Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 6587

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Digestive Tract Surgery, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Interests: gastrointestinal surgery; oncological surgery; vascular surgery; gastroenterology; angiology; oncology; nutritional status; nutrition
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Guest Editor
Department of Digestive Tract Surgery, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
Interests: pancreaticoduodenectomy; vascular resection; distal and total pancreatectomy; middle segment pancreatectomy; pancreaticojejunostomy; POPF; drainage operations in chronic pancreatitis
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Guest Editor
Euro-Mediterranean Institute of Science and Technology, Palermo, Italy
Interests: surgery; regenerative medicine; proctology; anal fistulas; anal fissures
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pancreatectomy, including pancreaticoduodenectomy, as well as central, distal and total/subtotal pancreatectomy, is a major complex and difficult surgical procedure performed for various benign and malignant pancreatic diseases: from chronic pancreatitis, through benign cystic tumors and neuroendocrine neoplasms to malignant adenocarcinoma. Pancreatectomy is associated with a low mortality rate (<5%) but a relatively high morbidity, with postoperative complications over 20% even in high-volume pancreatic surgical centers. Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) is the most common and important complication following pancreatectomy.

Currently, open, laparoscopic and robotic pancreatic surgery is performed.

This Special Issue on “Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery” will cover all aspects of pancreatic surgery, with a focus on techniques and results of pancreatectomy.  

We invite original research and review papers regarding various techniques as well as short- and long-term results of pancreatic resection, including pancreatectomy combined vascular resection in pancreatectomy for pancreatic cancer. In addition, papers related to various aspects of pancreatic surgery performed in chronic pancreatitis drainage operations (Puestow, Partington–Rochelle, and Duval procedures), resection operations (partial and subtotal or total pancreatectomies), and resections with extended drainage (Beger and Frey procedures) are invited.

Dr. Beata Jabłońska
Dr. Sławomir Mrowiec
Dr. Vincenzo Davide Palumbo
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • pancreatectomy
  • pancreaticoduodenectomy
  • central pancreatectomy
  • distal pancreatic resection
  • total pancreatectomy
  • pancreaticojejunostomy
  • venous resection
  • arterial resection
  • postoperative pancreatic fistula

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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6 pages, 230 KiB  
Editorial
Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery
by Beata Jabłońska and Sławomir Mrowiec
Life 2023, 13(6), 1400; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13061400 - 16 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1607
Abstract
Pancreatectomy, including pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), as well as central pancreatectomy (CP), distal pancreatectomy (DP) and total/subtotal pancreatectomy, is a major, complex and difficult surgical procedure performed for various benign and malignant pancreatic diseases: from chronic pancreatitis, through benign cystic tumors and neuroendocrine neoplasms to [...] Read more.
Pancreatectomy, including pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), as well as central pancreatectomy (CP), distal pancreatectomy (DP) and total/subtotal pancreatectomy, is a major, complex and difficult surgical procedure performed for various benign and malignant pancreatic diseases: from chronic pancreatitis, through benign cystic tumors and neuroendocrine neoplasms to malignant neoplasms, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery)

