Research Advances in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology and Tissue Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 5998

Special Issue Editors

Linda and Mitch Hart Center for Regenerative and Personalized Medicine, Steadman Philippon Research Institute, 181 W Meadow Dr, Suite 1000, Vail, CO, USA
Interests: stem cell; growth factor; biomaterials; bone tissue engineering; bone biology; cartilage tissue engineering and biology; gene therapy

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Guest Editor
Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, LT-49264 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: stem cell; growth factor; biomaterials; bone tissue engineering; cartilage tissue engineering; exosome

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Guest Editor
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA
Interests: musculoskeletal tissue engineering; cartilage tissue engineering; biomaterials; bone biology; muscular dystrophy; signaling pathways

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bone and cartilage are important organ/tissues that are responsible for human body movement. Fracture non-union or segmental bone defects are clinical challenges for orthopedic surgeons. Osteoporosis greatly increases the risk of fractures in the older population. Bone healing disorders significantly affect patients’ quality of life and can even cause disability. Articular cartilage that covers the joint surfaces has limited capacity for self-repair and healing due to the lack of blood vessels. Adult cartilage injuries larger than 5 mm never heal without intervention. Age-related or post-traumatic arthritis affected 32.5 million USA adults and estimated 654.1 million individuals (40 years and older) with knee OA in 2020 worldwide. Currently, joint replacement remains the ultimate cure. Sports-injury-related cartilage damage significantly affects return to play for professional or recreational players. Researchers in the past two decades have made significant advances using stem cells, gene therapy, and sustained release of biomaterials for the delivery of growth factors for bone and cartilage regeneration, but few have translated these achievements into new clinical therapies for treating patients and curing these diseases.

Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to bring multidisciplinary research scholars together and publish original research or review articles that summarize recent advances in bone and cartilage tissue engineering and repair. These include the use of stem cells, gene therapy including mRNA technology, and biomaterials for sustained release of therapeutic growth factors for promoting endogenous stem-cell-mediated bone and cartilage regeneration and repair. The ultimate goal is to encourage researchers to develop new therapies for treating bone defects or cartilage damage, including OA and traumatic injury.

Topics include but are not limited to:

  • Stem cells for bone tissue engineering and regeneration;
  • Stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering and regeneration;
  • Gene therapy for bone defect repair and tissue engineering;
  • Gene therapy for cartilage tissue engineering and repair;
  • Biomaterials, delivery of growth factors for bone tissue engineering;
  • Biomaterials, delivery of growth factors for cartilage repair;
  • Novel techniques including exosome and miRNA for cartilage repair.

Dr. Xueqin Gao
Prof. Dr. Arvydas Usas
Dr. Hongshuai Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stem cells for bone and cartilage repair
  • gene therapy for bone and cartilage repair
  • bone defect and regeneration
  • cartilage tissue engineering
  • growth factors
  • biomaterials for bone tissue engineering
  • biomaterials for cartilage tissue engineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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9 pages, 1569 KiB  
Communication
Bovine Grafting: An Effective Alternative after Curettage of Benign Bone Tumors
by Priscilla Montanhini, Bruno P. Antunes, Julie Francine Cerutti Pestilho, Carlos Roberto Galia, Alex Guedes and Ricardo Gehrke Becker
Life 2023, 13(3), 789; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13030789 - 15 Mar 2023
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Abstract
We retrospectively reviewed 28 patients (15 women and 13 men) with benign bone tumors or pseudotumors treated with curettage and filling with freeze-dried bovine bone graft Orthogen (Baumer S/A, São Paulo, Brazil). The aim of the study was to evaluate the rate of [...] Read more.
We retrospectively reviewed 28 patients (15 women and 13 men) with benign bone tumors or pseudotumors treated with curettage and filling with freeze-dried bovine bone graft Orthogen (Baumer S/A, São Paulo, Brazil). The aim of the study was to evaluate the rate of incorporation of Orthogen into the host bone, as well as to describe the outcomes of bone healing (quality, time, and complications). General characteristics, tumor volume, size, site, complications, percent filled, and healing quality at 6 and 12 months were assessed through radiographs. Mean patient age was 20.5 (range 4.7–75.1) years. The most common lesion type was simple bone cyst (12/28), and the most common sites were the tibia (7/28) and humerus (7/28). There were no postoperative pathologic fractures. Two cases (7.1%) of serous fluid leakage through the wound occurred. Mean cavity volume was 20.1 (range 2.7–101.4) cm3. At 6 and 12 months, 75% and 77.8% of cavities, respectively, showed complete bone healing. At 12 months, 81% of cavities filled >90% with graft showed complete bone healing vs. only 19% of those filled <90%. Filling with bovine bone graft resulted in few complications and excellent healing after curettage of benign bone tumors or pseudotumors. Complete healing occurred in most cases by 12 months. Cavities with a higher percentage of filling had a higher rate of complete radiographic incorporation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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Review

