Understanding Bacterial Biofilm Formation Mechanisms for Novel Therapeutic Applications

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Biofilm".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2023) | Viewed by 4077

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies and Technology (CAST), Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: biofilm formation; cystic fibrosis; lung infections; antibiotic resistance; antimicrobial compounds; Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, Center for Advanced Studies and Technology (CAST), Gabriele d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: biofilm formation; cystic fibrosis; lung infections; probiotics; antibiotic resistance; antimicrobial compounds; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Stenotrophomonas maltophilia; bacterial pathogenesis; microbial cooperation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

The aim of this Special Issue is to gain new insights into mechanisms underlying bacterial biofilm development on abiotic and biotic surfaces. This knowledge is needed to define new target and novel approaches to prevent biofilm formation or eradicate existing biofilm.

Dear Colleagues,

Biofilms are communities of surface-attached microorganisms playing a significant role in the persistence of bacterial infections due to their intrinsic resistance to antibiotics. Biofilms are involved in up to 80% of human microbial infections and are also associated with medical implants. Despite this, currently, the management of biofilm infections remains challenging since currently there are no specific approaches that specifically target bacterial biofilms. This is probably because, until recently, the molecular details of biofilm formation were poorly studied and consequently understood.

We are pleased to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue, aimed at gaining new mechanistic insights into the three stages, i.e., attachment, maturation, and dispersion, that lead to biofilm formation in many bacteria onto abiotic (e.g., biomedical prosthesis) and biotic (e.g., epithelia) surfaces. Comprehending the molecular, metabolic, and genetic details underlying biofilm formation will make identifying novel targets and strategies with therapeutic potential easier.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Genetic and metabolic mechanisms underlying biofilm development;
  • Influence of the physicochemical environmental factors on biofilm development;
  • Composition (e.g., exopolysaccharides, extracellular proteins, eDNA) and architectural features of biofilms;
  • Signaling in biofilm formation (e.g., quorum sensing, C-di-GMP, small noncoding RNAs);
  • Mechanisms of biofilm detachment (e.g., streamer formation).

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Giovanni Di Bonaventura
Dr. Arianna Pompilio
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bacterial biofilm
  • biofilm formation
  • bacterial adhesion
  • biofilm detachment
  • medical devices
  • chronic infections
  • antibiotic-resistance
  • biofilm signaling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2031 KiB  
Article
Resistance and Biofilm Production Profile of Potential Isolated from Kpètè-Kpètè Used to Produce Traditional Fermented Beer
by Christine N’Tcha, Haziz Sina, Dyana Ndiade Bourobou, S. M. Ismaël Hoteyi, Bawa Boya, Raoul Agnimonhan, Jacques François Mavoungou, Adolphe Adjanohoun, Olubukola Oluranti Babalola and Lamine Baba-Moussa
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 1939; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11081939 - 29 Jul 2023
Viewed by 941
Abstract
This study aimed to characterize the pathogenicity of bacteria isolated from the starter of two traditional beers produced and consumed in Benin. After standard microbial identification, species were identified by specific biochemical tests such as catalase, coagulase, and API 20 E. Antibiotic sensitivity [...] Read more.
This study aimed to characterize the pathogenicity of bacteria isolated from the starter of two traditional beers produced and consumed in Benin. After standard microbial identification, species were identified by specific biochemical tests such as catalase, coagulase, and API 20 E. Antibiotic sensitivity was tested according to the French Society of Microbiology Antibiogram Committee. The crystal violet microplate technique evaluated the biofilm production and conventional PCR was used to identify genes encoding virulence and macrolide resistance. According to our data, the traditional starter known as kpètè-kpètè that is used to produce beer is contaminated by Enterobacteriaceae and staphylococci species. Thus, 28.43% of the isolated bacteria were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), and 10.93% coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). Six species such as Klebsiella terrigena (1.38%), Enterobacter aerogens (4.14%), Providencia rettgeri (5.51%), Chryseomonas luteola (6.89%), Serratia rubidae (15.16%), and Enterobacter cloacae (27.56%) were identified among Enterobacteriaceae. Those bacterial strains are multi-resistant to conventional antibiotics. The hight capability of produced biofilms was recorded with Enterobacter aerogens, Klebsiella terrigena (100%), Providencia rettgeri (75%), and Staphylococcus spp (60%). Enterobacter cloacae (4%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (5.55%) harbor the macrolide resistance gene. For other strains, these genes were not detected. Foods contaminated with bacteria resistant to antibiotics and carrying a virulence gene could constitute a potential public health problem. There is a need to increase awareness campaigns on hygiene rules in preparing and selling these traditional beers. Full article
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20 pages, 2145 KiB  
Article
Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Protein Patterns of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia in Biofilm and Planktonic Lifestyles
by Giovanni Di Bonaventura, Carla Picciani, Veronica Lupetti and Arianna Pompilio
Microorganisms 2023, 11(2), 442; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11020442 - 9 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1542
Abstract
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a clinically relevant bacterial pathogen, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Despite the well-known ability to form biofilms inherently resistant to antibiotics and host immunity, many aspects involved in S. maltophilia biofilm formation are yet to be elucidated. In the present [...] Read more.
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a clinically relevant bacterial pathogen, particularly in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Despite the well-known ability to form biofilms inherently resistant to antibiotics and host immunity, many aspects involved in S. maltophilia biofilm formation are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, a proteomic approach was used to elucidate the differential protein expression patterns observed during the planktonic-to-biofilm transition of S. maltophilia Sm126, a strong biofilm producer causing chronic infection in a CF patient, to identify determinants potentially associated with S. maltophilia biofilm formation. In all, 57 proteins were differentially (3-fold; p < 0.01) expressed in biofilm cells compared with planktonic counterparts: 38 were overexpressed, and 19 were down-expressed. It is worth noting that 34 proteins were exclusively found in biofilm, mainly associated with quorum sensing-mediated intercellular communication, augmented glycolysis, amino acid metabolism, biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, phosphate signaling, response to nutrient starvation, and general stress. Further work is warranted to evaluate if these proteins can be suitable targets for developing anti-biofilm strategies effective against S. maltophilia. Full article
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