Research

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13 pages, 1645 KiB  
Article
Risk Factors of Postoperative Acute Pancreatitis and Its Impact on the Postoperative Course after Pancreaticoduodenectomy—10 Years of Single-Center Experience
by Magdalena Gajda, Ewa Grudzińska, Paweł Szmigiel, Piotr Czopek, Cezary Rusinowski, Zbigniew Putowski and Sławomir Mrowiec
Life 2023, 13(12), 2344; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122344 - 15 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 900
Abstract
Background: Clinically relevant acute postoperative pancreatitis (CR-PPAP) after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is a complication that may lead to the development of local and systemic consequences. The study aimed to identify risk factors for CR-PPAP and assess the impact of CR-PPAP on the postoperative course [...] Read more.
Background: Clinically relevant acute postoperative pancreatitis (CR-PPAP) after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) is a complication that may lead to the development of local and systemic consequences. The study aimed to identify risk factors for CR-PPAP and assess the impact of CR-PPAP on the postoperative course after PD. Methods: The study retrospectively analyzed data from 428 consecutive patients who underwent PD at a single center between January 2013 and December 2022. The presence of increased amylase activity in plasma, above the upper limit of normal 48 h after surgery, was checked. CR-PPAP was diagnosed when accompanied by disturbing radiological features and/or symptoms requiring treatment. We investigated the relationship between the occurrence of CR-PPAP and the development of postoperative complications after PD, and possible predictors of CR-PPAP. Results: The postoperative follow-up period was 90 days. Of the 428 patients, 18.2% (n = 78) had CR-PPAP. It was associated with increased rates of CR-POPF, delayed gastric emptying, occurrence of intra-abdominal collections, postoperative hemorrhage, peritonitis, and septic shock. Patients who developed CR-PPAP were more often reoperated (37.17% vs. 6.9%, p < 0.0001)) and had increased postoperative mortality (14.1% vs. 5.74%, p < 0.0001). Soft pancreatic parenchyma, intraoperative blood loss, small diameter of the pancreatic duct, and diagnosis of adenocarcinoma papillae Vateri were independent risk factors for CR-PPAP and showed the best performance in predicting CR-PPAP. Conclusions: CR-PPAP is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative complications after PD, worse treatment outcomes, and an increased risk of reoperation and mortality. Pancreatic consistency, intraoperative blood loss, width of the duct of Wirsung, and histopathological diagnosis can be used to assess the risk of CR-PPAP. Amylase activity 48 h after surgery > 161 U/L is highly specific in the diagnosis of CR-PPAP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery)
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12 pages, 723 KiB  
Article
The Relation between Post-Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography Pancreatitis and Different Cannulation Techniques: The Experience of a High-Volume Center from North-Eastern Romania
by Stefan Chiriac, Catalin Victor Sfarti, Carol Stanciu, Camelia Cojocariu, Sebastian Zenovia, Robert Nastasa and Anca Trifan
Life 2023, 13(6), 1410; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13061410 - 19 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Background: Despite numerous advances that have aimed to increase the safety of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) still remains a major issue. We aimed to assess the rate of PEP as well as the relation to the cannulation techniques in our [...] Read more.
Background: Despite numerous advances that have aimed to increase the safety of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP) still remains a major issue. We aimed to assess the rate of PEP as well as the relation to the cannulation techniques in our unit, a high-volume center in north-eastern Romania. Methods: ERCPs performed in our unit from March to August 2022 were retrospectively included. Data concerning demographic information, presence of difficult cannulation, the technique used for cannulation, as well as immediate complications, were gathered from the electronic database. Results: 233 ERCPs were included. PEP was diagnosed in 23 (9.9%) of cases. Precut sphincterotomy (PS), transpancreatic sphincterotomy (TPBS), and a combination of TPBS and PS were performed in 6.4%, 10.3%, and 1.7% of cases, respectively, while an Erlangen precut papillotomy was performed in one case. Both in patients with PS and TPBS the rate of PEP was 20%. When the two techniques were associated, the rate of PEP was 25%. TPBS and PS represented risk factors for PEP (OR 1.211 for a CI of 0.946–1.551, p = 0.041, and OR 1.124 for a CI of 0.928–1.361, p = 0.088, respectively). No PEP-associated deaths were found. Conclusions: Both PS and TPBS presented a similar risk of PEP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery)
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Other

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25 pages, 4466 KiB  
Systematic Review
Incidence and Clinical Implications of Anatomical Variations in the Pancreas and Its Ductal System: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Mathias Orellana-Donoso, Daniel Milos-Brandenberg, Andoni Benavente-Urtubia, Javier Guerra-Loyola, Alejandro Bruna-Mejias, Pablo Nova-Baeza, Álvaro Becerra-Farfán, Walter Sepulveda-Loyola, Ricardo Miguel Luque-Bernal and Juan José Valenzuela-Fuenzalida
Life 2023, 13(8), 1710; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13081710 - 9 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Objective: This systematic review analyzes the anatomical variants in the pancreas and its ductal system to report on their association with pancreatic pathologies. Methods: We conducted a search of the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and LILACS databases from their [...] Read more.
Objective: This systematic review analyzes the anatomical variants in the pancreas and its ductal system to report on their association with pancreatic pathologies. Methods: We conducted a search of the MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, CINAHL, and LILACS databases from their inception to July 2023. The methodological quality was assessed with the Anatomical Quality Assessment (AQUA) tool. Finally, the pooled prevalence was estimated using a random effects model. Results: 55 studies were found that met the eligibility criteria. The overall prevalence of pancreas divisum (PD) was 18% (95% CI = 15–21%). The prevalence of PD associated with pancreatitis was 30% (95% CI = 1–61%). Conclusions: An anatomical variant of the pancreas such as PD may be the cause of bile duct obstruction, resulting in various clinical complications, such as pancreatitis. Hence, knowing this variant is extremely important for surgeons, especially for those who treat the gastroduodenal region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pancreatectomy and Pancreatic Surgery)
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