Marine Skeletal Biopolymers and Proteins 2

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (6 May 2022) | Viewed by 26748

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine skeletal biopolymers and proteins have a great potential application in the medical field. The skeletal biopolymers include chitin and chitosan, collagen, cellulose, and various polysaccharides. The marine skeletal proteins, for instance, calcium-binding proteins, marine enzymes, and various candidate proteins for drug discovery from the calcifying marine organisms, due to their broad spectrum of biological functions into biopolymer and protein-based drugs and bioactivities, such as anticancer, antimicrobial, bone tissue regeneration, antioxidant, and anti-aging activities, bioactive skeletal proteins and biopolymer, have recently gained a great amount of interest in the pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and cosmeceutical industries. Marine skeletal proteins are also a very rich source of amino acids, which are essential for building good health.

Researchers around the world have found that the biopolymers, proteins, and peptides extracted from marine calcifiers are the most convenient and safest sources. The advantages of this source are the huge availability and abundance in the shallow, mid-level, and deep-sea waters. This source includes marine invertebrates and related calcifiers, for example, soft and hard corals, mollusks/bivalves, sponges, sea urchins, coralline red algae, and other calcifying marine organisms.

Dr. Azizur Rahman
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine proteins and peptides
  • biopolymers
  • corals
  • sponges
  • sea urchins
  • mollusks/bivalves
  • marine algae
  • marine collagen
  • marine chitin
  • marine polysaccharides
  • marine bioactive compounds
  • marine biotechnology
  • marine biomaterials
  • proteomics

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

21 pages, 4877 KiB  
Article
Adsorption of Cationic Dyes on a Magnetic 3D Spongin Scaffold with Nano-Sized Fe3O4 Cores
by Maryam Akbari, Hessam Jafari, Mojtaba Rostami, Gholam Reza Mahdavinia, Ali Sobhani nasab, Dmitry Tsurkan, Iaroslav Petrenko, Mohammad Reza Ganjali, Mehdi Rahimi-Nasrabadi and Hermann Ehrlich
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(9), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19090512 - 09 Sep 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2560
Abstract
The renewable, proteinaceous, marine biopolymer spongin is yet the focus of modern research. The preparation of a magnetic three-dimensional (3D) spongin scaffold with nano-sized Fe3O4 cores is reported here for the first time. The formation of this magnetic spongin–Fe3 [...] Read more.
The renewable, proteinaceous, marine biopolymer spongin is yet the focus of modern research. The preparation of a magnetic three-dimensional (3D) spongin scaffold with nano-sized Fe3O4 cores is reported here for the first time. The formation of this magnetic spongin–Fe3O4 composite was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA) (TGA-DTA), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and zeta potential analyses. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) confirmed the formation of well-dispersed spherical nanoparticles tightly bound to the spongin scaffold. The magnetic spongin–Fe3O4 composite showed significant removal efficiency for two cationic dyes (i.e., crystal violet (CV) and methylene blue (MB)). Adsorption experiments revealed that the prepared material is a fast, high-capacity (77 mg/g), yet selective adsorbent for MB. This behavior was attributed to the creation of strong electrostatic interactions between the spongin–Fe3O4 and MB or CV, which was reflected by adsorption mechanism evaluations. The adsorption of MB and CV was found to be a function of pH, with maximum removal performance being observed over a wide pH range (pH = 5.5–11). In this work, we combined Fe3O4 nanoparticles and spongin scaffold properties into one unique composite, named magnetic spongin scaffold, in our attempt to create a sustainable absorbent for organic wastewater treatment. The appropriative mechanism of adsorption of the cationic dyes on a magnetic 3D spongin scaffold is proposed. Removal of organic dyes and other contaminants is essential to ensure healthy water and prevent various diseases. On the other hand, in many cases, dyes are used as models to demonstrate the adsorption properties of nanostructures. Due to the good absorption properties of magnetic spongin, it can be proposed as a green and uncomplicated adsorbent for the removal of different organic contaminants and, furthermore, as a carrier in drug delivery applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Skeletal Biopolymers and Proteins 2)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

