Barley: A Versatile Crop for Sustainable Food Production

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Physiology and Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1933

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Process Engineering, Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: machine vision; image analysis (food, beverage, plant, and grain crop quality); food technology; novel foods; food byproducts; mathematical modeling and optimization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Technologies, Faculty of Food Technology Osijek, J.J. Strossmayer University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: food technology; functional food; food rheology; cereal technology; analytical and rheological characterization of flour and cereal-based products; development of cereal-based functional foods; mechanisms of bread staling; nutritional quality of cereals and cereal products; application of food industry byproducts
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce a Special Issue entitled "Barley: A Versatile Crop for Sustainable Food Production", which aims to advance our understanding and evaluation of barley cultivars and products. Barley plays a pivotal role in multiple industries, including agriculture, brewing, and food manufacturing. By refining quality evaluation methods and techniques, we can further optimize the production and consumption of high-quality barley-based products. This Special Issue focuses on exploring the diverse applications of barley in sustainable food production and cultivar breeding, with special attention to its nutritional value, culinary uses, and innovative food products.

We invite original research, reviews, and case studies shedding light on the potential of barley as a key ingredient in various food categories. Researchers, scientists, and industry experts are invited to contribute their insights and findings on a wide range of topics related to the quality assessment of barley. Some of the key areas of interest include:

  • Barley breeding for improved food quality and sensory attributes;
  • Novel evaluation approaches for the nutritional composition of barley cultivars;
  • Barley as a functional food ingredient and dietary solution;
  • Diverse applications of barley in traditional and innovative foods;
  • Quality assessment methods for barley-based products and beverages;
  • Barley bioactive compounds and their health benefits;
  • Advancements in brewing and malting quality for high-quality malt beverages;
  • Analytical techniques for detecting contaminants in barley products;
  • Barley quality in the context of sustainability and environmental impact;
  • Understanding consumer preferences and market trends for barley products;
  • Successful quality assessment strategies in the barley industry: case studies.

These key areas encompass a comprehensive range of topics related to barley, including its functional properties, dietary applications, health benefits, sustainability, cultural significance, waste utilization, and breeding efforts for enhanced food quality.

We enthusiastically welcome original research articles, reviews, and perspectives that contribute to the advancement of quality assessment techniques for barley cultivars and products. By disseminating the latest knowledge and insights, this Special Issue aims to support the development of high-quality barley-based products and enhance consumer satisfaction in various sectors.

We eagerly anticipate your valuable contributions to this exciting field of research as we work together to unlock the full potential of barley and ensure optimal quality in its cultivation and utilization.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jasmina Lukinac
Prof. Dr. Marko Jukić
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • barley
  • sustainable food production
  • cultivar breeding
  • nutritional composition
  • functional food ingredient
  • quality assessment
  • bioactive compounds
  • brewing and malting
  • environmental impact
  • consumer preferences

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 3992 KiB  
Article
Mulched Drip Fertigation with Growth Inhibitors Reduces Bundle-Sheath Cell Leakage and Improves Photosynthesis Capacity and Barley Production in Semi-Arid Regions
by Yinping Xu, Jianhua Liu, Cheng Ren, Xiaoxia Niu, Tinghong Zhang and Kecang Huo
Plants 2024, 13(2), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13020239 - 15 Jan 2024
Viewed by 595
Abstract
A better understanding of the factors that reduce bundle-sheath cell leakage to CO2 (Փ), enhance 13C carbon isotope discrimination, and enhance the photosynthetic capacity of barley leaves will be useful to develop a nutrient- and water-saving strategy for dry-land farming systems. Therefore, [...] Read more.
A better understanding of the factors that reduce bundle-sheath cell leakage to CO2 (Փ), enhance 13C carbon isotope discrimination, and enhance the photosynthetic capacity of barley leaves will be useful to develop a nutrient- and water-saving strategy for dry-land farming systems. Therefore, barley plants were exposed to a novel nitrification inhibitor (NI) (3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-1-yl succinic acid) (DMPSA) and a urease inhibitor (UI) (N-butyl thiophosphorictriamide (NBPT)) with mulched drip fertigation treatments, which included HF (high-drip fertigation (370 mm) under a ridge furrow system), MF (75% of HF, moderate-drip fertigation under a ridge furrow system), LF (50% of HF, low-drip fertigation under a ridge furrow system), and TP (traditional planting with no inhibitors or drip fertigation strategies). The results indicated that the nitrification inhibitor combined with mulched drip fertigation significantly reduced bundle-sheath cell leakage to CO2 (Փ) as a result of increased soil water content; this was demonstrated by the light and CO2 response curves of the photosynthesis capacity (An), the apparent quantum efficiency (α), and the 13C-photosynthate distribution. In the inhibitor-based strategy, the use of the urease and nitrification inhibitors reduced Փ by 35% and 39% compared with TP. In the NI-HF strategy, it was found that barley could retain the maximum photosynthesis capacity by increasing the leaf area index (LAI), An, rubisco content, soluble protein, dry matter per plant, and productivity. The CO2 and light response curves were considerably improved in the NI-HF and NI-MF treatments due to a higher 13C carbon isotope (Δ‰), respiration rate (Rd), and Ci/Ca, therefore obtaining the minimum Փ value. With both inhibitors, there was a significant difference between HF and LF drip fertigation. The NI-MF treatment significantly increased the grain yield, total chlorophyll content, WUE, and NUE by 52%, 47%, 57%, and 45%, respectively. Collectively, the results suggest that the new nitrification inhibitor (DMPSA) with HF or MF mulched drip fertigation could be promoted in semi-arid regions in order to mitigate bundle-sheath cell leakage to CO2 (Փ), without negatively affecting barley production and leading to the nutrient and water use efficiency of barley. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Barley: A Versatile Crop for Sustainable Food Production)
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19 pages, 9716 KiB  
Article
Innovative Approaches for Improving the Quality and Resilience of Spring Barley Seeds: The Role of Nanotechnology and Phytopathological Analysis
by Marzhan Sadenova, Natalya Kulenova, Sergey Gert, Nail Beisekenov and Eugene Levin
Plants 2023, 12(22), 3892; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12223892 - 18 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 944
Abstract
This study emphasizes the importance of seed quality in the context of yield formation. Based on the research data, this paper emphasizes the role of proper diagnosis of seed-borne pathogens in ensuring high and stable grain yields. Particular attention is paid to the [...] Read more.
This study emphasizes the importance of seed quality in the context of yield formation. Based on the research data, this paper emphasizes the role of proper diagnosis of seed-borne pathogens in ensuring high and stable grain yields. Particular attention is paid to the study of the effect of the treatment of mother plants with fullerenol-based nanopreparations on the qualitative characteristics of spring barley seeds. The results showed that such treatment contributes to the increase in varietal purity, weight of 1000 grains as well as to the increase of nutrient and moisture reserves in seeds. Phytopathological analysis confirmed the presence of various diseases such as Alternaria, helminthosporiosis, fusarium, mold and mildew on the seeds. However, some samples showed a high resistance to pathogens, presumably due to the use of carbon nanopreparations. These results open new perspectives for the development of strategies to improve barley yield and disease resistance through seed optimization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Barley: A Versatile Crop for Sustainable Food Production)
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