extract boost antioxidant and antibacterial properties. Full article
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13 pages, 2882 KiB  
Article
Magnesium Spinel Ferrites Development for FDM 3D-Printing Material for Microwave Absorption
by Vladimir Buzko, Sergey Ivanin, Alexander Goryachko, Ivan Shutkin, Polina Pushankina and Iliya Petriev
Processes 2023, 11(1), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/pr11010060 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1778
Abstract
The magnesium nanosized ferrite powder with formula MgFe2O4 was synthesized via a pyrochemical sol–gel glycine–nitrate method and annealed consistently at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. The MgFe2O4 ferrite samples’ microstructure was studied by SEM and XRD [...] Read more.
The magnesium nanosized ferrite powder with formula MgFe2O4 was synthesized via a pyrochemical sol–gel glycine–nitrate method and annealed consistently at temperatures of up to 1300 °C. The MgFe2O4 ferrite samples’ microstructure was studied by SEM and XRD methods. According to the results of the studies, the increase in MgFe2O4 nanoparticles size from about 15 nm to micron-sized particles was observed when increasing annealing temperatures. The DC electrical conductivity of MgFe2O4 also clearly shows the change in conduction behavior of samples with increased calcination temperatures. The electromagnetic microwave properties of micron-sized particles of MgFe2O4 ferrite powder for a 1200 °C annealing temperature were studied for composites in paraffin matrix with produced magnetic filler mass concentration at 40% and 50%. The filament composites of polymer polylactic acid with MgFe2O4 ferrite powder samples were prepared by the FDM 3D-printing process and their microwave-absorbing properties were investigated. The application of developed PLA–MgFe2O4 ferrite filament for fabricating magnetic microwave-absorbing components also was demonstrated. Full article
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