Abiotic Stress Signaling and Responses in Plants: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 February 2024) | Viewed by 954

Special Issue Editors

College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China
Interests: nutrient; abiotic stress; aluminum toxicity; iron deficiency; root development; receptor like kinase
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China
Interests: cold stress; heat stress; thermomorphogenesis; post-translational modifications; signal transduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to contribute your research to this second volume of this Special Issue, entitled “Abiotic Stress Signaling and Responses in Plants” https://www.mdpi.com/journal/life/special_issues/__Abiotic, which follows on from the success of the first edition.

The global population is predicted to reach 10 billion by the end of year 2050, and the food crisis is predicted to become a substantially critical issue worldwide. As the major source of food, plants live in constantly changing environments and face a series of abiotic stresses that are detrimental to plant growth and crop productivity. These abiotic stresses include drought, high salinity, cold and hot conditions, nutrient starvation and toxic metals. To cope with these stresses, plants have evolved particular strategies to respond and adapt to a certain stress. Yet, our understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying plant abiotic stress responses remains limited, hence restricting molecular breeding towards improving stress tolerance.

This Special Issue of Life, entitled “Abiotic Stress Signaling and Responses in Plants”, aims to focus on the latest research progress regarding the molecular bases of plants responding to different abiotic stresses and the relevant signaling pathways, as well as explore advanced techniques that help to enhance breeding and research that is concerned with abiotic stress. The scope of this Special Issue covers a wide range of topics on abiotic stresses, from model plants to specific crops. Authors are welcome to submit both articles and review papers.

Dr. Zhongjie Ding
Dr. Yanglin Ding
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • drought
  • salt stress
  • cold
  • hot
  • nutrient starvation
  • toxic metal
  • signaling

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 2488 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Seed Germination of Six Rare Stipa Species following Low Temperature Stress (Cryopreservation)
Life 2023, 13(12), 2296; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122296 - 02 Dec 2023
Viewed by 712
Abstract
Cryopreservation is one way to preserve rare, endangered species. However, during the cryopreservation process, plant cells undergo considerable stress, which may lead to cell death. In our work, orthodox Stipa seeds of six rare species were cryopreserved: S. sareptana, S. ucrainica, [...] Read more.
Cryopreservation is one way to preserve rare, endangered species. However, during the cryopreservation process, plant cells undergo considerable stress, which may lead to cell death. In our work, orthodox Stipa seeds of six rare species were cryopreserved: S. sareptana, S. ucrainica, S. tirsa, S. dasyphylla, S. adoxa, and S. pulcherríma. Short-term cryopreservation (14 days) stimulated germination of all Stipa species studied. Prolonged cryopreservation (70 days and more) decreased the germination of all Stipa seeds except S. sareptana. The decrease in germination progressed over time as a result of the cumulative stress of cryopreservation rather than the initial stress. To stimulate germination, seeds were stratified and treated with GA3, KNO3, NaOH, and H2O2. After four years of seed cryopreservation, it was possible to obtain seedlings of all the Stipa species studied with 30 days of stratification and 180 days of germination. After five years of cryopreservation and seed treatment with 30% NaOH for one hour, the best germination was obtained in S. adoxa and S. pulcherrima. After treatment with 5% H2O2 for 20 min, the best germination was obtained in S. sareptana, S. ucrainica, and S. dasyphylla. S. sareptana seeds germinated in all the aforementioned experiments. S. sareptana has a non-deep physiological dormancy and is the most widespread and drought-tolerant Stipa species studied. The best habitat adaptation and stress tolerance correlated with this species’cryotolerance. S. sareptana was recommended for further cryopreservation, while storage protocols for the other Stipa species studied need further improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress Signaling and Responses in Plants: 2nd Edition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop