Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics of Forest Trees

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 1291

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Forestry, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
Interests: forest molecular biology; tree physiology; plant developmental biology; plant-microbe interactions
College of JunCao Science and Ecology, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China
Interests: plant microbiome; replant disease; plant-soil feedback; rhizosphere ecology; bioinformatics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue, titled "Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics of Forest Trees", aims to delve into the underlying genetic mechanisms and molecular processes that regulate the growth, development, and adaptability of forest trees. Through an in-depth exploration of molecular biology techniques such as DNA sequencing, gene expression profiling, and proteomics, researchers can gain insights into the intricate molecular networks and pathways within trees.

Moreover, this Special Issue underscores the pivotal role of bioinformatics in forestry research. Bioinformatics facilitates the management and analysis of vast genomic datasets, empowering researchers to derive valuable insights through computational methods. Understanding the complex relationships between plants and microbes is also crucial for unraveling the dynamics of forest ecosystems. By leveraging bioinformatics, researchers can analyze the intricate interaction networks between forest trees and microbes, deciphering the key genes, metabolic pathways, and signaling cascades involved.

In summary, this Special Issue places a strong emphasis on molecular biology and bioinformatics, while also welcoming research on plant–microbe interactions. It aims to provide novel insights and methodologies to deepen our understanding of forest tree genetics, enhance breeding strategies, and support sustainable forest management practices. We eagerly anticipate receiving the contributions of active scholars and researchers to collectively advance this field.

Dr. Shijiang Cao
Dr. Linkun Wu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest molecular biology
  • bioinformatics
  • tree genetics
  • gene expression regulation
  • plant–microbe interactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3642 KiB  
Article
Comparative Genome-Wide Identification of the Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Family in Tea and Oil Tea
by Ziqi Ye, Dan Mao, Yujian Wang, Hongda Deng, Xing Liu, Tongyue Zhang, Zhiqiang Han and Xingtan Zhang
Plants 2024, 13(11), 1444; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13111444 - 23 May 2024
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Abstract
Camellia oil is valuable as an edible oil and serves as a base material for a range of high-value products. Camellia plants of significant economic importance, such as Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera, have been classified into sect. Thea and sect. Oleifera [...] Read more.
Camellia oil is valuable as an edible oil and serves as a base material for a range of high-value products. Camellia plants of significant economic importance, such as Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera, have been classified into sect. Thea and sect. Oleifera, respectively. Fatty acid desaturases play a crucial role in catalyzing the formation of double bonds at specific positions of fatty acid chains, leading to the production of unsaturated fatty acids and contributing to lipid synthesis. Comparative genomics results have revealed that expanded gene families in oil tea are enriched in functions related to lipid, fatty acid, and seed processes. To explore the function of the FAD gene family, a total of 82 FAD genes were identified in tea and oil tea. Transcriptome data showed the differential expression of the FAD gene family in mature seeds of tea tree and oil tea tree. Furthermore, the structural analysis and clustering of FAD proteins provided insights for the further exploration of the function of the FAD gene family and its role in lipid synthesis. Overall, these findings shed light on the role of the FAD gene family in Camellia plants and their involvement in lipid metabolism, as well as provide a reference for understanding their function in oil synthesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics of Forest Trees)
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11 pages, 2913 KiB  
Communication
Overexpression of Larch SCL6 Inhibits Transitions from Vegetative Meristem to Inflorescence and Flower Meristem in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.
by Jun-Xia Xing, Qiao-Lu Zang, Zha-Long Ye, Li-Wang Qi, Ling Yang and Wan-Feng Li
Plants 2024, 13(9), 1232; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13091232 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 660
Abstract
SCARECROW-LIKE6 (SCL6) plays a role in the formation and maintenance of the meristem. In Larix kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr., an important afforestation tree species in China, SCL6 (LaSCL6) has two alternative splicing variants—LaSCL6-var1 and LaSCL6-var2—which are regulated by [...] Read more.
SCARECROW-LIKE6 (SCL6) plays a role in the formation and maintenance of the meristem. In Larix kaempferi (Lamb.) Carr., an important afforestation tree species in China, SCL6 (LaSCL6) has two alternative splicing variants—LaSCL6-var1 and LaSCL6-var2—which are regulated by microRNA171. However, their roles are still unclear. In this study, LaSCL6-var1 and LaSCL6-var2 were transformed into the Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. genome, and the phenotypic characteristics of transgenic A. thaliana, including the germination percentage, root length, bolting time, flower and silique formation times, inflorescence axis length, and branch and silique numbers, were analyzed to reveal their functions. It was found that LaSCL6-var1 and LaSCL6-var2 overexpression shortened the root length by 41% and 31%, respectively, and increased the inflorescence axis length. Compared with the wild type, the bolting time in transgenic plants was delayed by approximately 2–3 days, the first flower and silique formation times were delayed by approximately 3–4 days, and the last flower and silique formation times were delayed by about 5 days. Overall, the life cycle in transgenic plants was prolonged by approximately 5 days. These results show that LaSCL6 overexpression inhibited the transitions from the vegetative meristem to inflorescence meristem and from the flower meristem to meristem arrest in A. thaliana, revealing the roles of LaSCL6-var1 and LaSCL6-var2 in the fate transition and maintenance of the meristem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics of Forest Trees)
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