Low-Dimensional Nanocomposite Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 April 2024 | Viewed by 1089

Special Issue Editors

Division of Physics and Semiconductor Science, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul 04620, Republic of Korea
Interests: nanomaterials; SERS; sensors; energy harvesting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, Cockrell School of Engineering, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
Interests: electronics; bioelectronic devices; wearable electronics; sensors and actuators; advanced materials; energy harvesting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Carbon Composite Energy Nanomaterials Research Center, Woosuk University, Wanju-gun, Chonbuk 55338, Republic of Korea
Interests: energy storage and conversion applications; wastewater treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Energy harvesting and storage technologies are essential for sustainable development, as they convert ambient energy to electricity and store it to meet modern energy demands. Low-dimensional nanocomposite materials play a significant role in advancing energy harvesting and storage technologies, owing to their unique properties and capabilities achieved through the synergistic integration of low-dimensional nanomaterial fillers (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) with polymers or other materials. In triboelectric mechanical energy harvesting, low-dimensional nanocomposites facilitate the efficient generation of electricity through the contact and separation of materials based on the coupling of contact electrification and electrostatic induction. Furthermore, nanocomposite materials have revolutionized the field of supercapacitors by increasing the effective surface area of electrodes, resulting in increased specific capacitance, energy density, and cyclic lifespan. This novel approach not only increases the cycle life of supercapacitors but also increases their flexibility and adaptability for a wide range of applications.

This Special Issue offers a platform for researchers to share advancements in using low-dimensional nanocomposites for energy harvesting and storage technology. We cordially invite researchers and experts to contribute to this Special Issue with short communications, full research articles, and reviews focusing on advances in energy harvesting and storage technology.

Dr. Puran Pandey
Dr. Pukar Maharjan
Dr. Gunendra Prasad Ojha
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanocomposite materials
  • low dimensional nanocomposite
  • energy harvesting
  • energy conversion
  • triboelectric nanogenerator
  • self-powered System
  • energy storage
  • supercapacitors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

30 pages, 2619 KiB  
Review
Review of Piezoelectric Properties and Power Output of PVDF and Copolymer-Based Piezoelectric Nanogenerators
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(24), 3170; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13243170 - 18 Dec 2023
Viewed by 937
Abstract
The highest energy conversion efficiencies are typically shown by lead-containing piezoelectric materials, but the harmful environmental impacts of lead and its toxicity limit future use. At the bulk scale, lead-based piezoelectric materials have significantly higher piezoelectric properties when compared to lead-free piezoelectric materials. [...] Read more.
The highest energy conversion efficiencies are typically shown by lead-containing piezoelectric materials, but the harmful environmental impacts of lead and its toxicity limit future use. At the bulk scale, lead-based piezoelectric materials have significantly higher piezoelectric properties when compared to lead-free piezoelectric materials. However, at the nanoscale, the piezoelectric properties of lead-free piezoelectric material can be significantly larger than the bulk scale. The piezoelectric properties of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) lead-free piezoelectric nanomaterials are reviewed and their suitability for use in piezoelectric nanogenerators (PENGs) is determined. The impact of different PVDF/PVDF-TrFE composite structures on power output is explained. Strategies to improve the power output are given. Overall, this review finds that PVDF/PVDF-TrFE can have significantly increased piezoelectric properties at the nanoscale. However, these values are still lower than lead-free ceramics at the nanoscale. If the sole goal in developing a lead-free PENG is to maximize output power, lead-free ceramics at the nanoscale should be considered. However, lead-free ceramics are brittle, and thus encapsulation of lead-free ceramics in PVDF is a way to increase the flexibility of these PENGs. PVDF/PVDF-TrFE offers the advantage of being nontoxic and biocompatible, which is useful for many applications. Full article
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