Biobased Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials

A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomacromolecules, Biobased and Biodegradable Polymers".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 4603

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Grupo de Investigación de Fotoquímica y Fotobiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad del Atlántico, Carrera 30 Número 8-49, 081008 Puerto Colombia, Colombia
Interests: tissue engineering; acrylic cement for bone biomedical applications; chitosan–essential oil composites for food preservation; scaffolds for antimicrobial and tissue engineering applications; chitosan beads and hydrogels for adsorption contamination; valorization of food waste
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on current research in biobased organic–inorganic hybrid materials with an emphasis on their application in advanced technologies. 

Hybrid materials are composites consisting of at least two constituents. In a hybrid composite, the shortcomings of one type of constituent can be mitigated by the other constituent. Proper design work can lead to a balance of various properties. Biobased polymers have attracted great interest in recent decades as alternatives to conventional fossil-based polymers from nonrenewable resources. The production of biopolymer nanocomposites through the use of inorganic fillers has evolved with a high level of interest. These biopolymer nanocomposites have various applications in medicine, tissue engineering, the food and petroleum industries, paper and pulp industry, printing and textile industry, electronics, sensors, actuators, etc.

This Special Issue, “Biobased Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials”, aims to cover the latest developments regarding the synthesis, functionalization, characterization, and application of related composites. It represents an excellent opportunity for researchers to present their latest works to address the fundamental aspects and applied research within this field. 

Full articles, short communications, and review articles are welcome.

Dr. Carlos David Grande Tovar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Polymers is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 3426 KiB  
Article
Effect of Glycerol as Processing Oil in Natural Rubber/Carbon Black Composites: Processing, Mechanical, and Thermal Aging Properties
by Weerawut Naebpetch, Sutiwat Thumrat, Indriasari, Yeampon Nakaramontri and Suppachai Sattayanurak
Polymers 2023, 15(17), 3599; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15173599 - 30 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1492
Abstract
The present work aims to study the effect of glycerol as a replacement for mineral oils in natural rubber (NR) composites to obtain suitable properties via cure characteristics, mechanical properties, and thermal stability. Glycerol was used at a 5 phr rate in the [...] Read more.
The present work aims to study the effect of glycerol as a replacement for mineral oils in natural rubber (NR) composites to obtain suitable properties via cure characteristics, mechanical properties, and thermal stability. Glycerol was used at a 5 phr rate in the compound with carbon black as a reinforcing filler and was compared to mineral processing oils such as aromatic oil, treated distillate aromatic extracted oil, and paraffinic oil. Compared to the other oils, glycerol exhibits better maximum torque and torque differences. Also, a shorter scorch time, cure time, and a higher cure rate index of the compounds were observed. However, although the received mechanical properties, including tensile strength, elongation at break, and compression set of the vulcanized rubber using glycerol showed slightly lower values than the others, the 100% and 300% moduli, as well as the hardness of the composites filled with glycerol, exhibit better values relative to the other commercial oils. These findings demonstrate that glycerol overall presents a good balance of properties, making it beneficial to use glycerol as a substitute for mineral oil in tire, shoe sole, and rubber stopper applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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22 pages, 7372 KiB  
Article
Effects of Shellac Self-Repairing and Carbonyl Iron Powder Microcapsules on the Properties of Dulux Waterborne Coatings on Wood
by Wenbo Li and Xiaoxing Yan
Polymers 2023, 15(9), 2016; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15092016 - 24 Apr 2023
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 802
Abstract
Magnetic carbonyl iron powder (CIP) microcapsules were created by in situ polymerization using melamine resin as the wall material and CIP as the core material. They were mixed with shellac self-repairing microcapsules to prepare dual-functional wood coatings, and the effect of different amounts [...] Read more.
Magnetic carbonyl iron powder (CIP) microcapsules were created by in situ polymerization using melamine resin as the wall material and CIP as the core material. They were mixed with shellac self-repairing microcapsules to prepare dual-functional wood coatings, and the effect of different amounts of CIP microcapsules in the Dulux Waterborne primer on the performance of the primer was investigated. The findings demonstrated that the core-wall ratio had a significant impact on the characteristics of CIP microcapsules. The microcapsule coating rate reached 57.7% when the core-wall ratio was 0.65:1. The maximum reflection loss of CIP microcapsules with the core-wall ratio of 0.70:1 is −10.53 dB. When the addition amount of shellac self-repairing microcapsules is 4.2%, and the additional amount of CIP microcapsules with a core wall ratio of 0.65:1 and 0.70:1 is 3.0%, the coating color difference is the smallest. The number of microcapsules causes a noticeable drop in the coating’s gloss, and the amount of microcapsules causes a small negative change in the coating’s adherence. With an increase in the number of microcapsules, the coating’s hardness, impact resistance, and tensile resistance first rose and subsequently fell. When the content of CIP microcapsules with core-wall ratio of 0.65:1 and 0.70:1 was 9.0%, the hardness, elongation at break and repair rate of the coating reached the best performance. According to a comprehensive analysis, when the content of CIP microcapsules with core-wall ratio of 0.70:1 is 9.0%, the coating has good performance. At this time, the coating has a color difference of 1.83, a glossiness of 19.3, an adhesion of 2 H, a hardness of 3 H, an impact resistance of 17 kg·cm, and a repair rate of 33.3%. This provides a technical basis for the application of multifunctional coatings on wooden substrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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17 pages, 3782 KiB  
Article
Synthesis, Characterization, and Optimization Studies of Polycaprolactone/Polylactic Acid/Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle/Orange Essential Oil Membranes for Biomedical Applications
by Jorge Ivan Castro, Stiven Astudillo, Jose Herminsul Mina Hernandez, Marcela Saavedra, Paula A. Zapata, Carlos Humberto Valencia-Llano, Manuel N. Chaur and Carlos David Grande-Tovar
Polymers 2023, 15(1), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/polym15010135 - 28 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1661
Abstract
The development of scaffolds for cell regeneration has increased because they must have adequate biocompatibility and mechanical properties to be applied in tissue engineering. In this sense, incorporating nanofillers or essential oils has allowed new architectures to promote cell proliferation and regeneration of [...] Read more.
The development of scaffolds for cell regeneration has increased because they must have adequate biocompatibility and mechanical properties to be applied in tissue engineering. In this sense, incorporating nanofillers or essential oils has allowed new architectures to promote cell proliferation and regeneration of new tissue. With this goal, we prepared four membranes based on polylactic acid (PLA), polycaprolactone (PCL), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), and orange essential oil (OEO) by the drop-casting method. The preparation of TiO2-NPs followed the sol–gel process with spherical morphology and an average size of 13.39 nm ± 2.28 nm. The results show how the TiO2-NP properties predominate over the crystallization processes, reflected in the decreasing crystallinity percentage from 5.2% to 0.6% in the membranes. On the other hand, when OEO and TiO2-NPs are introduced into a membrane, they act synergistically due to the inclusion of highly conjugated thermostable molecules and the thermal properties of TiO2-NPs. Finally, incorporating OEO and TiO2-NPs promotes tissue regeneration due to the decrease in inflammatory infiltrate and the appearance of connective tissue. These results demonstrate the great potential for biomedical applications of the membranes prepared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biobased Organic–Inorganic Hybrid Materials)
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