The Multifaceted Responses of Plants to Visible and Ultraviolet Radiation

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Physiology and Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2023) | Viewed by 25390

Special Issue Editors

Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy
Interests: plant-environment interactions; early defensive mechanisms; nutraceutical quality of plant food; ultraviolet radiation; edible coatings, antioxidants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, I-56124 Pisa, Italy
Interests: plant-environment interactions; early defensive mechanisms; nutraceutical quality of plant food; ultraviolet radiation; edible coatings; antioxidants
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Years of evolution under solar radiation have led plants to develop fine regulation systems involving many photoreceptors, signal transduction pathways, and intracellular responses in order to survive and acclimate to the ever-changing solar conditions. Light plays a key role during plants lifespan, affecting several physiological and biochemical processes, e.g., photosynthesis and photomorphogenesis. Irradiance, wavelength, and exposure time are major factors modulating diverse processes, from seed germination to plant growth, flowering, and fruit formation, and have a profound influence also on the nutritional–nutraceutical qualities of plant food. The reaction of plants or fruits towards a specific radiation might largely differ not only from species to species but also among cultivars, thus inducing either acclimation or stress responses. Moreover, exposure to distinct radiations might trigger defensive mechanisms in the exposed plants, changing their susceptibility towards both biotic and abiotic stressors. Recent evidence has also shown that not only directly exposed organs or tissues but also light-screened plant portions can perceive and/or respond to visible and ultraviolet radiation, due to signaling mechanisms partially still unknown.

This Special Issue of Plants aims to highlight the fascinating role of light radiations in plant life from diverse perspectives, from perception to specific functions or processes, from gene expression to plant–environment interactions, without forgetting the exploitation of specific wavelengths to improve plant yield or to design plant foods enriched in health-promoting compounds.

Dr. Antonella Castagna
Dr. Marco Santin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • visible light
  • ultraviolet radiation
  • photoreceptors
  • signaling
  • photomorphogenesis
  • plant growth
  • primary and secondary metabolism
  • hormones
  • food quality

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (13 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

5 pages, 212 KiB  
Editorial
The Multifaceted Responses of Plants to Visible and Ultraviolet Radiation
Plants 2024, 13(5), 572; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13050572 - 20 Feb 2024
Viewed by 301
Abstract
Plant organisms rely on light energy to drive the photosynthetic processes needed for their growth and development, inducing modifications at physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