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35 pages, 1773 KiB  
Review
Stem Cells and Bone Tissue Engineering
by Xueqin Gao, Joseph J. Ruzbarsky, Jonathan E. Layne, Xiang Xiao and Johnny Huard
Life 2024, 14(3), 287; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14030287 - 21 Feb 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1662
Abstract
Segmental bone defects that are caused by trauma, infection, tumor resection, or osteoporotic fractures present significant surgical treatment challenges. Host bone autograft is considered the gold standard for restoring function but comes with the cost of harvest site comorbidity. Allograft bone is a [...] Read more.
Segmental bone defects that are caused by trauma, infection, tumor resection, or osteoporotic fractures present significant surgical treatment challenges. Host bone autograft is considered the gold standard for restoring function but comes with the cost of harvest site comorbidity. Allograft bone is a secondary option but has its own limitations in the incorporation with the host bone as well as its cost. Therefore, developing new bone tissue engineering strategies to treat bone defects is critically needed. In the past three decades, the use of stem cells that are delivered with different scaffolds or growth factors for bone tissue engineering has made tremendous progress. Many varieties of stem cells have been isolated from different tissues for use in bone tissue engineering. This review summarizes the progress in using different postnatal stem cells, including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, muscle-derived stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, dental pulp stem cells/periodontal ligament stem cells, periosteum stem cells, umbilical cord-derived stem cells, peripheral blood stem cells, urine-derived stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, and induced pluripotent stem cells, for bone tissue engineering and repair. This review also summarizes the progress using exosomes or extracellular vesicles that are delivered with various scaffolds for bone repair. The advantages and disadvantages of each type of stem cell are also discussed and explained in detail. It is hoped that in the future, these preclinical results will translate into new regenerative therapies for bone defect repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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15 pages, 547 KiB  
Review
Alzheimer’s Disease and Impaired Bone Microarchitecture, Regeneration and Potential Genetic Links
by Min Zhang, Shunze Hu and Xuying Sun
Life 2023, 13(2), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13020373 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2195
Abstract
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and osteoporosis are both age-related degenerative diseases. Many studies indicate that these two diseases share common pathogenesis mechanisms. In this review, the osteoporotic phenotype of AD mouse models was discussed, and shared mechanisms such as hormonal imbalance, genetic factors, similar [...] Read more.
Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and osteoporosis are both age-related degenerative diseases. Many studies indicate that these two diseases share common pathogenesis mechanisms. In this review, the osteoporotic phenotype of AD mouse models was discussed, and shared mechanisms such as hormonal imbalance, genetic factors, similar signaling pathways and impaired neurotransmitters were identified. Moreover, the review provides recent data associated with these two diseases. Furthermore, potential therapeutic approaches targeting both diseases were discussed. Thus, we proposed that preventing bone loss should be one of the most important treatment goals in patients with AD; treatment targeting brain disorders is also beneficial for osteoporosis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Research Advances in Bone and Cartilage Tissue Engineering)
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