Food Fermentations

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2023) | Viewed by 16442

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environment and Plant Protection, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine | USAMV Cluj, Mănăştur 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: fatty acids profiles; GC-MS; Solid-state fermentation; agro-industrial wastes/byproducts; food chemistry; agricultural chemistry
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Guest Editor

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Life Sciences, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Calea Mănăştur 3-5, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: food biotechnology; food fermentation; solid-state fermentation; cereal processing byproducts; waste valorization; food chemistry; biofilms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Institute of Life Sciences, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, 400372 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: Glycerol bioconversion into value-added products; fermentation processes; waste valorization; biofilms
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods constitute a great part of diets from all around the world. In the last decade, there has been an increasing consumer trend towards healthy foods, and fermented foods are very popular considering their enhanced nutritional properties and positive impact on the human gut via probiotic bacteria delivery. The enhanced nutritional character is due to the presence of bioactive molecules, vitamins, and other constituents with increased availability as a result of the process of fermentation. Fermented foods, with an accent on cereals, fruits, and legumes, are the result of the metabolic activity of a complex microbiota, consisting of the indigenous microorganisms naturally associated with the raw materials, and/or selected microorganisms (bacteria and yeasts) inoculated as starter cultures. Lactic acid bacteria and yeast might be considered to be efficient cell factories for the delivery of functional biomolecules and food ingredients for the production of specific classes of food products, such as high-quality gluten-free bread. The role of the microorganisms that are involved in the fermentation of bioactive compounds and their contribution to health-promoting properties are of interest. This Special Issue aims to contribute to the current knowledge in the field, and to provide the food industry with new insights into the development of value-added fermented foods products. Articles focusing on various aspects of food by-product utilization to recover valuable components are also welcomed.

Prof. Francisc Vasile Dulf
Prof. Dr. Dan C. Vodnar
Dr. Lavinia Calinoiu
Dr. Laura Mitrea
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • yeasts
  • fungi
  • lactic acid bacteria
  • bioactive molecules
  • fermented food and gut microbiota
  • food ingredients
  • food products
  • health benefits
  • agro food waste