19 pages, 2331 KiB  
Article
Transcriptomic Analysis on the Peel of UV-B-Exposed Peach Fruit Reveals an Upregulation of Phenolic- and UVR8-Related Pathways
Plants 2023, 12(9), 1818; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12091818 - 28 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1125
Abstract
UV-B treatment deeply influences plant physiology and biochemistry, especially by activating the expression of responsive genes involved in UV-B acclimation through a UV-B-specific perception mechanism. Although the UV-B-related molecular responses have been widely studied in Arabidopsis, relatively few research reports deepen the [...] Read more.
UV-B treatment deeply influences plant physiology and biochemistry, especially by activating the expression of responsive genes involved in UV-B acclimation through a UV-B-specific perception mechanism. Although the UV-B-related molecular responses have been widely studied in Arabidopsis, relatively few research reports deepen the knowledge on the influence of post-harvest UV-B treatment on fruit. In this work, a transcriptomic approach is adopted to investigate the transcriptional modifications occurring in the peel of UV-B-treated peach (Prunus persica L., cv Fairtime) fruit after harvest. Our analysis reveals a higher gene regulation after 1 h from the irradiation (88% of the differentially expressed genes—DEGs), compared to 3 h recovery. The overexpression of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), chalcone syntase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), and flavonol synthase (FLS) revealed a strong activation of the phenylpropanoid pathway, resulting in the later increase in the concentration of specific flavonoid classes, e.g., anthocyanins, flavones, dihydroflavonols, and flavanones, 36 h after the treatment. Upregulation of UVR8-related genes (HY5, COP1, and RUP) suggests that UV-B-triggered activation of the UVR8 pathway occurs also in post-harvest peach fruit. In addition, a regulation of genes involved in the cell-wall dismantling process (PME) is observed. In conclusion, post-harvest UV-B exposure deeply affects the transcriptome of the peach peel, promoting the activation of genes implicated in the biosynthesis of phenolics, likely via UVR8. Thus, our results might pave the way to a possible use of post-harvest UV-B treatments to enhance the content of health-promoting compounds in peach fruits and extending the knowledge of the UVR8 gene network. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1902 KiB  
Article
Effects of UV-B Radiation on the Performance, Antioxidant Response and Protective Compounds of Hazelnut Pollen
Plants 2022, 11(19), 2574; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11192574 - 29 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1524
Abstract
Increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation is expected to become a problem in hazelnut cultivation. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of UV-B on hazelnut pollen. To this end, the pollens were exposed to UV-B for 1, 2, and 3 h [...] Read more.
Increasing ultraviolet (UV) radiation is expected to become a problem in hazelnut cultivation. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of UV-B on hazelnut pollen. To this end, the pollens were exposed to UV-B for 1, 2, and 3 h at distances of 10, 20, 30, and 40 cm. Groups treated for 2 h at 20 cm and 3 h at 10 and 20 cm were identified as the most affected based on the results of viability, germination, and tube elongation. Further studies on these groups showed that UV-B does not change the DPPH radical scavenging activity for all groups. However, total phenolic compounds decreased after 3 h of treatment at 10 and 20 cm, while total flavonoid compounds decreased after all treatment groups. The UV-B absorbance of cytoplasmic and cell-wall-bound fractions decreased for all groups. The UV-B absorbance of the sporopollenin-derived fraction increased after 2 h of treatment at 20 cm but decreases after treatment for 3 h at 10 and 20 cm. In summary, exposure to UV-B for different times and distances adversely affected pollen grains in terms of pollen viability, germination rate, tube length, and the level of antioxidant molecules and UV-absorbing compounds. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1667 KiB  
Article
UV-B Irradiation Effect on Microalgae Performance in the Remediation of Effluent Derived from the Cigarette Butt Cleaning Process
Plants 2022, 11(18), 2356; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11182356 - 09 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
In this study, the potential of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation to alleviate the effects of pollutants in cigarette butt wastewater (CBW) was investigated using different Chlorella sorokiniana strains (F4, R1 and LG1). Microalgae were treated with UV-B (1.7 W m−2) for [...] Read more.
In this study, the potential of ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation to alleviate the effects of pollutants in cigarette butt wastewater (CBW) was investigated using different Chlorella sorokiniana strains (F4, R1 and LG1). Microalgae were treated with UV-B (1.7 W m−2) for 3 days prior to their exposure to CBW and then incubated for 4 days in the absence or presence of UV-B. UV-B-untreated microalgae were used as the control. Comparative physiological responses, including photosynthetic pigments and non-enzymatic antioxidants, as well as nicotine and nicotyrine removal, were evaluated in 7-day cultures. UV-B treatments did not negatively impact algal chlorophyll or carotenoid production. UV-B acclimation was strain-dependent, correlating with native environment adaptations and genetic constitutions. UV-B as a pretreatment had long-term positive effects on non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity. However, LG1 needed more time to readjust the pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance, as it was the most UV-B-sensitive. Phenolic compounds played an important role in the antioxidant system response to UV-B, while flavonoids did not contribute to the total antioxidant capacity. Although cross-resistance between UV-B and CBW was observed in F4 and R1, only R1 showed nicotine/nicotyrine catabolism induction due to UV-B. Overall, the results suggest that UV-B activates defense pathways associated with resistance or tolerance to nicotine and nicotyrine. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

