materials-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II)

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Metals and Alloys".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 6682

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083, China
Interests: light alloys (Al-, Mg-); Ni-based super alloys; high-entropy alloys; CALPHAD; phase-field modeling; machine learning; alloy design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Light alloys (Al-, Mg-, and Ti-based) and high-temperature alloys are widely used as key engineering materials in both civil and military industries due to their excellent comprehensive properties and performance. To meet the growing demand for the properties/performance of the materials, there is a perpetual need to explore novel, light and high-temperature alloys. This Special Issue of Materials is accepting papers on any new progress/development in the fields of light and high-temperature alloys. Both research and review articles are welcome.

This Special Issue primarily covers all of the theoretical and experimental investigations into different types of light alloys, including Al-, Mg-, and Ti-based, and high-temperature alloys, including Ni-, Co-, Fe-, and Nb-based. Either the mechanical or functional behaviors at all length scales can be emphasized. Related topics, such as protective coatings on high-temperature alloys, metal matrix composites, and so on, also fall within the scope of this Special Issue. Moreover, research into new high-temperature alloys, i.e., high-entropy alloys or multi-principal element alloys, is also welcome.

Thank you very much, and I look forward to receiving your submission soon.

Prof. Dr. Lijun Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • light alloys (Al-, Mg-, and Ti-based)
  • high-temperature alloys (Ni-, Co-, Fe-, and Nb-based)
  • high-entropy alloys
  • light/high-temperature alloy-based composites
  • microstructure
  • mechanical properties
  • corrosion and oxidation
  • phase equilibrium and diffusion
  • alloy design
  • integrated computational materials engineering