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 1696 KiB  
Article
Non-Dairy Fermented Beverages Produced with Functional Lactic Acid Bacteria
by Medana Zamfir, Iulia-Roxana Angelescu, Catalina Voaides, Calina-Petruta Cornea, Oana Boiu-Sicuia and Silvia-Simona Grosu-Tudor
Microorganisms 2022, 10(12), 2314; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10122314 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2365
Abstract
At present, there is an increasing interest in beverages of non-dairy origin, as alternatives to those based on milk, but having similar health-promoting properties. Fermentation with specific bacteria or consortia may enhance the functionality of these products. In our study, selected lactic acid [...] Read more.
At present, there is an increasing interest in beverages of non-dairy origin, as alternatives to those based on milk, but having similar health-promoting properties. Fermentation with specific bacteria or consortia may enhance the functionality of these products. In our study, selected lactic acid bacteria, that have been previously shown to possess functional properties (antimicrobial activity, probiotic potential), were used for the fermentation of wheat bran combined with root vegetables. Strains were investigated for their safety, while the obtained beverages were characterized in terms of microbial content, physical, chemical, nutritional, and functional properties. None of the strains harbors virulence genes, but all of them possess genes for survival at low pH, starch metabolism, and vitamin biosynthesis. Three strains (Lactiplantibacillus plantarum BR9, L. plantarum P35, and Lactobacillus acidophilus IBB801) and two substrates (5% wheat bran with 10% red beetroot/carrots) were selected based on a preliminary assessment of the beverage’s sensory acceptability. These strains showed good growth and stability over time in the stored beverages. No enterobacteria were detected at the end of fermentations, while the final pH was, in most cases, below 3.5. Free phenolics, flavonoids, and DPPH scavenging effect increased during fermentation in all drinks, reaching 24h values that were much higher than in the unfermented substrates. Most of the obtained drinks were able to prevent the growth of certain pathogens, including Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19111, Salmonella enterica ATCC 14028, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922. The obtained beverages would combine the nutritiveness of the raw ingredients with the beneficial effect of fermentation (increasing shelf life, health-promoting effect, pleasant flavor, etc.). They would also fill a gap in the non-dairy probiotics sector, which is constantly increasing due to the increasing number of vegan people or people that cannot consume dairy products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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21 pages, 4416 KiB  
Article
Impact of Leavening Agent and Wheat Variety on Bread Organoleptic and Nutritional Quality
by Lauriane Mietton, Marie-Françoise Samson, Thérèse Marlin, Teddy Godet, Valérie Nolleau, Stéphane Guezenec, Diego Segond, Thibault Nidelet, Dominique Desclaux and Delphine Sicard
Microorganisms 2022, 10(7), 1416; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10071416 - 14 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2486
Abstract
Leavened bread can be made with different wheat varieties and leavening agents. Several studies have now demonstrated that each of these factors can play a role in bread quality. However, their relative impact in artisanal bread making remains to be elucidated. Here, we [...] Read more.
Leavened bread can be made with different wheat varieties and leavening agents. Several studies have now demonstrated that each of these factors can play a role in bread quality. However, their relative impact in artisanal bread making remains to be elucidated. Here, we assessed the impact of two wheat varieties as well as the impact of sourdoughs and yeasts on multiple components of bread organoleptic and nutritional quality. Using a participatory research approach including scientists and bakers, we compared breads leavened with three different sourdoughs and three different commercial yeasts as well as a mix of sourdough and yeast. Breads were made from two wheat varieties commonly used in organic farming: the variety “Renan” and the landrace “Barbu”. Except for bread minerals contents that mostly depended on wheat variety, bread quality was mostly driven by the fermenting agent. Sourdough breads had lower sugar and organic acids contents. These differences were mostly attributable to lower amounts of maltose and malate. They also had a higher proportion of soluble proteins than yeast breads, with specific aroma profiles. Finally, their aroma profiles were specific and more diverse compared to yeast breads. Interestingly, we also found significant nutritional and organoleptic quality differences between sourdough breads. These results highlight the value of sourdough bread and the role of sourdough microbial diversity in bread nutritional and organoleptic quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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13 pages, 1522 KiB  
Article
Fermentation in Pineapple Juice Significantly Enhances Ornithine and Citrulline Production in Lactococcus lactis MSC-3G Isolated from Sugarcane
by Yusuke Inoue, Narandalai Danshiitsoodol, Masafumi Noda, Katsushi Hagihara and Masanori Sugiyama
Microorganisms 2022, 10(5), 962; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10050962 - 03 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Lactic acid bacterial (LAB) fermentation of functional amino acids using fruit juices as a cultivation medium is not well-documented. In the present study, we successfully isolated a high ornithine- and citrulline-producing Lactococcus lactis strain, designated MSC-3G, from sugarcane and investigated the ornithine and [...] Read more.
Lactic acid bacterial (LAB) fermentation of functional amino acids using fruit juices as a cultivation medium is not well-documented. In the present study, we successfully isolated a high ornithine- and citrulline-producing Lactococcus lactis strain, designated MSC-3G, from sugarcane and investigated the ornithine and citrulline production profile using various fruit juices as a cultivation medium. Among fruit juices, pineapple juice exhibited the highest potentiality to initiate ornithine production (56 mM), while the highest citrulline yield was obtained during lime juice cultivation (34.5 mM). Under the optimal cultivation condition, the highest yield of ornithine and citrulline in pineapple juice reached 98.9 ± 2.2 mM and 211.1 ± 35.7 mM, respectively, both of which were significantly higher than that in the well-known industrial strain of Corynebacterium (C.) glutamicum. Additionally, citrulline production was dependent on oxygen supplementation and increased twofold when grown aerobically. Whole genome sequencing showed that the MSC-3G genome possesses the arginine deiminase (ADI) gene cluster arcABD1C1C2TD2. The results of the ADI pathway enzyme activities of MSC-3G showed a significant increase in arginine deiminase activity, while ornithine carbamoyl transferase activity was decreased, which in turn indicates the high citrulline-accumulation ability of MSC-3G when cultivated in pineapple juice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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14 pages, 1360 KiB  