28 pages, 2288 KiB  
Article
Foliar and Root Comparative Metabolomics and Phenolic Profiling of Micro-Tom Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) Plants Associated with a Gene Expression Analysis in Response to Short Daily UV Treatments
Plants 2022, 11(14), 1829; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11141829 - 12 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1673
Abstract
Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is globally recognised as a high-value crop both for commercial profit and nutritional benefits. In contrast to the extensive data regarding the changes in the metabolism of tomato fruit exposed to UV radiation, less is known about the [...] Read more.
Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is globally recognised as a high-value crop both for commercial profit and nutritional benefits. In contrast to the extensive data regarding the changes in the metabolism of tomato fruit exposed to UV radiation, less is known about the foliar and root metabolome. Using an untargeted metabolomic approach through UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS analysis, we detected thousands of metabolites in the leaves (3000) and roots (2800) of Micro-Tom tomato plants exposed to 11 days of short daily UV radiation, applied only on the aboveground organs. Multivariate statistical analysis, such as OPLS-DA and volcano, were performed to allow a better understanding of the modifications caused by the treatment. Based on the unexpected modulation to the secondary metabolism, especially the phenylpropanoid pathway, of which compounds were down and up accumulated respectively in leaves and roots of treated plants, a phenolic profiling was carried out for both organs. The phenolic profile was associated with a gene expression analysis to check the transcription trend of genes involved in the UVR8 signalling pathway and the early steps of the phenolic biosynthesis. The retention of the modifications at metabolic and phenolic levels was also investigated 3 days after the UV treatment, showing a prolonged effect on the modulation once the UV treatment had ceased. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 2529 KiB  
Article
Growth and Biosynthesis of Phenolic Compounds of Canola (Brassica napus L.) to Different Ultraviolet (UV)-B Wavelengths in a Plant Factory with Artificial Light
Plants 2022, 11(13), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11131732 - 29 Jun 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1574
Abstract
The application of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation to supplement visible light as an elicitor to increase bioactive compounds under controlled conditions is increasing. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of UV-B dose and wavelength region (280–300 and 300–320 nm) on the morphological, physiological, [...] Read more.
The application of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation to supplement visible light as an elicitor to increase bioactive compounds under controlled conditions is increasing. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of UV-B dose and wavelength region (280–300 and 300–320 nm) on the morphological, physiological, and biochemical responses of canola plants (Brassica napus L.). Canola plants (17 days after sowing) were subjected to various UV-B intensities (i.e., 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 W m−2) and were divided into cut and non-cut treatments for each UV treatment. Plant growth parameters exhibited different trends based on the treated UV irradiation intensity. Plant growth gradually decreased as the UV irradiation intensity and exposure time increased. Despite the same UV irradiation intensity, plant response varied significantly depending on the presence or absence of a short-wavelength cut filter (<300 nm). Canola plants suffered more leaf damage in nonfilter treatments containing shorter wavelengths (280–300 nm). UV treatment effectively activates the expression of secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes, differing depending on the UV irradiation intensity. Our results suggest that both UV irradiation intensity and wavelength should be considered when enhancing antioxidant phytochemicals without inhibiting plant growth in a plant factory with artificial light. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 12725 KiB  
Article
Effect of UV-B Radiation on Flavonoids and Phenols Accumulation in Tempisque (Sideroxylon capiri Pittier) Callus
Plants 2022, 11(4), 473; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11040473 - 09 Feb 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2354
Abstract
Tempisque (Sideroxylon capiri Pittier) is classified as a threatened species and has been reported with a high content of phenols and flavonoids in the leaves. The use of abiotic elicitors such as radiation has been reported due to the changes it produces [...] Read more.
Tempisque (Sideroxylon capiri Pittier) is classified as a threatened species and has been reported with a high content of phenols and flavonoids in the leaves. The use of abiotic elicitors such as radiation has been reported due to the changes it produces in the metabolism of plants by activating their defense mechanisms and increasing the biosynthesis of bioactive compounds with antioxidant capacity such as phenols and flavonoids. Therefore, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of UV-B radiation on growth parameters and the synthesis of bioactive compounds in in vitro culture of tempisque callus. For the callus induction, we used thidiazuron (TDZ) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) at 0, 0.5 and 1 mg/L. Calluses were exposed to UV-B radiation (0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h/day) for two and four weeks. The highest callus formation index was obtained with TDZ and 2,4-D at 1 mg/mL. The greatest increase in the concentration of phenols and flavonoids was detected in the fourth week with 4 h of exposure per day. The highest concentrations of quercetin (230 µg/g dry weight), kaempferol (235 µg/g dry weight) and gallic acid (240 µg/g dry weight) were found in callus obtained from leaves explants. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 1566 KiB  
Article
The Function of Flavonoids in the Diurnal Rhythm under Rapidly Changing UV Conditions—A Model Study on Okra
Plants 2021, 10(11), 2268; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10112268 - 22 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2131
Abstract
Flavonoids are favored compounds in plant responses to UV exposure and act in UV absorption and antioxidant activity. Here, it was investigated, with okra as a model species, how fast plants can react to changing UV conditions and to what extent these reactions [...] Read more.