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

16 pages, 5795 KiB  
Article
A First-Principles Study of Mechanical and Electronic Properties of Cr0.5-xAl0.5TMxN Hard Coatings (TM = Ti, V, Y, Zr, Hf, and Ta)
by Weike Dai, You Zou, Jiong Wang, Yue Su and Donglan Zhang
Materials 2024, 17(5), 1070; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma17051070 - 26 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 444
Abstract
The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of cubic Cr0.5-xAl0.5TMxN, doped with TM (transition metal) elements (TM = Ti, V, Y, Zr, Hf, and Ta) at low concentrations (x = 0.03 and 0.06), was investigated by first-principles calculations. [...] Read more.
The structural, mechanical, and electronic properties of cubic Cr0.5-xAl0.5TMxN, doped with TM (transition metal) elements (TM = Ti, V, Y, Zr, Hf, and Ta) at low concentrations (x = 0.03 and 0.06), was investigated by first-principles calculations. The results of the structural properties calculations reveal that the addition of Ti, Y, Hf, Zr, and Ta expand the volume, while V has the opposite effect. All doped compounds are thermodynamically stable, and Cr0.5-xAl0.5TMxN with TM = Ti is energetically more favorable than other doped compounds. At the same doping concentration, Cr0.5-xAl0.5VxN possesses the highest stiffness, hardness, and resistance to external forces due to its greatest mechanical properties, and Cr0.5-xAl0.5TaxN possesses the highest elastic anisotropy and the lowest Young’s modulus. Substituting Cr atoms with TM atoms in a stepwise manner results in a decrease in the bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young’s modulus, and theoretical hardness of Cr0.5-xAl0.5TMxN, while increasing its toughness. Based on the calculation results of the total and partial density of states of Cr0.5Al0.5N and Cr0.47Al0.5TM0.03N, all compounds exhibit metallic behavior as indicated by the finite density of states at the Fermi level. The contribution of Ti-3d, V-3d, and Ta-3d orbitals at Fermi level is significantly higher than that of other TM atoms, resulting in a more pronounced metallic character for Cr0.47Al0.5Ti0.03N, Cr0.47Al0.5V0.03N, and Cr0.47Al0.5Ta0.03N. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 6264 KiB  
Article
The Microstructure, Solidification Path, and Microhardness of As-Cast Ni-Al-Cr-Os Alloys in a Ni-Rich Region
by Yan Lin, Ming Wei, Guangyu Yang, Haiyan Liu, Hui Ye, Chunming Deng and Lijun Zhang
Materials 2023, 16(20), 6777; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16206777 - 20 Oct 2023
Viewed by 758
Abstract
In this study, nine as-cast Ni-Al-Cr-Os alloys were prepared, and their constituent phases and microstructure were examined using X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis techniques. The solidification paths of all the alloys in a Ni-rich corner were revealed based on a detailed analysis [...] Read more.
In this study, nine as-cast Ni-Al-Cr-Os alloys were prepared, and their constituent phases and microstructure were examined using X-ray diffraction and electron probe microanalysis techniques. The solidification paths of all the alloys in a Ni-rich corner were revealed based on a detailed analysis of the as-cast microstructure. The liquidus cube of the quaternary Ni-Al-Cr-Os system in a Ni-rich corner was established accordingly. A eutectic-type invariant reaction on the liquidus surface was explicitly identified, and its reaction can be expressed as L → α + β + γ. No quaternary invariant reaction was found in the alloys following the addition of Os. The Ni-Al-Cr-Os alloy points were then vertically mapped onto the Ni-Al-Cr liquid phase projection to better observe the effect of Os addition on the solidification path of the Ni-Al-Cr system. It was found that the addition of a small amount of Os has no significant effect on the solidification path of the Ni-Al-Cr system. Furthermore, the microhardness of each alloy, which was determined to be in the range of 207 HV to 565 HV, was found to be closely related to the phase constitution and phase fraction of the alloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 7580 KiB  
Article
An Improved Grain Growth Model and Its Application in Gradient Heat Treatment of Aero-Engine Turbine Discs
by Zhaofeng Liu, Chao Wang, Junyi Cheng and Jianzheng Guo
Materials 2023, 16(19), 6584; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16196584 - 6 Oct 2023
Viewed by 796
Abstract
A new grain growth model was developed by introducing the ultimate grain size to the traditional model. The grain growth behavior and its ultimate size under the Zenner pinning force are also discussed. This model was applied to the nickel-based superalloy and integrated [...] Read more.
A new grain growth model was developed by introducing the ultimate grain size to the traditional model. The grain growth behavior and its ultimate size under the Zenner pinning force are also discussed. This model was applied to the nickel-based superalloy and integrated into an FEM code. The grain evolution of a forged third-generation powder superalloy heat treated at different temperatures and holding times was studied. A gradient heat treatment setup was designed and implemented for a full-size turbine disc based on the model prediction to meet the accurate dual-microstructure requirements of an advanced aero-engine turbine disc design. The predicted temperature was validated by thermal couple measurements. The relative error between the prediction and the measurements is less than 2%. The metallographic examination of the whole turbine disk through sectioning showed that the grain size was ASTM 7-8 at the rim area and ASTM 11-12 at the bore region, which agrees well with the prediction. The predicted values of the three measurement areas are ASTM 12.1, ASTM 9.1, and ASTM 7.1, respectively, with a maximum error of 5% compared to the measured values. The proposed model was validated and successfully applied to help manufacture a dual-microstructure aero-engine turbine disc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 9430 KiB  
Article
First-Principles Study on Structure and Stability of GP Zones in Al-Mg-Si(-Cu) Alloy
by Yue Su, Shaozhi He, Jiong Wang, Donglan Zhang and Qing Wu