Article
Technological Parameters, Anti-Listeria Activity, Biogenic Amines Formation and Degradation Ability of L. plantarum Strains Isolated from Sheep-Fermented Sausage
by Nicoletta P. Mangia, Michele Cottu, Maria E. Mura, Marco A. Murgia and Giuseppe Blaiotta
Microorganisms 2021, 9(9), 1895; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9091895 - 07 Sep 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2042
Abstract
The aim of this work was to identify and characterize, from a technological and safety point of view, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional sheep-fermented sausage. First, LABs were identified then were screened for some technological parameters such as acidifying and [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to identify and characterize, from a technological and safety point of view, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from traditional sheep-fermented sausage. First, LABs were identified then were screened for some technological parameters such as acidifying and growth ability, proteolytic and lipolytic activity and for antimicrobial activity. Finally, biogenic amine production and degradation abilities were also evaluated. This research reveals the predominance of Lactiplantibacillus (L.) plantarum on LAB community. Almost all L. plantarum strains were active against Listeria monocytogenes strains (inhibition zone diameters > 1 cm). None of the tested strains were positive in histidine (hdcA), lysine (ldc) and tyrosine (tyrdc) decarboxylase genes and only one (L. plantarum PT9-2) was positive to the agmatine deiminase (agdi) gene. Furthermore, given the positive results of the sufl (multi-copper oxidase) gene detection, all strains showed a potential degradation ability of biogenic amines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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16 pages, 1614 KiB  
Article
Probiotic Lactobacilli in Fermented Dairy Products: Selective Detection, Enumeration and Identification Scheme
by Nasim Farahmand, Labia I. I. Ouoba, Shahram Naghizadeh Raeisi, Jane Sutherland and Hamid B. Ghoddusi
Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1600; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081600 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3237
Abstract
A selection of 36 commercial probiotic fermented dairy products from UK and Europe markets were evaluated for the numbers, types, and viability of Lactobacillus strains against the stated information on their packages. A comparative study was carried out on selectivity of MRS-Clindamycin, MRS-Sorbitol, [...] Read more.
A selection of 36 commercial probiotic fermented dairy products from UK and Europe markets were evaluated for the numbers, types, and viability of Lactobacillus strains against the stated information on their packages. A comparative study was carried out on selectivity of MRS-Clindamycin, MRS-Sorbitol, and MRS-IM Maltose, to select the right medium for enumeration of probiotic Lactobacillus. Based on selectivity of medium for recovery of the targeted lactobacilli, and also simplicity of preparation, MRS-Clindamycin was chosen as the best medium for enumeration of probiotic Lactobacillus in fermented milks. The results of enumeration of lactobacilli showed that 22 out of a total 36 tested products contained more than 106 colony-forming units/g at the end of their shelf life, which comply with the recommended minimum therapeutic level for probiotics. Rep-PCR using primer GTG-5 was applied for initial discrimination of isolated strains, and isolates, which presented different band profile, were placed in different groups. The isolated Lactobacillus spp. were identified mainly as Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus paracasei by analysis of partial sequences of the 16S ribosomal RNA and rpoA genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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22 pages, 10176 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of the Estimation Capability of Response Surface Methodology and Artificial Neural Network for the Optimization of Bacteriocin-Like Inhibitory Substances Production by Lactococcus lactis Gh1
by Roslina Jawan, Sahar Abbasiliasi, Joo Shun Tan, Mohd Rizal Kapri, Shuhaimi Mustafa, Murni Halim and Arbakariya B. Ariff
Microorganisms 2021, 9(3), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9030579 - 12 Mar 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2505
Abstract
Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced by Lactococcus lactis Gh1 had shown antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313. Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth is used for the cultivation and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, but there is a need to improve the current [...] Read more.
Bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances (BLIS) produced by Lactococcus lactis Gh1 had shown antimicrobial activity against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313. Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth is used for the cultivation and enumeration of lactic acid bacteria, but there is a need to improve the current medium composition for enhancement of BLIS production, and one of the approaches is to model the optimization process and identify the most appropriate medium formulation. Response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN) models were employed in this study. In medium optimization, ANN (R2 = 0.98) methodology provided better estimation point and data fitting as compared to RSM (R2 = 0.79). In ANN, the optimal medium consisted of 35.38 g/L soytone, 16 g/L fructose, 3.25 g/L sodium chloride (NaCl) and 5.40 g/L disodium phosphate (Na2HPO4). BLIS production in optimal medium (717.13 ± 0.76 AU/mL) was about 1.40-fold higher than that obtained in nonoptimised (520.56 ± 3.37 AU/mL) medium. BLIS production was further improved by about 1.18 times higher in 2 L stirred tank bioreactor (787.40 ± 1.30 AU/mL) as compared to that obtained in 250 mL shake flask (665.28 ± 14.22 AU/mL) using the optimised medium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Fermentations)
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