Pharmacy Education: State-of-the-Art, Contemporary and Historical Perspectives in Australia

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacy Education and Student/Practitioner Training".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 2565

Special Issue Editor

School of Biomedical Science, Charles Sturt University, Locked Bag 883, Orange 2800, Australia
Interests: pharmacy education; allied health; workplace learning; assessment; sustainable practice
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the 21st century, pharmacy education in Australia and globally has experienced continuing change to learning and teaching practices due to government policies and bodies such as TEQSA (https://www.teqsa.gov.au/), generational change due to the entry of “digital natives”, and uncertainty in the times of the COVID-19 pandemic. These challenges and opportunities have been and continue to be met by educators with innovation, collaboration, research, and new modes and modalities of teaching such as online video conferencing, simulation, virtual reality, flipped classes, and interprofessional assessment.

You are invited to share your learning and teaching innovations,  techniques, technology, assessment, and challenges with colleagues in this special edition of Pharmacy. The focus may include the development of new styles of assessment and examination of pharmacy students, new formats of workplace learning, development of core communication skills such as patient education and counselling, provision of new services, through to development of attributes such as empathy and social accountability.

We hope this Special Edition will encourage Australian and non-Australian Pharmacy Educators in hectic and uncertain times to curate and share their solutions to educational challenges, to adopt/adapt new practices, and to collaborate to address future opportunities.

Dr. Maree Donna Simpson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • problem solving
  • fit-for-purpose education
  • innovation
  • online learning
  • simulation
  • competency
  • accountability
  • student outcomes

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 1187 KiB  
Article
Self-Reflection and Peer-Assessments Effect on Pharmacy Students’ Performance at Simulated Counselling Sessions
Pharmacy 2023, 11(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy11010005 - 27 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2033
Abstract
Introduction: Verbal communication is a vital skill for pharmacists and essential for improving patient care. The aim of this study was to explore students’ perception of the impact of self-reflection and self- and peer-assessment on simulated patient counselling sessions. Methods: Focus groups explored [...] Read more.
Introduction: Verbal communication is a vital skill for pharmacists and essential for improving patient care. The aim of this study was to explore students’ perception of the impact of self-reflection and self- and peer-assessment on simulated patient counselling sessions. Methods: Focus groups explored student perceptions of how this course and way of learning has impacted their performance at counselling patients. Data were analysed using iterative inductive thematic analysis procedures and mapped to the self-determination theory. Results: Nine focus groups with 47 pharmacy students. We identified three main themes and ten associated subthemes. These were learning style (sub-themes gradual introduction to assessment, learning through self-reflection videos, authentic assessment, individual learning compared to group learning, and learning through observation of best practice), feedback (sub-themes inconsistent feedback, summative feedback, perception of self and relationship with peers informing peer assessment) and benefits in real life practice. These themes mapped well to self-determination theory and highlighted that additional focus may be required for benefits in real-life practice. Conclusion: Students’ perceptions of self-reflection and self- and peer-assessment centred on learning style, feedback, and benefits in real-life practice. Additional focus on benefits of this unit of study in real-life practice and work integrated learning on placements may further strengthen the impact of these learning activities. Full article
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