New Insights into Pediatric Cardiology

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 3330

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatric and Adult Congenital Cardiology, University Hospital of Bordeaux, 33600 Bordeaux, France
Interests: echocardiography; pediatric cardiology, congenital heart disease; congenital cardiopathy in adults; artificial intelligence; automatic measurements
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 020021 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: pediatric cardiology; echocardiography; arterial hypertension; interventional cardiology; arrhythmias; congenital heart disease; genetic testing; clinical practice
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, diagnostic modalities and therapeutic options in pediatric cardiology have shown revolutionary developments, resulting in the development of newer medical, interventional, and surgical techniques with increasing survival rates. A continuous improvement in the quality of life of these patients has been achieved. Modern treatment of congenital heart malformations has led to normal or near-normal adult life, even in many complicated malformations that were previously fatal.

Pediatric cardiology problems will persist but change their course due to prenatal interventions and early postnatal treatment.

Early interventions have created a new population of adult heart patients. Even though most patients have excellent postoperative outcomes, they can develop new secondary cardiovascular problems. These will require regular medical follow-up and possibly more secondary cardiovascular interventions.

Over the years, genetics, embryology, and morphology have increased our knowledge of cardiovascular development and the inheritance of certain diseases.

The pediatric cardiac population that will reach adulthood is progressively increasing; thus, the medical community faces new challenges—some of these will involve pediatric cardiologists, but predominantly adult cardiologists and cardiovascular surgeons.

The pediatric cardiology patient population is smaller than that of adult cardiology but has equal needs. Human and material resources are mandatory to achieve and maintain a continuously high standard of care.

This Special Issue aims to provide a rich mix of original papers, reviews, and case reports on many aspects of understanding, managing, and preventing cardiovascular disease in childhood. Primary care in pediatric cardiology must be concerned with preventing heart disease and detecting existing conditions early. In addition, pediatricians must maintain the vigilance of 'healthy' children to control cardiovascular risk in adulthood. With these goals in mind, the potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • pediatric cardiology;
  • congenital heart disease;
  • echocardiography;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • ventricular septal defect;
  • pulmonary stenosis;
  • coarctation of the aorta;
  • atrial septal defect;
  • pulmonary hypertension;
  • arterial hypertension;
  • syncope;
  • arrhythmias;
  • cardiac transplantation;
  • cardiomyopathy;
  • pediatric interventional cardiology;
  • children;
  • newborn;
  • cardiac surgery, and family practice for congenital heart disease.

Dr. Corina Maria Maria Vasile
Dr. Eliza Elena Cintezǎ
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Life is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • pediatric cardiology
  • patentus ductus arteriosus
  • interventional cardiology
  • cardiac catheterization
  • echocardiography
  • congenital heart disease
  • cardiac enzymes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

11 pages, 4005 KiB  
Review
Surgical Patching in Congenital Heart Disease: The Role of Imaging and Modelling
by Yousef Aljassam, Massimo Caputo and Giovanni Biglino
Life 2023, 13(12), 2295; https://doi.org/10.3390/life13122295 - 2 Dec 2023
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Abstract
In congenital heart disease, patches are not tailored to patient-specific anatomies, leading to shape mismatch with likely functional implications. The design of patches through imaging and modelling may be beneficial, as it could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the costs associated with redo [...] Read more.
In congenital heart disease, patches are not tailored to patient-specific anatomies, leading to shape mismatch with likely functional implications. The design of patches through imaging and modelling may be beneficial, as it could improve clinical outcomes and reduce the costs associated with redo procedures. Whilst attention has been paid to the material of the patches used in congenital surgery, this review outlines the current knowledge on this subject and isolated experimental work that uses modelling and imaging-derived information (including 3D printing) to inform the design of the surgical patch. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Pediatric Cardiology)
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11 pages, 292 KiB  
Review
An Up-to-Date Literature Review on Ventricular Assist Devices Experience in Pediatric Hearts
by Ștefana Maria Moisă, Alexandru Burlacu, Crischentian Brinza, Eliza Cinteză, Lăcrămioara Ionela Butnariu, Elena Țarcă, Alexandru Florinel Oancea, Ioana-Alecsandra Munteanu, Valentin Munteanu, Laura Stătescu and Laura Mihaela Trandafir
Life 2022, 12(12), 2001; https://doi.org/10.3390/life12122001 - 30 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1378
Abstract
Ventricular assist devices (VAD) have gained popularity in the pediatric population during recent years, as more and more children require a heart transplant due to improved palliation methods, allowing congenital heart defect patients and children with cardiomyopathies to live longer. Eventually, these children [...] Read more.
Ventricular assist devices (VAD) have gained popularity in the pediatric population during recent years, as more and more children require a heart transplant due to improved palliation methods, allowing congenital heart defect patients and children with cardiomyopathies to live longer. Eventually, these children may require heart transplantation, and ventricular assist devices provide a bridge to transplantation in these cases. The FDA has so far approved two types of device: pulsatile and continuous flow (non-pulsatile), which can be axial and centrifugal. Potential eligible studies were searched in three databases: Medline, Embase, and ScienceDirect. Our endeavor retrieved 16 eligible studies focusing on five ventricular assist devices in children. We critically reviewed ventricular assist devices approved for pediatric use in terms of implant indication, main adverse effects, and outcomes. The main adverse effects associated with these devices have been noted to be thromboembolism, infection, bleeding, and hemolysis. However, utilizing left VAD early on, before end-organ dysfunction and deterioration of heart function, may give the patient enough time to recuperate before considering a more long-term solution for ventricular support. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Insights into Pediatric Cardiology)
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