Molecular Breeding of Vegetable Crops

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2122

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Horticulture Science, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University, Hangzhou 311300, China
Interests: Cucurbitaceae crops; molecular breeding; agronomic traits; epigenetic regulation; epigenetic mechanisms; heavy metal tolerance; metal ion absorption and distribution; cadmium

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Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Helsinki, PL-27, Helsinki, Finland
Interests: germplasm conservation; molecular breeding; mutagenesis; plant biotechnology; plant tissue culture
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Amity Centre for Nuclear Biotechnology, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Maharashtra, Mumbai 410206, India
Interests: agricultural biotechnology; genetic engineering; genomics; plant stress biology; new plant breeding tools
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, research into crops’ molecular biology has expanded to all aspects of vegetable science. Vegetables are an important source of nutrients and energy in food. With improvements in living standards, people pay more attention to the quality and output of agricultural products. Therefore, it is one of the most fundamental tasks of scientific research to further improve the quality and output of vegetable products to meet the needs of people regarding high-quality agricultural products. The most practical and effective method is fine variety breeding. Molecular breeding is an important means to speed up the breeding process, and gene mapping is the basis of modern molecular breeding research. Due to the narrow genetic background of vegetable crops, the relevant molecular biology research progresses slowly until the whole genome sequence information is decoded. This Special Issue aims to collect research articles and review papers on the strategies and methods of gene mapping of important characters of vegetable crops and that outline the research progress of gene initial location and fine mapping, as well as papers describing recent developments in the pervasive roles of molecular biology in vegetable development, integrating metabolism, and plant–environment interactions.

Dr. Shengjun Feng
Dr. Shri Mohan Jain
Prof. Dr. Penna Suprasanna
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • molecular biology
  • abiotic stress
  • biotic stress
  • map-based cloning
  • genetic breeding
  • genome design breeding

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1245 KiB  
Article
Profiling the Bioactive Compounds in Broccoli Heads with Varying Organ Sizes and Growing Seasons
by Lu Shi, Yahui Li, Menghua Lin, Ying Liang and Zhiyong Zhang
Plants 2024, 13(10), 1329; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13101329 - 11 May 2024
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Abstract
Broccoli is a rich source of diverse bioactive compounds, but how their contents are influenced by different growing seasons and variations in broccoli head sizes remains elusive. To address this question, we quantified sixteen known bioactive compounds and seven minerals in broccoli with [...] Read more.
Broccoli is a rich source of diverse bioactive compounds, but how their contents are influenced by different growing seasons and variations in broccoli head sizes remains elusive. To address this question, we quantified sixteen known bioactive compounds and seven minerals in broccoli with varying head sizes obtained in two different growing seasons. Our results suggest that the contents of vitamin C, total phenols, carotenoids, and glucoraphanin were significantly higher in samples from the summer–autumn season, showing increases of 157.46%, 34.74%, 51.80%, and 17.78%, respectively, compared with those from the winter–spring season. Moreover, chlorogenic acid is a phenolic compound with relatively high contents among the six detected, while beta-sitosterol is the sterol with relatively high contents. Further, principal component analysis was conducted to rank the comprehensive scores of the profiles of phenolic compounds, phytosterols, and minerals, demonstrating that the broccoli samples grown during the summer–autumn season achieved the highest composite scores. Our results indicate that broccoli heads from the summer–autumn season are richer in a combination of bioactive compounds and minerals than those from the winter–spring season based on the composite score. This study extends our understanding of the nutrition profiles in broccoli and also lays the foundation for breeding broccoli varieties with improved nutrition quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Breeding of Vegetable Crops)
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15 pages, 10039 KiB  
Article
Cloning, Expression, and Functional Analysis of the MYB Transcription Factor SlMYB86-like in Tomato
by Na Chen, Wenwen Zhan, Qin Shao, Liangliang Liu, Qineng Lu, Weihai Yang and Zhiqun Que
Plants 2024, 13(4), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13040488 - 8 Feb 2024
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Abstract
MYB transcription factors (TFs) have been shown to play a key role in plant growth and development and are in response to various types of biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we clarified the structure, expression patterns, and function of a MYB TF, SlMYB86-like [...] Read more.
MYB transcription factors (TFs) have been shown to play a key role in plant growth and development and are in response to various types of biotic and abiotic stress. Here, we clarified the structure, expression patterns, and function of a MYB TF, SlMYB86-like (Solyc06g071690) in tomato using an inbred tomato line exhibiting high resistance to bacterial wilt (Hm 2-2 (R)) and one susceptible line (BY 1-2 (S)). The full-length cDNA sequence of this gene was 1226 bp, and the open reading frame was 966 bp, which encoded 321 amino acids; its relative molecular weight was 37.05055 kDa; its theoretical isoelectric point was 7.22; it was a hydrophilic nonsecreted protein; and it had no transmembrane structures. The protein also contains a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain and was predicted to be localized to the nucleus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SlMYB86-like is closely related to SpMYB86-like in Solanum pennellii and clustered with other members of the family Solanaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that the expression of the SlMYB86-like gene was tissue specific and could be induced by Ralstonia solanacearum, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid. The results of virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) revealed that SlMYB86-like silencing decreased the resistance of tomato plants to bacterial wilt, suggesting that it positively regulates the resistance of tomatoes to bacterial wilt. Overall, these findings indicate that SlMYB86-like plays a key role in regulating the resistance of tomatoes to bacterial wilt. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Breeding of Vegetable Crops)
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