Optical Imaging and Fluorescence Imaging in Breast Cancer Diagnosis and Surgery

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 May 2024 | Viewed by 4071

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Gustave Roussy, Plate-forme Imagerie et Cytométrie, UMS AMMICA (US 23 UAR 3655), Université Paris-Saclay, 94805 Villejuif, France
Interests: fluorescence; optical imaging; cancer; surgery; pathology; indocyanine green

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Guest Editor
Department of Breast and Plastic Surgery, Gustave Roussy, Université Paris‐Saclay, 114 rue Edouard Vaillant 94800 Villejuif, France
Interests: breast cancer; surgery; oncoplastic; fluorescence; free margins; non-wire guided localization systems; lymph nodes

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Guest Editor
Central Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Interests: optical imaging; fluorescence imaging; breast cancer surgery; breast cancer diagnosis; breast reconstructive surgery; microscopy; breast tumor; lymph node; fluorophore

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The most prevalent cancer in the world is breast cancer, with 285 000 new cases in the US each year (SEER database). In fact, 12.4% of women in the world have breast cancer. Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved since the early 21st century to a personalized approach that takes into consideration tumor burden and dynamic functional anatomy.

Optical methods based on light–tissue interactions are now described for clinical use in breast cancer and the miniaturization of optical components has boosted the emergence of new optical approaches for clinical implementation, such as confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography or photoacoustic imaging. The potential of fluorescence-guided surgery has also been reported in promising studies over the last decade. The main example is the increasing clinical adoption of indocyanine green for near infrared fluorescence sentinel lymph node identification before breast cancer surgery.

Contributions are invited for this Special Issue from researchers working on fluorescence and optical imaging approaches for breast cancer diagnosis, surgery and reconstructive surgery. Both original articles and reviews are welcome. Topics include but are not limited to NIR fluorescence imaging, OCT, photoacoustic imaging, ex vivo confocal microscopy, specific fluorescence, SWIR, functional imaging, morphological imaging in ex vivo and in vivo breast cancer applications for clinical translation.

Dr. Muriel Abbaci
Dr. Angelica Conversano
Dr. Sanjay Warrier
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • optical imaging
  • fluorescence imaging
  • breast cancer surgery
  • breast cancer diagnosis
  • breast reconstructive surgery
  • microscopy
  • breast tumor
  • lymph node
  • fluorophore

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 2303 KiB  
Article
The Fusion of Wide Field Optical Coherence Tomography and AI: Advancing Breast Cancer Surgical Margin Visualization
by Yanir Levy, David Rempel, Mark Nguyen, Ali Yassine, Maggie Sanati-Burns, Payal Salgia, Bryant Lim, Sarah L. Butler, Andrew Berkeley and Ersin Bayram
Life 2023, 13(12), 2340; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122340 - 14 Dec 2023
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Abstract
This study explores the integration of Wide Field Optical Coherence Tomography (WF-OCT) with an AI-driven clinical decision support system, with the goal of enhancing productivity and decision making in breast cancer surgery margin assessment. A computationally efficient convolutional neural network (CNN)-based binary classifier [...] Read more.
This study explores the integration of Wide Field Optical Coherence Tomography (WF-OCT) with an AI-driven clinical decision support system, with the goal of enhancing productivity and decision making in breast cancer surgery margin assessment. A computationally efficient convolutional neural network (CNN)-based binary classifier is developed using 585 WF-OCT margin scans from 151 subjects. The CNN model swiftly identifies suspicious areas within margins with an on-device inference time of approximately 10 ms for a 420 × 2400 image. In independent testing on 155 pathology-confirmed margins, including 31 positive margins from 29 patients, the classifier achieved an AUROC of 0.976, a sensitivity of 0.93, and a specificity of 0.98. At the margin level, the deep learning model accurately identified 96.8% of pathology-positive margins. These results highlight the clinical viability of AI-enhanced margin visualization using WF-OCT in breast cancer surgery and its potential to decrease reoperation rates due to residual tumors. Full article
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Review

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12 pages, 1163 KiB  
Review
Evolution of Indocyanine Green Fluorescence in Breast and Axilla Surgery: An Australasian Experience
by Chu Luan Nguyen, Nirmal Dayaratna, Susannah Graham, Farhad Azimi, Cindy Mak, Carlo Pulitano and Sanjay Warrier
Life 2024, 14(1), 135; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14010135 - 17 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The evolution of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence in breast and axilla surgery from an Australasian perspective is discussed in this narrative review with a focus on breast cancer and reconstruction surgery. The authors have nearly a decade of experience with ICG in a [...] Read more.
The evolution of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence in breast and axilla surgery from an Australasian perspective is discussed in this narrative review with a focus on breast cancer and reconstruction surgery. The authors have nearly a decade of experience with ICG in a high-volume institution, which has resulted in publications and ongoing future research evaluating its use for predicting mastectomy skin flap perfusion for reconstruction, lymphatic mapping for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, and axillary reverse mapping (ARM) for prevention of lymphoedema. In the authors’ experience, routine use of ICG angiography during breast reconstruction postmastectomy was demonstrated to be cost-effective for the reduction of ischemic complications in the Australian setting. A novel tracer combination, ICG–technetium-99m offered a safe and effective substitute to the “gold standard” dual tracer for SLN biopsy, although greater costs were associated with ICG. An ongoing trial will evaluate ARM node identification using ICG fluorescence during axillary lymph node dissection and potential predictive factors of ARM node involvement. These data add to the growing literature on ICG and allow future research to build on this to improve understanding of the potential benefits of fluorescence-guided surgery in breast cancer and reconstruction surgery. Full article
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Other

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14 pages, 3738 KiB  
Project Report
SENOSI Confocal Microscopy: A New and Innovating Way to Detect Positive Margins in Non-Palpable Breast Cancer?
by Deborah Wernly, Charles Beniere, Valerie Besse, Stephanie Seidler, Regine Lachat, Igor Letovanec, Daniela Huber and Colin Simonson
Life 2024, 14(2), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14020204 - 31 Jan 2024
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Abstract
In Switzerland, breast cancer is the leading cancer among women, with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) being the preferred treatment for small tumors. The margin status post-surgery is a critical predictor of local recurrence. Achieving negative margins remains a challenge, leading to re-excision in 20–30% [...] Read more.
In Switzerland, breast cancer is the leading cancer among women, with breast-conserving surgery (BCS) being the preferred treatment for small tumors. The margin status post-surgery is a critical predictor of local recurrence. Achieving negative margins remains a challenge, leading to re-excision in 20–30% of cases. Traditional methods like intraoperative examination palpation and radiography have limitations in assessing excised margins. This study introduces the Histolog® Scanner, a confocal microscopy tool, as a potential solution. It provides real-time images of tissue architecture, allowing for rapid and accurate assessment of excised margins. Our research compared the Histolog® Scanner with standard per-operative radiography in patients with non palpable breast cancer. Preliminary results indicate that the Histolog® Scanner offers a reliable and time-efficient method for margin assessment, suggesting its potential for clinical integration. Full article
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