Assessments of Bioactive and Toxic Substances in Cellular and Animal Models

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Tissue Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 1587

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail
Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra, Slovakia
Interests: animal physiology; biochemistry; hematology; bioactive substances; trace elements; oxidative stress; ecotoxicology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Applied Biology, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Tr. A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra, Slovakia
Interests: cell biology; reproductive toxicology; steroidogenesis; xenobiotics; natural compounds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the increasing number of anthropogenic xenobiotics entering the environment, and considering the sophisticated systems developed by the body for the distribution, metabolism and elimination of xenobiotics that enter the body in various ways, the discipline of toxicology has been a very current and urgent issue in recent decades. As most of them can interact with cell surfaces or nuclear receptors, they can cause non-physiological alterations in cellular homeostasis even at low concentrations, which places them in a special category of toxic substances in terms of health risks. On the other hand, natural plant extracts have several biological effects (immunological, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer). In addition to their positive biological effects, the side effects that appear in conventional treatments are absent. The assessment of risk elements, xenobiotics, nanoparticles, and biologically active substances in animal cells and/or tissues, the study of ecotoxicological interactions and their effects on animal health indicators in natural and model conditions is currently a relevant topic.

Dr. Anton Kovacik
Dr. Tomáš Jambor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cell biology
  • animal physiology
  • natural compounds
  • xenobiotics
  • trace elements
  • reproductive toxicology
  • oxidative status markers
  • health status
  • ecotoxicology

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 6132 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Phenol on the Growth, Morphology and Cell Division of Euglena gracilis
by Alexandra Lukáčová, Diana Lihanová, Terézia Beck, Roman Alberty, Dominika Vešelényiová, Juraj Krajčovič and Matej Vesteg
Life 2023, 13(8), 1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13081734 - 12 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1204
Abstract
Phenol, a monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major pollutant in industrial wastewater. Euglena gracilis is a unicellular freshwater flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. This protist has been widely used for monitoring the biological effect of various [...] Read more.
Phenol, a monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbon with various commercial uses, is a major pollutant in industrial wastewater. Euglena gracilis is a unicellular freshwater flagellate possessing secondary chloroplasts of green algal origin. This protist has been widely used for monitoring the biological effect of various inorganic and organic environmental pollutants, including aromatic hydrocarbons. In this study, we evaluate the influence of different phenol concentrations (3.39 mM, 3.81 mM, 4.23 mM, 4.65 mM, 5.07 mM, 5.49 mM and 5.91 mM) on the growth, morphology and cell division of E. gracilis. The cell count continually decreases (p < 0.05–0.001) over time with increasing phenol concentration. While phenol treatment does not induce bleaching (permanent loss of photosynthesis), the morphological changes caused by phenol include the formation of spherical (p < 0.01–0.001), hypertrophied (p < 0.05) and monster cells (p < 0.01) and lipofuscin bodies. Phenol also induces an atypical form of cell division of E. gracilis, simultaneously producing more than 2 (3–12) viable cells from a single cell. Such atypically dividing cells have a symmetric “star”-like shape. The percentage of atypically dividing cells increases (p < 0.05) with increasing phenol concentration. Our findings suggest that E. gracilis can be used as bioindicator of phenol contamination in freshwater habitats and wastewater. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop