Gender Medicine: Are Gender Differences Important for Medicine?

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2542

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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medicine can be prescribed based on gender to account for differences in epidemiology, symptomatology, and treatment for different diseases. In this regard, for example, the literature on the COVID-19 pandemic described that older men with comorbidities had higher mortality rates than female subjects. Furthermore, aside from age and comorbidities, sex and gender differences were found to influence the management of diseases. The objective of this Special Issue is to contribute to the literature on the study of gender/sex differences in pathology and management for diseases.

Dr. Tiziana Ciarambino
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • gender/sex differences
  • heart, brain, and renal diseases

Published Papers (2 papers)

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15 pages, 1068 KiB  
Review
Are Gender Differences Important for Autoimmune Liver Diseases?
by Annarosa Floreani, Daniela Gabbia and Sara De Martin
Life 2024, 14(4), 500; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14040500 - 12 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Gender Medicine has had an enormous expansion over the last ten years. Autoimmune liver diseases include several conditions, i.e., autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and conditions involving the liver or biliary tree overlapping with AIH, as well [...] Read more.
Gender Medicine has had an enormous expansion over the last ten years. Autoimmune liver diseases include several conditions, i.e., autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), and conditions involving the liver or biliary tree overlapping with AIH, as well as IgG4-related disease. However, little is known about the impact of sex in the pathogenesis and natural history of these conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide an update of the gender disparities among the autoimmune liver diseases by reviewing the data published from 1999 to 2023. The epidemiology of these diseases has been changing over the last years, due to the amelioration of knowledge in their diagnosis, pathogenesis, and treatment. The clinical data collected so far support the existence of sex differences in the natural history of autoimmune liver diseases. Notably, their history could be longer than that which is now known, with problems being initiated even at a pediatric age. Moreover, gender disparity has been observed during the onset of complications related to end-stage liver disease, including cancer incidence. However, there is still an important debate among researchers about the impact of sex and the pathogenesis of these conditions. With this review, we would like to emphasize the urgency of basic science and clinical research to increase our understanding of the sex differences in autoimmune liver diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Medicine: Are Gender Differences Important for Medicine?)
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9 pages, 586 KiB  
Systematic Review
Hyperacusis: Focus on Gender Differences: A Systematic Review
by Lucia Belen Musumano, Stavros Hatzopoulos, Virginia Fancello, Chiara Bianchini, Tiziana Bellini, Stefano Pelucchi, Piotr Henryk Skarżyński, Magdalena B. Skarżyńska and Andrea Ciorba
Life 2023, 13(10), 2092; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102092 - 21 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Background: While gender differences of several diseases have been already described in the literature, studies in the area of hyperacusis are still scant. Despite the fact that hyperacusis is a condition that severely affects the patient’s quality of life, it is not well [...] Read more.
Background: While gender differences of several diseases have been already described in the literature, studies in the area of hyperacusis are still scant. Despite the fact that hyperacusis is a condition that severely affects the patient’s quality of life, it is not well investigated; a comprehensive understanding of its features, eventually including gender differences, could be a valuable asset in developing clinical intervention strategies. Aim: To evaluate gender differences among subjects affected by hyperacusis. Methods: A literature search was conducted focused on adult patients presenting hyperacusis, using the MedLine bibliographic database. Relevant peer-reviewed studies, published in the last 20 years, were sought. A total of 259 papers have been identified, but only 4 met the inclusion criteria. The review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Results: The four selected papers included data from 604 patients; of these, 282 subjects resulted as affected by hyperacusis (125 females and 157 males). Questionnaires for analyzing factors affecting the attentional, social and emotional variance of hyperacusis (such as VAS, THI, TSCH, MASH) were administered to all included subjects. The data suggest that there are no hyperacusis gender-specific differences in the assessed population samples. Conclusions: The literature data suggest that males and females exhibit a similar level of hyperacusis. However, in light of the subjective nature of this condition, the eventual set up of further tests to assess hyperacusis features could be very helpful in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gender Medicine: Are Gender Differences Important for Medicine?)
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