Research Advances in Surgical Urology

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 June 2024 | Viewed by 3131

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: Surgical urology; endourology; uro-oncology; male sexual dysfunction; prostate cancer

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Taoyuan General Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
Interests: prostate cancer; surgical urology; androgen deprivation therapy; health data mining; precision medicine
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on the latest developments and advancements in the field of surgical urology. The issue covers a wide range of topics related to surgical urology, including surgical techniques, surgical oncology, robotic-assisted surgery, endourology, uro-oncology, innovative procedures, urolithiasis management, continence surgery, surgical outcomes, and patient care.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide urologists, surgeons, and researchers with a comprehensive overview of the recent advancements in surgical urology and their potential impact on clinical practice. The articles are written by leading experts in the field, and the issue is expected to be of great interest to anyone involved in the diagnosis and treatment of urological conditions.

Overall, this Special Issue is an important contribution to the field of surgical urology and will help to shape the future of urological research and practice.

Dr. Chih-Wei Tsao
Dr. Juiming Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surgical urology
  • endourology
  • surgical techniques
  • surgical oncology
  • prostate cancer
  • urothelial cancer
  • robotic-assisted surgery
  • benign prostate hyperplasia
  • continence surgery
  • urolithiasis management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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6 pages, 230 KiB  
Communication
Primary Ureteroscopy without Pre-Stenting for Proximal Ureteral Stones—Is It Feasible?
by Alon Lazarovich, Rennen Haramaty, Asaf Shvero, Dorit E. Zilberman, Zohar A. Dotan, Harry Winkler and Nir Kleimann
Life 2023, 13(10), 2019; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13102019 - 5 Oct 2023
Viewed by 662
Abstract
Background: Primary ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy is the treatment of choice for distal ureteral stones. However, in cases of proximal ureteral stones, some urologists recommend the preliminary insertion of a ureteral stent and deferred ureteroscopy. We aimed to evaluate the necessity of preliminary [...] Read more.
Background: Primary ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy is the treatment of choice for distal ureteral stones. However, in cases of proximal ureteral stones, some urologists recommend the preliminary insertion of a ureteral stent and deferred ureteroscopy. We aimed to evaluate the necessity of preliminary ureteral stent insertion in the management of proximal ureteral stones by comparing the surgical outcomes of patients undergoing primary ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy for proximal vs. distal ureteral stones. Methods: Medical records of patients who underwent ureteroscopy between 2016 and 2017 in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Data collected included demographic data, stone size, renal function, intra- and post-operative complications, and stone-free rate (SFR). Patients were divided into two groups: proximal ureteral stones and distal ureteral stones. Results: The cohort included 241 patients who underwent ureteroscopy. Among them, 106 had a proximal ureteral stone. The median age was 51 (IQR 41–65) years. Patients who underwent ureteroscopy for proximal ureteral stones were significantly older (p = 0.007). The median stone’s maximal diameter was 7 (5–10) mm. The complication rate and stone-free rate (SFR) were similar in both groups (p = 0.657 and p = 1, respectively). The prevalence of post-procedural ureteral stent insertion was higher among patients who underwent ureteroscopy for proximal ureteral stones: 92.5% vs. 79.3% (p = 0.004). Conclusions: Our study concludes that primary ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy for proximal ureteral stones is a valid and feasible treatment with a similar surgical outcome compared to distal ureteral stones. Preliminary ureteral stent insertion seems to be unnecessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Surgical Urology)
10 pages, 434 KiB  
Article
Is Surgical Treatment for Obesity Able to Cure Urinary Incontinence in Women?—A Prospective Single-Center Study
by Cristian Persu, Remus Nicolae Cartas, Irina Ciofu, Bogdan Mastalier and Victor Mihail Cauni
Life 2023, 13(9), 1897; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13091897 - 11 Sep 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 834
Abstract
There is enough evidence to support weight loss in order to improve urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, weight loss and maintaining a lower weight are not easy to achieve in the general population. Our study aims to evaluate whether bariatric surgery has a positive effect [...] Read more.
There is enough evidence to support weight loss in order to improve urinary incontinence. Nevertheless, weight loss and maintaining a lower weight are not easy to achieve in the general population. Our study aims to evaluate whether bariatric surgery has a positive effect on the symptoms of urinary incontinence in female patients. We performed a prospective study on obese female patients before and after bariatric surgery, over a period of 9 years. Patients with a BMI ≥ 33 kg/m2 were included if they described involuntary loss of urine and no previous surgery for urinary incontinence was performed. The patients underwent laparoscopic surgery, either gastric sleeve, bypass or banding, performed by four surgeons in our hospital. The type of incontinence was not assessed at the initial visit carried out by the surgeon. All patients who declared being incontinent were referred to the urologist where they received the ICIQ—UI-SF questionnaire before their bariatric surgery and during follow -up visits. The sum of points obtained at questions 3, 4 and 5 was used to evaluate the severity of incontinence, as well as the impact on the quality of life. Our evaluation collected data on age, time since onset of symptoms, pad usage, number and type of deliveries, concomitant conditions and medications. The type of incontinence was assessed by the urologist before bariatric surgery as urge, stress or mixed incontinence. At follow-up visits, the patients were also asked to fill out a 10-point VAS questionnaire evaluating their perception on the evolution of incontinence symptoms. Data were analyzed using t-test statistical analysis. Our objective defined changes in incontinence as cure, improved, no change and worse. We included 54 women from whom initial data and at least 18 months of follow-up were available. We observed that about 50% of all women undergoing bariatric surgery have some degree of urinary incontinence. The ICIQ score improved from 13.31 ± 5.18 before surgery to 8.30 ± 4.49 points after surgery (p < 0.0001). Before surgery, 38 patients (70%) described severe incontinence compared to only 20 patients (37%) after surgery. A total of 16 women (31%) reported complete cure of urinary incontinence after bariatric surgery. Data from the VAS questionnaire show improvement in 46 cases (85%). Pad usage improved from 7.04 ± 2.79 to 3.42 ± 2.77 (p < 0.001) per day. The number of patients using more than one pad per day decreased from 35 (65%) to 9 (17%). The type of incontinence did not seem to be relevant, but our sample size was too small to lead to statistically significant results. There was no impact on the outcome of incontinence of number/type of delivery, age or BMI. Our data show that bariatric surgery is able to cure urinary incontinence in one of three obese women. A significant improvement was obtained in more than two-thirds of the patients, regardless of the type of incontinence. For an obese female with urinary incontinence, treatment for obesity should prevail and incontinence should be treated only if symptoms remain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Surgical Urology)
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Review

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13 pages, 281 KiB  
Review
Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy in Urological Malignancies: Current Applications and Future Perspectives
by Luca Ongaro, Giulio Rossin, Arianna Biasatti, Matteo Pacini, Michele Rizzo, Fabio Traunero, Andrea Piasentin, Alessandro Perotti, Carlo Trombetta, Riccardo Bartoletti, Alessandro Zucchi, Alchiede Simonato, Nicola Pavan, Giovanni Liguori and Francesco Claps
Life 2023, 13(12), 2301; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122301 - 5 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1213
Abstract
Fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) represents a novel diagnostic technique able to provide real-time histological images from non-fixed specimens. As a consequence of its recent developments, FCM is gaining growing popularity in urological practice. Nevertheless, evidence is still sparse, and, at the moment, its [...] Read more.
Fluorescence confocal microscopy (FCM) represents a novel diagnostic technique able to provide real-time histological images from non-fixed specimens. As a consequence of its recent developments, FCM is gaining growing popularity in urological practice. Nevertheless, evidence is still sparse, and, at the moment, its applications are heterogeneous. We performed a narrative review of the current literature on this topic. Papers were selected from the Pubmed, Embase, and Medline archives. We focused on FCM applications in prostate cancer (PCa), urothelial carcinoma (UC), and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Articles investigating both office and intraoperative settings were included. The review of the literature showed that FCM displays promising accuracy as compared to conventional histopathology. These results represent significant steps along the path of FCM’s formal validation as an innovative ready-to-use diagnostic support in urological practice. Instant access to a reliable histological evaluation may indeed significantly influence physicians’ decision-making process. In this regard, FCM addresses this still unmet clinical need and introduces intriguing perspectives into future diagnostic pathways. Further studies are required to thoroughly assess the whole potential of this technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Surgical Urology)
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