Materials 2023, 16(11), 3897; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16113897 - 23 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1253
Abstract
Nanostructured Guinier–Preston (GP) zones are critical for the strength of Al-Mg-Si(-Cu) aluminum alloys. However, there are controversial reports about the structure and growth mechanism of GP zones. In this study, we construct several atomic configurations of GP zones according to the previous research. [...] Read more.
Nanostructured Guinier–Preston (GP) zones are critical for the strength of Al-Mg-Si(-Cu) aluminum alloys. However, there are controversial reports about the structure and growth mechanism of GP zones. In this study, we construct several atomic configurations of GP zones according to the previous research. Then first-principles calculations based on density functional theory were used to investigate the relatively stable atomic structure and GP-zones growth mechanism. The results show that on the (100) plane, GP zones consist of {MgSi} atomic layers without Al atoms, and the size tends to grow up to 2 nm. Along the (100) growth direction, even numbers of {MgSi} atomic layers are more energetically favorable and there exist Al atomic layers to relieve the lattice strain. {MgSi}2Al4 is the most energetically favorable GP-zones configuration, and the substitution sequence of Cu atoms in {MgSi}2Al4 during the aging process is Al → Si → Mg. The growth of GP zones is accompanied by the increase in Mg and Si solute atoms and the decrease in Al atoms. Point defects, such as Cu atoms and vacancies, exhibit different occupation tendencies in GP zones: Cu atoms tend to segregate in the Al layer near the GP zones, while vacancies tend to be captured by the GP zones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 12615 KiB  
Article
Atomic-Scale Insights into the Deformation Mechanism of the Microstructures in Precipitation-Strengthening Alloys
by Chenshuang Wei, Sai Tang, Yi Kong, Xiong Shuai, Hong Mao and Yong Du
Materials 2023, 16(5), 1841; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16051841 - 23 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1287
Abstract
Clarifying the deformation behaviors of microstructures could greatly help us understand the precipitation-strengthening mechanism in alloys. However, it is still a formidable challenge to study the slow plastic deformation of alloys at the atomic scale. In this work, the phase-field crystal method was [...] Read more.
Clarifying the deformation behaviors of microstructures could greatly help us understand the precipitation-strengthening mechanism in alloys. However, it is still a formidable challenge to study the slow plastic deformation of alloys at the atomic scale. In this work, the phase-field crystal method was used to investigate the interactions between precipitates, grain boundary, and dislocation during the deformation processes at different degrees of lattice misfits and strain rates. The results demonstrate that the pinning effect of precipitates becomes increasingly strong with the increase of lattice misfit at relatively slow deformation with a strain rate of 10−4. The cut regimen prevails under the interaction between coherent precipitates and dislocations. In the case of a large lattice misfit of 19.3%, the dislocations tend to move toward the incoherent phase interface and are absorbed. The deformation behavior of the precipitate-matrix phase interface was also investigated. Collaborative deformation is observed in coherent and semi-coherent interfaces, while incoherent precipitate deforms independently of the matrix grains. The faster deformations (strain rate is 10−2) with different lattice misfits all are characterized by the generation of a large number of dislocations and vacancies. The results contribute to important insights into the fundamental issue about how the microstructures of precipitation-strengthening alloys deform collaboratively or independently under different lattice misfits and deformation rates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 5084 KiB  
Article
Ti–15Zr and Ti–15Zr–5Mo Biomaterials Alloys: An Analysis of Corrosion and Tribocorrosion Behavior in Phosphate-Buffered Saline Solution
by Adriana Alencar Santos, Jean Valdir Uchôa Teixeira, Carlos Alberto Fonzar Pintão, Diego Rafael Nespeque Correa, Carlos Roberto Grandini and Paulo Noronha Lisboa-Filho
Materials 2023, 16(5), 1826; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma16051826 - 23 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
It is crucial for clinical needs to develop novel titanium alloys feasible for long-term use as orthopedic and dental prostheses to prevent adverse implications and further expensive procedures. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior in [...] Read more.
It is crucial for clinical needs to develop novel titanium alloys feasible for long-term use as orthopedic and dental prostheses to prevent adverse implications and further expensive procedures. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the corrosion and tribocorrosion behavior in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of two recently developed titanium alloys, Ti–15Zr and Ti–15Zr–5Mo (wt.%) and compare them with the commercially pure titanium grade 4 (CP–Ti G4). Density, XRF, XRD, OM, SEM, and Vickers microhardness analyses were conducted to give details about the phase composition and the mechanical properties. Additionally, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to supplement the corrosion studies, while confocal microscopy and SEM imaging of the wear track were used to evaluate the tribocorrosion mechanisms. As a result, the Ti–15Zr (α + α′ phase) and Ti–15Zr–5Mo (α″ + β phase) samples exhibited advantageous properties compared to CP–Ti G4 in the electrochemical and tribocorrosion tests. Moreover, a better recovery capacity of the passive oxide layer was observed in the studied alloys. These results open new horizons for biomedical applications of Ti–Zr–Mo alloys, such as dental and orthopedical prostheses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Light Alloys and High-Temperature Alloys (Volume II))
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop