The Effects of Neurosteroids on Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

A special issue of Life (ISSN 2075-1729). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 November 2024 | Viewed by 1138

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Bowles Center for Alcohol Studies, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 3027 Thurston Bowles Building, CB 7178, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Interests: neurosteroids; neuroinflammation; inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signals; toll-like receptors; alcohol use disorders; postpartum depression

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite your contributions to our Special Issue on 'Neurosteroids in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders.' This research collection explores the therapeutic potential of neuroactive steroids in various neurological and psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, substance use disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, schizophrenia, seizure disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders, and neurological injuries. Neurosteroids have pleiotropic effects, regulating critical systems such as neurotransmission, neuroendocrine pathways, neuroinflammation, and the immune response. They also influence neuroplasticity, synaptic plasticity, and neurodevelopment while displaying neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory properties that hold promise for both the prevention and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. We welcome contributions that delve into the mechanisms underlying neurosteroids’ effects, potentially leading to new treatment strategies. Discussion of the cautions and limitations of neurosteroid therapy is encouraged, recognizing the necessity for comprehensive clinical studies to unlock their full potential. Join us in advancing our understanding of neurosteroids' impact on human health and forging novel therapeutic interventions.

Dr. Irina S. Balan
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • pregnane neurosteroids
  • androstane neurosteroids
  • sulfated neurosteroids
  • neuroactive steroids
  • neurological disorders
  • psychiatric disorders
  • therapeutic potential
  • neuroprotective properties
  • anti-inflammatory properties

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

62 pages, 2061 KiB  
Review
Neuroactive Steroids, Toll-like Receptors, and Neuroimmune Regulation: Insights into Their Impact on Neuropsychiatric Disorders
by Irina Balan, Giorgia Boero, Samantha Lucenell Chéry, Minna H. McFarland, Alejandro G. Lopez and A. Leslie Morrow
Life 2024, 14(5), 582; https://doi.org/10.3390/life14050582 - 30 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Pregnane neuroactive steroids, notably allopregnanolone and pregnenolone, exhibit efficacy in mitigating inflammatory signals triggered by toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, thus attenuating the production of inflammatory factors. Clinical studies highlight their therapeutic potential, particularly in conditions like postpartum depression (PPD), where the FDA-approved compound [...] Read more.
Pregnane neuroactive steroids, notably allopregnanolone and pregnenolone, exhibit efficacy in mitigating inflammatory signals triggered by toll-like receptor (TLR) activation, thus attenuating the production of inflammatory factors. Clinical studies highlight their therapeutic potential, particularly in conditions like postpartum depression (PPD), where the FDA-approved compound brexanolone, an intravenous formulation of allopregnanolone, effectively suppresses TLR-mediated inflammatory pathways, predicting symptom improvement. Additionally, pregnane neurosteroids exhibit trophic and anti-inflammatory properties, stimulating the production of vital trophic proteins and anti-inflammatory factors. Androstane neuroactive steroids, including estrogens and androgens, along with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), display diverse effects on TLR expression and activation. Notably, androstenediol (ADIOL), an androstane neurosteroid, emerges as a potent anti-inflammatory agent, promising for therapeutic interventions. The dysregulation of immune responses via TLR signaling alongside reduced levels of endogenous neurosteroids significantly contributes to symptom severity across various neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroactive steroids, such as allopregnanolone, demonstrate efficacy in alleviating symptoms of various neuropsychiatric disorders and modulating neuroimmune responses, offering potential intervention avenues. This review emphasizes the significant therapeutic potential of neuroactive steroids in modulating TLR signaling pathways, particularly in addressing inflammatory processes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. It advances our understanding of the complex interplay between neuroactive steroids and immune responses, paving the way for personalized treatment strategies tailored to individual needs and providing insights for future research aimed at unraveling the intricacies of neuropsychiatric disorders. Full article
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