Flavonoids are favored compounds in plant responses to UV exposure and act in UV absorption and antioxidant activity. Here, it was investigated, with okra as a model species, how fast plants can react to changing UV conditions and to what extent these reactions take place. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) plants were exposed to either full or nearly no UV radiation. The diurnal rhythm of the plants was driven by the UV radiation and showed up to a 50% increase of the flavonoid content (measured optically in the +UV plants). This was reflected only in the trends in UV-absorption and antioxidant activity of the extracts but not in the soluble flavonoid glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. In a second experiment, a transfer from a −UV to a +UV condition at 9:00 CDT showed the immediate start of the diurnal rhythm, while this did not occur if the transfer occurred later in the day; these plants only started a diurnal rhythm the following day. After an adaptation period of seven days, clear differences between the +UV and -UV plants could be found in all parameters, whereas plants transferred to the opposite UV condition settle between the +UV and -UV plants in all parameters. Broadly, it can be seen that the flavonoid contents and associated functions in the plant are subject to considerable changes within one day and within several days due to the UV conditions and that this can have a considerable impact on the quality of plant foods. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 1177 KiB  
Article
To What Extent Are the Effects of UV Radiation on Grapes Conserved in the Resulting Wines?
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1678; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081678 - 15 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2135
Abstract
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation strongly influences grape composition, but only a few studies have focused on how this influence is conserved in the resulting wines. Here we analyzed to what extent the changes induced by exposing Tempranillo grapes to UV radiation from budbreak to [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet (UV) radiation strongly influences grape composition, but only a few studies have focused on how this influence is conserved in the resulting wines. Here we analyzed to what extent the changes induced by exposing Tempranillo grapes to UV radiation from budbreak to harvest were conserved in wine. By using different cut-off filters and lamps, we differentiated the effects of ambient levels of UV-A and UV-B wavelengths, as well as the effects of a realistic UV-B enhancement associated with climate change. Among phenolic compounds, the most consistent responses to UV were those of flavonols (particularly quercetin-, kaempferol-, isorhamnetin- and myricetin-glycosides), which significantly increased in wines whose grapes had been exposed to a synergic combination of UV-A and UV-B radiation. This confirms that flavonols are the phenolic compounds most reliably conserved from UV-exposed grapes to wine, despite the possible influence of the winemaking process. Flavonols are important compounds because they contribute to wine co-pigmentation by stabilizing anthocyanins, and they are interesting antioxidants and nutraceuticals. Hydroxycinnamic acids also increased under the same UV combination or under UV-A alone. Wine VOCs were much less reactive to the UV received by grapes than phenolic compounds, and only esters showed significantly higher values under (mainly) UV-A alone. This was surprising because (1) UV-A has been considered to be less important than UV-B to induce metabolic changes in plants, and (2) esters are produced during winemaking. Esters are relevant due to their contribution to the fruity aroma in wines. In general, the remaining phenolic compounds (stilbenes, flavanols, hydroxybenzoic acids, and anthocyanins) and VOCs (alcohols, hydrocarbons, and fatty acids), together with wine color and antioxidant capacity, showed inconsistent or non-significant responses to UV radiation. These results were summarized by a multivariate analysis. Our study opens up new possibilities to artificially manipulate UV radiation in grapevine cultivation to improve both grape and wine quality. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 2119 KiB  
Article
Narrow-Band 311 nm Ultraviolet-B Radiation Evokes Different Antioxidant Responses from Broad-Band Ultraviolet
Plants 2021, 10(8), 1570; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10081570 - 30 Jul 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1814
Abstract
Supplemental narrow-band 311 nm UV-B radiation was applied in order to study the effect of this specific wavelength on tobacco as a model plant. UV-B at photon fluxes varying between 2.9 and 9.9 μmol m−2 s−1 was applied to supplement 150 [...] Read more.
Supplemental narrow-band 311 nm UV-B radiation was applied in order to study the effect of this specific wavelength on tobacco as a model plant. UV-B at photon fluxes varying between 2.9 and 9.9 μmol m−2 s−1 was applied to supplement 150 μmol m−2 s−1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for four hours in the middle of the light period for four days. Narrow-band UV-B increased leaf flavonoid and phenolic acid contents. In leaves exposed to 311 nm radiation, superoxide dismutase activity increased, but phenolic peroxidase activity decreased, and the changes were proportional to the UV flux. Ascorbate peroxidase activities were not significantly affected. Narrow-band UV-B caused a dose-dependent linear decrease in the quantum efficiency of photosystem II, up to approximately 10% loss. A parallel decrease in non-regulated non-photochemical quenching indicates potential electron transfer to oxygen in UV-treated leaves. In addition to a flux-dependent increase in the imbalance between enzymatic H2O2 production and neutralization, this resulted in an approximately 50% increase in leaf H2O2 content under 2.9–6 μmol m−2 s−1 UV-B. Leaf H2O2 decreased to control levels under higher UV-B fluxes due to the onset of increased non-enzymatic H2O2- and superoxide-neutralizing capacities, which were not observed under lower fluxes. These antioxidant responses to 311 nm UV-B were different from our previous findings in plants exposed to broad-band UV-B. The results suggest that signaling pathways activated by 311 nm radiation are distinct from those stimulated by other wavelengths and support the heterogeneous regulation of plant UV responses. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

