Wild Aromatic and Medicinal Plants: Ethnobotany, Biochemistry, and Potential Applications

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 2128

Special Issue Editors

Centro de Investigación e Innovación Científica y Tecnológica, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila 25280, Saltillo, Coahuila, México
Interests: phytochemicals; antioxidants; antimicrobials; bioactive compounds; edible coatings and films; biocontrol
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Universidad Autonoma Agraria Antonio Narro, Calzada Antonio Narro 1923, Buenavista, Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico
Interests: bioactive compounds; metabolic pathways; phytochemicals; antioxidants; antimicrobials; agro-industry
Universidad de Sonora, Unidad Regional Norte, Ave. Universidad e Irigoyen, H. Caborca, Sonora 83600, Mexico
Interests: bioactive compounds; chemistry; folk medicine; antimicrobial; antibiofilm antiproliferative; antioxidant
Dr. Víctor Manuel Moo-Huchin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Tecnológico Nacional de México, Instituto Tecnológico de Mérida, Calle 10, Plan de Ayala, Mérida 97118, Yucatán, Mexico
Interests: bioactive compounds; food chemistry; starch; tropical fruits; food technology; antioxidants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wild aromatic and medicinal plants have long been recognized for their rich ethnobotanical heritage, bioactive compounds, and diverse potential applications. This Special Issue is an interdisciplinary study of wild aromatic and medicinal plants, focusing on ethnobotany, biochemistry, and their diverse applications. Ethnobotany reveals the traditional knowledge and cultural uses of these plants, highlighting their significance in traditional medicine and daily life. The biochemistry of these plants, containing bioactive compounds such as essential oils, alkaloids, and phenolic compounds, offers insight into medicinal applications. These plants have been used for centuries in traditional medicine and have attracted scientific research for natural products and pharmaceuticals. They have also been applied in aromatherapy, cosmetics, and sustainable agriculture. The search for active compounds from indigenous remedies is of current interest. This Special Issue serves as an introduction to the captivating world of wild aromatic and medicinal plants, emphasizes the importance of ethnobotanical knowledge, explores their biochemistry, and showcases their potential applications. Further research in this field promises new therapeutic discoveries, cultural preservation, and the sustainable utilization of valuable plant resources. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Biochemistry;
  • Synthesis process;
  • Domestication/seeding of wild plants;
  • Bioactive compounds;
  • Mechanisms of action;
  • Sustainable applications;
  • Novel products;
  • Future perspectives for wild aromatic and medicinal plants.

Dr. María L. Flores-López
Dr. Ana Verónica Charles-Rodríguez
Dr. Julio César López-Romero
Dr. Víctor Manuel Moo-Huchin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • folk medicine
  • ethnobotany
  • synthesis process
  • bioactive compounds
  • mechanisms of action
  • sustainable applications
  • novel products
 

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1479 KiB  
Article
Chemical Analysis of the Essential Oils from Three Populations of Lippia dulcis Trevir. Grown at Different Locations in Southern Ecuador
Plants 2024, 13(2), 253; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020253 - 16 Jan 2024
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Abstract
In this investigation, we have analyzed for the first time the essential oils (EOs) isolated by steam distillation of the leaves and flowers of Lippia dulcis Trevir., grown at three different locations in southern Ecuador: the Catacocha canton (Ca), the Vilcabamba parish (Vi), [...] Read more.
In this investigation, we have analyzed for the first time the essential oils (EOs) isolated by steam distillation of the leaves and flowers of Lippia dulcis Trevir., grown at three different locations in southern Ecuador: the Catacocha canton (Ca), the Vilcabamba parish (Vi), and the Chuquiribamba parish (Ch). Around 98.5% of the oils’ constituents were identified by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) and Gas Chromatography-Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) analysis using a DB-5ms capillary column. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were predominant in the EOs (79.77, 78.22, and 76.51%, respectively). The most representative constituents of the sample from the Ca canton were β-cedrene (16.75%), δ-selinene (11.04%), and β-cubebene (12.09%), while the sample from the Vi parish was characterized by the abundant presence of β-cedrene (17.9%), δ-selinene (12.52%), and bicyclogermacrene (11.34%). β-Cedrene (18.89%), δ-selinene (11.78%), and δ-cadinene (11.07%) were the main constituents of the essential oil (EO) from the Ch parish. The likely occurrence of low amounts of thermolabile hernandulcin in the volatile oils was indicated by the presence of the fragmentation products 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and 3-methyl-2-ciclohexen-1-one. In summary, the study gave us a clue to the variability of Lippia dulcis chemotypes depending on the collection sites. Full article
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13 pages, 1110 KiB  
Article
Phytotoxicity of Extracts of Argemone mexicana and Crotalaria longirostrata on Tomato Seedling Physiology
Plants 2023, 12(22), 3856; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12223856 - 15 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Phytotoxicity caused by secondary metabolites of botanical extracts is a drawback in agriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the phytotoxic effects of methanolic extracts of Crotalaria longirostrata and Argemone mexicana on the germination and physiological variables of tomato seedlings. The [...] Read more.
Phytotoxicity caused by secondary metabolites of botanical extracts is a drawback in agriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the phytotoxic effects of methanolic extracts of Crotalaria longirostrata and Argemone mexicana on the germination and physiological variables of tomato seedlings. The results indicated that high doses of both extracts (Clong500 and Amex500) inhibited tomato seed germination, while their mixture (Cl50 + Am50) promoted germination by 100%. At 30 days after transplanting (dat), the plant height increased by 15.4% with a high dose of C. longirostrata (Clong500) compared to the control. At 30 dat, the vigor index displayed a notable increase with Cl50 + Am50, reaching 29.5%. The root length increased with the mean dose of A. mexicana (Amex95) at 10, 20, and 30 dat (59.7%, 15.1%, and 22.4%, respectively). The chlorophyll content increased with Amex95 by 66.1% in 10 dat, 22.6% at 20 dat, and 19.6% at 30 dat. On the other hand, Amex95 had a higher nitrogen content throughout the trial. Amex95 produced the greatest increase in root dry weight by 731.5% and 209.4% at 10 and 20 dat. The foliage dry weight increased by 85.7% at 10 dat with Amex95 and up to 209.7% with Amex50 at 30 dat. The present investigation reveals the ability of the extracts to stimulate tomato growth at low and medium doses, though at high doses they exhibit allelopathic effects. Full article
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