Barley Genomics, Genetics, and Breeding

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1115

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Western Crop Genetics Alliance, Murdoch University, Perth, WA 6150, Australia
Interests: crop genomics; QTL mapping; breeding; genetics; association mapping

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is the fourth largest grain crop globally and is a vital cereal crop used for food, animal feed, and in the brewing industry. The barley genome has been sequenced, which provides a comprehensive blueprint of its genetic code. The genome sequence helps researchers locate DNA variations within the genome, identify genes controlling various traits, and understand their functions by combining genetic mapping, QTL analysis and gene validation via gene expression analysis and gene transformation. Compared to conventional breeding, breeders can use the knowledge of barley genetics and marker-assisted selection to select plants more efficiently. The goal is to develop barley varieties that meet the changing needs of agriculture and industry, including enhancing resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses, producing higher grain yields and improving nutritional value. Better understanding the barley genomics, genetics, and breeding is crucial for ensuring a stable and productive supply of this important cereal crop in the face of climate change and evolving agricultural needs.

In this Special Issue, we focus on the genomics, genetics and breeding in barley, hoping to uncover new loci, genes, alleles and technologies for future breeding.

Dr. Gaofeng Zhou
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • crop genetics
  • QTL mapping
  • breeding
  • genomics
  • association mapping

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 1113 KiB  
Article
Bringing Barley Back: Analysis of Heritage Varieties for Use as Germplasm Sources to Improve Resistance against the Most Devastating, Contemporary Disease in Canada, Fusarium Head Blight (Fusarium graminearum)
by James R. Tucker, Ana Badea, Barbara A. Blackwell, Dan MacEachern and Aaron Mills
Plants 2024, 13(6), 799; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13060799 - 11 Mar 2024
Viewed by 813
Abstract
Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is currently the most devastating disease for barley (Hordeum vulgare) in Canada. Associated mycotoxins can compromise grain quality, where deoxynivalenol (DON) is considered particularly damaging due to its frequency of detection. Breeding [...] Read more.
Fusarium head blight (FHB), caused by Fusarium graminearum, is currently the most devastating disease for barley (Hordeum vulgare) in Canada. Associated mycotoxins can compromise grain quality, where deoxynivalenol (DON) is considered particularly damaging due to its frequency of detection. Breeding barley with a lower DON content is difficult, due to the poor adaptation and malt quality of resistance sources. A set of European-derived heritage varieties were screened in an FHB nursery in Charlottetown, PE, with selections tested at Brandon, MB, between 2018–2022. Genetic evaluation demonstrated a distinct clustering of Canadian varieties from the heritage set. At Brandon, 72% of the heritage varieties ranked lower for DON content than did the moderately resistant Canadian check ‘AAC Goldman’, but resistance was associated with later heading and taller stature. In contrast with Canadian modern malting variety ‘AAC Synergy’, general deficiencies were observed in yield, enzyme activity, and extract, along with higher protein content. Nonetheless, several resistant varieties were identified with reasonable a heading date and yield, including ‘Chevallier Chile’, ‘Domen’, ‘Djugay’, ‘Hannchen’, ‘Heils Franken’, ‘Moravian Barley’, ‘Loosdorfer’ with ‘Golden Melon’, ‘Nutans Moskva’, and ‘Vellavia’, these being some of the most promising varieties when malting quality characteristics were also considered. These heritage resources could be used as parents in breeding to develop FHB-resistant malting barley varieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Barley Genomics, Genetics, and Breeding)
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