17 pages, 4009 KiB  
Article
Effects of Nocturnal UV-B Irradiation on Growth, Flowering, and Phytochemical Concentration in Leaves of Greenhouse-Grown Red Perilla
Plants 2021, 10(6), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10061252 - 20 Jun 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2191
Abstract
In Japan, red perilla leaves are used in the food and coloring industries, as well as in crude medicine. Perilla leaves contain a high concentration of phytochemicals such as perillaldehyde (PA) and rosmarinic acid (RA). The effects of UV-B radiation intensity (0.05–0.2 W [...] Read more.
In Japan, red perilla leaves are used in the food and coloring industries, as well as in crude medicine. Perilla leaves contain a high concentration of phytochemicals such as perillaldehyde (PA) and rosmarinic acid (RA). The effects of UV-B radiation intensity (0.05–0.2 W m−2, UV-BBE: 0.041–0.083 W m−2), duration (3 or 6 h), and irradiation method (continuous or intermittent) for artificial nocturnal lighting using UV-B fluorescent lamps were evaluated on growth, flowering, and leaf phytochemical concentration in greenhouse-grown perilla. Under continuous UV-B irradiation at 0.1 W m−2 for 3 or 6 h, leaf color changed from red to green and leaf fresh weight decreased, compared with the control treatment. No leaf color change was observed under the 3-h treatment with UV-B radiation at 0.05 W m−2, wherein leaf fresh weight was similar to that of the control. Furthermore, RA concentration under continuous UV-B irradiation at 0.05 W m−2 for 3 h increased two-fold compared to that under control treatment, while PA concentration was not affected by UV-B irradiation. Thus, our data showed that continuous UV-B irradiation at 0.05 W m−2 for 3 h could effectively produce RA-rich perilla leaves without reducing in phenotypic quality or productivity. However, a 6-h intermittent illumination inhibited flowering without altering phytochemical concentration. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1659 KiB  
Article
Hormonal Regulation in Different Varieties of Chenopodium quinoa Willd. Exposed to Short Acute UV-B Irradiation
Plants 2021, 10(5), 858; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050858 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2281
Abstract
Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) due to global change can affect plant development and metabolism. Quinoa tolerates extreme conditions including high UV levels. However, the physiological mechanisms behind its abiotic stress tolerance are unclear, especially those related to UV-B. We previously demonstrated that 9.12 kJ [...] Read more.
Increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) due to global change can affect plant development and metabolism. Quinoa tolerates extreme conditions including high UV levels. However, the physiological mechanisms behind its abiotic stress tolerance are unclear, especially those related to UV-B. We previously demonstrated that 9.12 kJ m−2 d−1 may induce UV-B-specific signaling while 18.24 kJ m−2 d−1 promotes a UV-B-independent response. Here, we explored the effects of these UV-B doses on hormonal regulation linked to plant morphology and defense among diverse varieties. Changes in fluorescence parameters of photosystem II, flavonoids and hormones (indoleacetic acid (IAA), jasmonic acid (JA), abscisic acid (ABA) and salicylic acid (SA)) were surveyed under controlled conditions. Here, we showed that the sensitivity to short acute UV-B doses in varieties from different habitats is influenced by their parental lines and breeding time. UV-B sensitivity does not necessarily correlate with quinoa’s geographical distribution. The role of flavonoids in the UV-B response seems to be different depending on varieties. Moreover, we found that the extent of changes in JA and SA correlate with UV-B tolerance, while the increase of ABA was mainly related to UV-B stress. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

38 pages, 1682 KiB  
Review
Anything New under the Sun? An Update on Modulation of Bioactive Compounds by Different Wavelengths in Agricultural Plants
Plants 2021, 10(7), 1485; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10071485 - 20 Jul 2021
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 3357
Abstract
Plants continuously rely on light as an energy source and as the driver of many processes in their lifetimes. The ability to perceive different light radiations involves several photoreceptors, which in turn activate complex signalling cascades that ultimately lead to a rearrangement in [...] Read more.
Plants continuously rely on light as an energy source and as the driver of many processes in their lifetimes. The ability to perceive different light radiations involves several photoreceptors, which in turn activate complex signalling cascades that ultimately lead to a rearrangement in plant metabolism as an adaptation strategy towards specific light conditions. This review, after a brief summary of the structure and mode of action of the different photoreceptors, introduces the main classes of secondary metabolites and specifically focuses on the influence played by the different wavelengths on the content of these compounds in agricultural plants, because of their recognised roles as nutraceuticals. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop