Frontiers of Dermatological Research

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 31020

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology and Dermatological Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, 91-347 Lodz, Poland
Interests: autoinflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases; photobiology and phototherapy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Pediatric Dermatology and Dermatological Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, 92-215 Lodz, Poland
Interests: atopic dermatitis; photosensitivity; allergy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, University of Rzeszow, ul. Fryderyka Szopena 2, 35-055 Rzeszow, Poland
Interests: conecctive tissue diseases; lupus; pruritus

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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Paediatric Dermatology and Oncology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
Interests: atopic dermatitis; urticaria; non-melanoma skin cancers; photocancerogenesis; psoriasis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Autoimmune and autoinflammatory skin diseases are currently the subject of significant research in laboratory and clinical settings with new developments presented by scientists every single day. Despite incredible advances in our understanding of autoimmunity and inflammation, many questions remain unanswered. In this Special Issue, entitled “Frontiers of Dermatological Research”, we would like to present a collection of articles on the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical observations, and treatment of inflammation under different dermatological conditions. We invite submissions on genetic backgrounds, the role of the inflammasome, biological treatments and their complications, clinical investigations, and treatments using inflammation as their mechanism of action. This Special Issue will present different aspects of this fascinating process, from the basic science to the clinic, to provide readers with an overview of the state of the art in this topic.

Prof. Dr. Joanna Narbutt
Dr. Malgorzata Skibinska
Prof. Dr. Adam Reich
Prof. Dr. Aleksandra Lesiak
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • autoimmunity
  • inflammation
  • inflammasome
  • atopic dermatitis
  • biological products
  • pyoderma gangraenosum
  • photodynamic therapy
  • connective tissue diseases
  • UVB

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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8 pages, 683 KiB  
Article
Switching from Adalimumab Originator to Biosimilar in Patients with Hidradenitis Suppurativa Results in Losses of Response—Data from the German HS Registry HSBest
by Natalia Kirsten, Frenz Ohm, Kathrin Gehrdau, Gefion Girbig, Brigitte Stephan, Nesrine Ben-Anaya, Andreas Pinter, Falk G. Bechara, Dagmar Presser, Christos C. Zouboulis and Matthias Augustin
Life 2022, 12(10), 1518; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12101518 - 29 Sep 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2099
Abstract
Since 2021, adalimumab biosimilar ABP 501 can be used alternatively to adalimumab originator (ADAO) in the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Effectiveness and safety data remain scarce. We investigated the impact of switching from ADAO to ABP 501 on disease severity and the [...] Read more.
Since 2021, adalimumab biosimilar ABP 501 can be used alternatively to adalimumab originator (ADAO) in the treatment of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Effectiveness and safety data remain scarce. We investigated the impact of switching from ADAO to ABP 501 on disease severity and the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) in patients with HS. We analyzed clinical data on patients enrolled in the German HSBest registry. Evaluation outcomes were assessed at three time points (baseline of originator (t0), prior to switching to biosimilar (t1) and 12 to 14 weeks after switching (t2)) and included patient-reported AEs and disease severity using the International Hidradenitis Suppurativa Severity Score System (IHS4) score. In total, 94 patients were switched from ADAO to ABP 501. Overall, 33.3% (n = 31/94) of the patients developed AEs and/or loss of response (LoR) within 12 to 14 weeks after switching. Of these, 61.3% (n = 19/31) experienced LoR but no AEs, 22.6% (n = 7/31) LoR combined with AEs and 16.1% (n = 5/31) AEs only. Our study showed that switching HS patients from ADAO to ABP 501 does significantly affect treatment effectiveness. Switching patients who are on remission maintenance therapy should be viewed critically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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12 pages, 2489 KiB  
Communication
Report of a Novel ALOX12B Mutation in Self-Improving Collodion Ichthyosis with an Overview of the Genetic Background of the Collodion Baby Phenotype
by Pálma Anker, Norbert Kiss, István Kocsis, Éva Czemmel, Krisztina Becker, Sára Zakariás, Dóra Plázár, Klára Farkas, Balázs Mayer, Nikoletta Nagy, Márta Széll, Nándor Ács, Zsuzsanna Szalai and Márta Medvecz
Life 2021, 11(7), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070624 - 27 Jun 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2594
Abstract
Collodion baby is a congenital, transient phenotype encountered in approximately 70–90% of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis and is an important entity of neonatal erythroderma. The clinical outcome after this severe condition is variable. Genetic mutations of components of the epidermal lipoxygenase pathway have [...] Read more.
Collodion baby is a congenital, transient phenotype encountered in approximately 70–90% of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis and is an important entity of neonatal erythroderma. The clinical outcome after this severe condition is variable. Genetic mutations of components of the epidermal lipoxygenase pathway have been implicated in the majority of self-improving collodion ichthyosis (SICI). In SICI, the shedding of the collodion membrane reveals clear skin or only mild residual manifestation of ichthyosis. Here we report the case of a girl born with a severe form of collodion baby phenotype, whose skin almost completely cleared within the first month of life. At the age of 3 years, only mild symptoms of a keratinization disorder remained. However, the severity of erythema and scaling showed mild fluctuations over time. To objectively evaluate the skin changes of the patient, we assessed the ichthyosis severity index. Upon sequencing of the ALOX12B gene, we identified a previously unreported heterozygous nonsense mutation, c.1607G>A (p.Trp536Ter) with the recurrent, heterozygous mutation c.1562A>G (p.Tyr521Cys). Thereby, our findings expand the genotypic spectrum of SICI. In addition, we summarize the spectrum of further genetic diseases that can present at birth as collodion baby, in particular the SICI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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11 pages, 4931 KiB  
Article
The Optimal Application of Medium Potency Topical Corticosteroids in Preventing Laser-Induced Inflammatory Responses—An Animal Study
by Kuang-Ling Ou, Chia-Cheng Wen, Ching-Ya Lan, Yu-An Chen, Chih-Hsin Wang and Yi-Wen Wang
Life 2021, 11(4), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11040350 - 17 Apr 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3295
Abstract
Background: During ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) laser therapy, thermal damage to the skin is inevitable, resulting in inflammatory responses and small wounds. Corticosteroids are known for their anti-inflammatory effect. However, inappropriate application of corticosteroids carries the risk of delayed wound healing. Therefore, we [...] Read more.
Background: During ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) laser therapy, thermal damage to the skin is inevitable, resulting in inflammatory responses and small wounds. Corticosteroids are known for their anti-inflammatory effect. However, inappropriate application of corticosteroids carries the risk of delayed wound healing. Therefore, we aimed to find the optimal administration route, timing, and duration of medium potency corticosteroid treatment to prevent AFR laser-induced inflammatory responses and to minimize the risk of delayed wound healing. Methods: We determined the anti-inflammatory efficacy of corticosteroids by skin erythema and tissue biopsies on C57BL/6 mice. Wound healing was evaluated by crust area and epithelial gap. Finally, Masson’s trichrome stain and α-SMA immunohistochemistry stain were used to analyze scar contracture. Results: Our results demonstrated that one dose of medium-potency topical corticosteroid applied immediately after AFR laser treatment could prevent erythema effectively with minimal disruption to wound healing. Notably, when more than one dose was administered, wound healing was delayed and scar contracture was aggravated by the application of medium-potency topical corticosteroids in a dosage-dependent manner. Conclusion: Our findings suggested that single-dose medium-potency topical corticosteroids could potentially improve AFR laser-induced acute inflammatory responses in clinical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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10 pages, 3152 KiB  
Communication
Association between Vascular Inflammation and Inflammation in Adipose Tissue, Spleen, and Bone Marrow in Patients with Psoriasis
by Hannah Kaiser, Amanda Kvist-Hansen, Martin Krakauer, Peter Michael Gørtz, Kristoffer Mads Aaris Henningsen, Xing Wang, Christine Becker, Claus Zachariae, Lone Skov and Peter Riis Hansen
Life 2021, 11(4), 305; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11040305 - 1 Apr 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2375
Abstract
Psoriasis is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) with significant overlap of inflammatory pathways. A link between vascular inflammation and inflammation in multiple adipose tissue types, spleen, and bone marrow may exist. Therefore, we investigated these associations using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed [...] Read more.
Psoriasis is associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) with significant overlap of inflammatory pathways. A link between vascular inflammation and inflammation in multiple adipose tissue types, spleen, and bone marrow may exist. Therefore, we investigated these associations using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG-PET/CT) in patients with psoriasis (n = 83) where half had established CVD. Carotid ultrasound imaging was also performed. Inflammation was measured by FDG uptake in the aorta, visceral- (VAT), subcutaneous- (SAT), and pericardial (PAT) adipose tissues, and spleen and bone marrow, respectively. Vascular inflammation was associated with FDG uptakes in all adipose tissues, including VAT (β = 0.26; p < 0.001), SAT (β = 0.28; p < 0.001), PAT (β = 0.24; p < 0.001), spleen (β = 1.35; p = 0.001), and bone marrow (β = 1.14; p < 0.001). Adjustments for age, sex, body mass index, and high sensitivity C-reactive protein did not change the results. These associations were generally preserved in the patients without prior CVD. No associations were observed between vascular inflammation and carotid intima-media thickness or presence of carotid plaques, respectively. The results suggest an inflammatory link between vascular and adipose tissues, spleen, and bone marrow in patients with psoriasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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8 pages, 893 KiB  
Article
Correlation of the ALA-PDT Treatment Efficacy and the HPV Genotype Profile of Genital Warts after Cryotherapy Failure and Podophyllotoxin Therapy in Male Patients
by Witold Owczarek, Monika Slowinska, Irena Walecka, Magdalena Ciazynska, Dorota Nowicka, Leszek Walczak and Elwira Paluchowska
Life 2021, 11(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11020146 - 14 Feb 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 6499
Abstract
Background: Genital warts are the manifestation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which may last for weeks or months before the clinical presentation. The primary aim of the study was the correlation of the DNA HPV genotypes eradication with the treatment response in [...] Read more.
Background: Genital warts are the manifestation of the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, which may last for weeks or months before the clinical presentation. The primary aim of the study was the correlation of the DNA HPV genotypes eradication with the treatment response in male patients with persistent genital warts. Methods: Twenty-one male patients (age range: 22–58) after failure of cryotherapy and podophyllotoxin treatment were enrolled in the study. Genetic tests (Real Time - PCR method) analyzed the presence of DNA-HPV before and 6 months after four sessions (4 weeks apart) of photodynamic therapy with 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA-PDT). The treatment efficacy was evaluated before each PDT session and at the end of the study. Results: The single HPV DNA type was present in 15/21 of the patients (13/15 HPV6). The high-risk HPV types were found in 8/21 subjects, of which 6/8 had several types. Six months after four sessions of PDT, complete response was found in 16/21 (76.19%; p = 0.0007) of patients, and DNA HPV clearance was found in 66.67% (p = 0.03). The eradication rate differed among patients with primary low-risk and high-risk HPV types—76.92% (10/13; p = 0.0003) and 50% (4/8; p = 0.05) respectively. Conclusion: ALA-PDT is an effective treatment even after the failure of previous modalities. The persistence of clinical lesions and high oncological risk HPV types should be an indication for treatment prolongation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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Review

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13 pages, 1608 KiB  
Review
Body Mass Index Influence for the Personalization of the Monoclonal Antibodies Therapy for Psoriasis
by Flavia Anghel, Diana Nitusca and Patricia Cristodor
Life 2021, 11(12), 1316; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11121316 - 29 Nov 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2295
Abstract
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, autoimmune-mediated disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Advances in treatment with biological agents represented by monoclonal antibodies, such as TNF-α inhibitors (TNFI), IL-17A and IL-12/23 antagonists have not only benefited from outstanding clinical efficacy with lower side [...] Read more.
Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory, autoimmune-mediated disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Advances in treatment with biological agents represented by monoclonal antibodies, such as TNF-α inhibitors (TNFI), IL-17A and IL-12/23 antagonists have not only benefited from outstanding clinical efficacy with lower side effects compared to conventional systemic therapy, but also raised the standards towards therapeutic success, fact reflected in the greater Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) response rates. However, due to their relatively recent introduction in clinical practice, and despite their proven superior efficacy, further research is needed for monitoring the eventual changes in treatment-induced parameters, especially of metabolic origin. In this respect, initial reports stress on one particular comorbidity associated with psoriasis-obesity-which seems to be not only a risk and result of the disease, but also an adverse effect of long-term therapy with some biologics. The consequent drug-induced increase in body mass index (BMI) of patients suffering from psoriasis undergoing biological treatment appears to contribute to the progression of the disease, promote drug discontinuation and reduce overall clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibodies. Therefore, we review herein the impact of body weight (BMI) increase on the biological treatment of psoriasis, to further investigate on its relationship with the disease and aid on the management of treatment schemes that take into account individual characteristics of patients, such as body mass, for a more efficient and personalized therapy approach. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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13 pages, 2513 KiB  
Review
Blue Light in Dermatology
by Magdalena Sadowska, Joanna Narbutt and Aleksandra Lesiak
Life 2021, 11(7), 670; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070670 - 8 Jul 2021
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 5854
Abstract
Phototherapy is an important method of dermatological treatments. Ultraviolet (280–400 nm) therapy is of great importance; however, there are concerns of its long-term use, as it can lead to skin aging and carcinogenesis. This review aims to evaluate the role and the mechanism [...] Read more.
Phototherapy is an important method of dermatological treatments. Ultraviolet (280–400 nm) therapy is of great importance; however, there are concerns of its long-term use, as it can lead to skin aging and carcinogenesis. This review aims to evaluate the role and the mechanism of action of blue light (400–500 nm), a UV-free method. The main mediators of cellular responses to blue light are nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the detailed mechanism is still not fully understood. It was demonstrated that blue light induces an anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative effect; thus, it may be beneficial for hyperproliferative and chronic inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis. It was also found that blue light might cause the reduction of itching. It may be beneficial on hair growth and may be used in the treatment of acne vulgaris by reducing follicular colonization of Propionibacterium acnes. Further studies are needed to develop accurate protocols, as the clinical effects depend on the light parameters as well as the treatment length. There are no major adverse effects observed yet, but long-term safety should be monitored as there are no studies considering the long-term effects of blue light on the skin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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14 pages, 1885 KiB  
Review
Ultraviolet Radiation and Chronic Inflammation—Molecules and Mechanisms Involved in Skin Carcinogenesis: A Narrative Review
by Magdalena Ciążyńska, Irmina Olejniczak-Staruch, Dorota Sobolewska-Sztychny, Joanna Narbutt, Małgorzata Skibińska and Aleksandra Lesiak
Life 2021, 11(4), 326; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11040326 - 8 Apr 2021
Cited by 36 | Viewed by 4076
Abstract
The process of skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence indicate that chronic inflammation is one of the hallmarks of microenvironmental-agent-mediated skin cancers and contributes to its development. Maintaining an inflammatory microenvironment is a condition leading to tumor [...] Read more.
The process of skin carcinogenesis is still not fully understood. Both experimental and epidemiological evidence indicate that chronic inflammation is one of the hallmarks of microenvironmental-agent-mediated skin cancers and contributes to its development. Maintaining an inflammatory microenvironment is a condition leading to tumor formation. Multiple studies focus on the molecular pathways activating tumorigenesis by inflammation and indicate several biomarkers and factors that can improve diagnostic and prognostic processes in oncology and dermatology. Reactive oxygen species produced by ultraviolet radiation, oxidizers, or metabolic processes can damage cells and initiate pro-inflammatory cascades. Considering the potential role of inflammation in cancer development and metastasis, the identification of early mechanisms involved in carcinogenesis is crucial for clinical practice and scientific research. Moreover, it could lead to the progress of advanced skin cancer therapies. We focus on a comprehensive analysis of available evidence and on understanding how chronic inflammation and ultraviolet radiation can result in skin carcinogenesis. We present the inflammatory environment as complex molecular networks triggering tumorigenesis and constituting therapeutic targets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Frontiers of Dermatological Research)
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