26 pages, 6561 KiB  
Review
Dinoflagellate Amphiesmal Dynamics: Cell Wall Deposition with Ecdysis and Cellular Growth
by Alvin Chun Man Kwok, Wai Sun Chan and Joseph Tin Yum Wong
Mar. Drugs 2023, 21(2), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/md21020070 - 20 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2524
Abstract
Dinoflagellates are a major aquatic protist group with amphiesma, multiple cortical membranous “cell wall” layers that contain large circum-cortical alveolar sacs (AVs). AVs undergo extensive remodeling during cell- and life-cycle transitions, including ecdysal cysts (ECs) and resting cysts that are important in some [...] Read more.
Dinoflagellates are a major aquatic protist group with amphiesma, multiple cortical membranous “cell wall” layers that contain large circum-cortical alveolar sacs (AVs). AVs undergo extensive remodeling during cell- and life-cycle transitions, including ecdysal cysts (ECs) and resting cysts that are important in some harmful algal bloom initiation–termination. AVs are large cortical vesicular compartments, within which are elaborate cellulosic thecal plates (CTPs), in thecate species, and the pellicular layer (PL). AV-CTPs provide cellular mechanical protection and are targets of vesicular transport that are replaced during EC-swarmer cell transition, or with increased deposition during the cellular growth cycle. AV-PL exhibits dynamical-replacement with vesicular trafficking that are orchestrated with amphiesmal chlortetracycline-labeled Ca2+ stores signaling, integrating cellular growth with different modes of cell division cycle/progression. We reviewed the dynamics of amphiesma during different cell division cycle modes and life cycle stages, and its multifaceted regulations, focusing on the regulatory and functional readouts, including the coral–zooxanthellae interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Skeletal Biopolymers and Proteins 2)
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 3185 KiB  
Review
Marine Collagen: A Promising Biomaterial for Wound Healing, Skin Anti-Aging, and Bone Regeneration
by Sarah Geahchan, Parnian Baharlouei and Azizur Rahman
Mar. Drugs 2022, 20(1), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/md20010061 - 10 Jan 2022
Cited by 70 | Viewed by 13024
Abstract
Marine organisms harbor numerous bioactive substances that can be utilized in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Scientific research on various applications of collagen extracted from these organisms has become increasingly prevalent. Marine collagen can be used as a biomaterial because it is water [...] Read more.
Marine organisms harbor numerous bioactive substances that can be utilized in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Scientific research on various applications of collagen extracted from these organisms has become increasingly prevalent. Marine collagen can be used as a biomaterial because it is water soluble, metabolically compatible, and highly accessible. Upon review of the literature, it is evident that marine collagen is a versatile compound capable of healing skin injuries of varying severity, as well as delaying the natural human aging process. From in vitro to in vivo experiments, collagen has demonstrated its ability to invoke keratinocyte and fibroblast migration as well as vascularization of the skin. Additionally, marine collagen and derivatives have proven beneficial and useful for both osteoporosis and osteoarthritis prevention and treatment. Other bone-related diseases may also be targeted by collagen, as it is capable of increasing bone mineral density, mineral deposition, and importantly, osteoblast maturation and proliferation. In this review, we demonstrate the advantages of marine collagen over land animal sources and the biomedical applications of marine collagen related to bone and skin damage. Finally, some limitations of marine collagen are briefly discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Skeletal Biopolymers and Proteins 2)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

10 pages, 1306 KiB  
Review
A Unique Marine-Derived Collagen: Its Characterization towards Biocompatibility Applications for Tissue Regeneration
by Dafna Benayahu and Yehuda Benayahu
Mar. Drugs 2021, 19(8), 419; https://doi.org/10.3390/md19080419 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2098
Abstract
Biomedical engineering combines engineering and materials methods to restore, maintain, improve, or replace different types of biological tissues. In tissue engineering, following major injury, a scaffold is designed to support the local growth of cells, enabling the development of new viable tissue. To [...] Read more.
Biomedical engineering combines engineering and materials methods to restore, maintain, improve, or replace different types of biological tissues. In tissue engineering, following major injury, a scaffold is designed to support the local growth of cells, enabling the development of new viable tissue. To provide the conditions for the mechanical and structural properties needed for the restored tissue and its appropriate functioning, the scaffold requires specific biochemical properties in order to ensure a correct healing process. The scaffold creates a support system and requires a suitable material that will transduce the appropriate signals for the regenerative process to take place. A scaffold composed of material that mimics natural tissue, rather than a synthetic material, will achieve better results. Here, we provide an overview of natural components of marine-derived origin, the collagen fibers characterization schematic is summarized in the graphical abstract. The use of collagen fibers for biomedical applications and their performances in cell support are demonstrated in an in vitro system and in tissue regeneration in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Skeletal Biopolymers and Proteins 2)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop