Laser Micromachining of Metals

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2019) | Viewed by 10068

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of micromanufacturing processes and systems over the past ten years has seen phenomenal advances in the theory and practice of using lasers to produce highly functional surfaces in metals. The processing of metals using laser beams is a fast and efficient method of producing high value products, but is not without its limitations. This Special Issue is dedicated to understanding the application and use of lasers to machine metals at the microscale and focuses on the successes and the challenges of processing metals in a sustainable manner that preserves the earth’s natural resources and extends the life of functional systems. Original research articles and reviews are solicited for this Special Issue of Metals that provides a view of the current state-of-the-art or a projected view of the future for laser micromachining of metals. Case studies of industrial use of lasers to machine metals are also solicited so that the reader of this special issue can appreciate how lasers are used to machine a variety of metals for specific industrial applications.

Prof. Dr. Mark Jackson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Lasers
  • Micromachining
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Metals
  • Materials
  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Semiconductors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 4005 KiB  
Article
Time-Dependent Anisotropic Wetting Behavior of Deterministic Structures of Different Strut Widths on Ti6Al4V
by Georg Schnell, Christopher Jagow, Armin Springer, Marcus Frank and Hermann Seitz
Metals 2019, 9(9), 938; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9090938 - 27 Aug 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3039
Abstract
This study investigated the wetting behavior of Ti6Al4V surfaces that were groove-structured by means of femtosecond laser irradiation. The material was treated under ambient air conditions by use of a laser wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 300 fs. Highly [...] Read more.
This study investigated the wetting behavior of Ti6Al4V surfaces that were groove-structured by means of femtosecond laser irradiation. The material was treated under ambient air conditions by use of a laser wavelength of 1030 nm and a pulse duration of 300 fs. Highly accurate structures with a gap width of 20 µm, a gap depth of 10 µm, and varying strut widths (1–300 µm) were generated and the contact angles in parallel and perpendicular direction were determined using sessile drop method with ultrapure water 1, 8, and 15 days after irradiation. All deterministic surfaces exhibited a pronounced contact angle change over time. The structures showed a strong anisotropic wetting behavior with a maximum contact angle aspect ratio of 2.47 at a strut width of 40 µm and a maximum difference between the parallel and perpendicular contact angle of 47.9° after 1 day. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Micromachining of Metals)
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11 pages, 2117 KiB  
Article
Hybrid Nanosecond Laser Processing and Heat Treatment for Rapid Preparation of Super-Hydrophobic Copper Surface
by Linxu Ma, Lina Wang, Chengying Li, Jian Guo, Pranav Shrotriya, Cui Deng and Jingnan Zhao
Metals 2019, 9(6), 668; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9060668 - 09 Jun 2019
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 3438
Abstract
The super-hydrophobic copper surface was obtained by using a nanosecond pulsed laser. Different micro- and nano-structures were fabricated by changing the laser scanning interval and scanning speed, before heating in an electric heater at 150 °C for two hours to explore the effect [...] Read more.
The super-hydrophobic copper surface was obtained by using a nanosecond pulsed laser. Different micro- and nano-structures were fabricated by changing the laser scanning interval and scanning speed, before heating in an electric heater at 150 °C for two hours to explore the effect of laser parameters and heat treatment on the wettability of the copper surface. It was found that the laser-treated copper surface is super-hydrophilic, and then, after the heat treatment, the surface switches to hydrophobic or even super-hydrophobic. The best super-hydrophobic surface’s apparent contact angle (APCA) was 155.6°, and the water sliding angle (WSA) was 4°. Super-hydrophobic copper is corrosion-resistant, self-cleaning, and dust-proof, and can be widely used in various mechanical devices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Micromachining of Metals)
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14 pages, 7496 KiB  
Article
Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Fiber Welded Socket-Joint Made of Powder Metallurgy Molybdenum Alloy
by Miao-Xia Xie, Yan-Xin Li, Xiang-Tao Shang, Xue-Wu Wang and Jun-Yu Pei
Metals 2019, 9(6), 640; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9060640 - 02 Jun 2019
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2916
Abstract
Fiber welding of socket-joints made of nanostructured high-performance molybdenum alloy (NS Mo) was carried out to get a better understanding of the role of welding heat input. It was found that low heat input (i.e., high welding speed) resulted in significantly refined grains [...] Read more.
Fiber welding of socket-joints made of nanostructured high-performance molybdenum alloy (NS Mo) was carried out to get a better understanding of the role of welding heat input. It was found that low heat input (i.e., high welding speed) resulted in significantly refined grains in the fusion zone (FZ) of fiber laser welded NS Mo joints. When welding heat input decreased from 3600 J/cm (i.e., 1.2 kW, 20 cm/min) to 250 J/cm (i.e., 2.5 kW, 600 cm/min), the tensile strength of welded joints increased from about 250 MPa to about 570 MPa. It was confirmed by energy spectrum analysis that the higher the welding heat input, the higher the oxygen contents at the grain boundary (GB) within the FZ. In addition, the most important reason for poor strength of welded joints of Mo alloys was reported as being that MoO2 was segregated on the grain boundary. Therefore, it was concluded that welding under low heat input (i.e., high welding speed) was able to reduce the segregation degree of MoO2 at the grain boundary by refining grains and increasing the total area of GBs, thus improving the strength of welded joints and reducing the proportion of the intergranular fracture zone in tensile fractures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Laser Micromachining of Metals)
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