Clinical Implications of Microbial Biofilm 2.0

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Biofilm".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4775

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies and Technology (CAST), Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: biofilm formation; cystic fibrosis; lung infections; antibiotic resistance; antimicrobial compounds; Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies and Technology (CAST), Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: biofilm formation; cystic fibrosis; lung infections; probiotics; antibiotic resistance; antimicrobial compounds; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia; bacterial pathogenesis; microbial cooperation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The concept that microbial biofilms can enable the survival of microorganisms in various compartments of the human body, as well as on the surface of prostheses and therapeutic devices, is strongly supported by in vitro studies, which have increased exponentially over the past two decades.

However, our understanding of the natural history of this important bacterial growth phenotype remains limited. While biofilms have been demonstrated in vitro in numerous studies, it is worth noting that, with rare exceptions, biofilms were not perfectly correlated with disease.

Most of these studies consist, in fact, of basic science investigation, surveys of clinical isolate collections, with limited clinical relevance, as they do not shed light on the influence of the biofilm phenotype on the clinical outcomes of infected human patients. Furthermore, they suffer from a lack of standardization in biofilm laboratory methods, which makes it difficult to make a meaningful comparison of data across studies and species, and is probably the reason that conflicting results arose from studies looking for an association between biofilm-forming bacteria and more severe clinical outcomes.

More informative clinical studies correlating biofilm formation to patient data, and indicating biofilm phenotype as a risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes are needed, both to advance our understanding of the role of biofilms in human disease and to identify new therapeutic strategies/targets.

For these reasons, this Special Issue welcomes research articles, review articles, short communications and case reports focused mainly (but not only) on the following:

  • mechanisms underlying the antimicrobial tolerance of biofilm communities;
  • mechanisms in which bacterial biofilms evade, dampen, or actively counterattack the host immune response;
  • definition of clinical indicators for biofilm formation (i.e., failure of appropriate antibiotic treatment, recalcitrance to appropriate antibiotic treatment, recurrence of delayed healing on cessation of antibiotic treatment, and unresponsiveness to antimicrobial therapy);
  • in vitro predictors of biofilm formation and therapeutic outcomes for biofilm-related infections;
  • non-device-related chronic biofilm disease;
  • device-related biofilm disease;
  • biofilm-related device malfunction;
  • classic (antibiotic treatment) and alternative therapeutic strategies to combat biofilm-related infections;
  • evaluation of the clinical impact of biofilm formation in human and animal studies;
  • standardization of in vitro and in vivo models that allow for biofilm formation under environmental conditions similar to the infection site.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Di Bonaventura
Dr. Arianna Pompilio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microorganisms is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • biofilms
  • clinical studies
  • biofilm microbial interaction
  • biofilm-related infections device-related biofilm diseases
  • antibiotic tolerance
  • host immune response evasion
  • biofilm clinical indicators

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

28 pages, 3088 KiB  
Review
Microbial Biofilms: Applications, Clinical Consequences, and Alternative Therapies
by Asghar Ali, Andaleeb Zahra, Mohan Kamthan, Fohad Mabood Husain, Thamer Albalawi, Mohammad Zubair, Roba Alatawy, Mohammad Abid and Md Salik Noorani
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 1934; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11081934 - 29 Jul 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 4084
Abstract
Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms that grow on surfaces and are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. These are prevalent in various natural and man-made environments, ranging from industrial settings to medical devices, where they can have both positive and [...] Read more.
Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms that grow on surfaces and are embedded in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. These are prevalent in various natural and man-made environments, ranging from industrial settings to medical devices, where they can have both positive and negative impacts. This review explores the diverse applications of microbial biofilms, their clinical consequences, and alternative therapies targeting these resilient structures. We have discussed beneficial applications of microbial biofilms, including their role in wastewater treatment, bioremediation, food industries, agriculture, and biotechnology. Additionally, we have highlighted the mechanisms of biofilm formation and clinical consequences of biofilms in the context of human health. We have also focused on the association of biofilms with antibiotic resistance, chronic infections, and medical device-related infections. To overcome these challenges, alternative therapeutic strategies are explored. The review examines the potential of various antimicrobial agents, such as antimicrobial peptides, quorum-sensing inhibitors, phytoextracts, and nanoparticles, in targeting biofilms. Furthermore, we highlight the future directions for research in this area and the potential of phytotherapy for the prevention and treatment of biofilm-related infections in clinical settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Implications of Microbial Biofilm 2.0)
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