Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 8930

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Applied Sciences, WSB University, 41-300 Dąbrowa Górnicza, Poland
Interests: cross-border cooperation (CBC); environmental impact assessment; international cooperation; landscape architecture; regional planning; spatial planning and territorial governance; strategic and common planning; sustainable tourism; urban and city planning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
School of Agricultural Engineering, University of Extremadura, 06007 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: IT infrastructure; planning; geographic information system; spatial analysis; transportation planning regional; planning spatial; statistics; accessibility and mobilities; research transportation; housing; transport; rails; sustainable development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. José Martín Gallardo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science, University of Extremadura, Avda.Elvas s/n, 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: applied ecology; sustainable development
Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Extremadura, Av. de Elvas, s.n., 06006 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: applied ecology; landscape ecology; cross-border cooperation; sustainable development; territorial governance and management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco, Escola Superior Agrária, Quinta da Sr. de Mércules, 6001-909 Castelo Branco, Portugal
Interests: land-use planning; eco-tourism; sustainable planning; sustainable development; tourism sustainability; environmental impact assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Borderland synergies have reached unprecedented levels in the last few years due to their potential for regional integration and role in supranational processes, i.e., infrastructure construction and planning activities on European territories (among other). Although cross-border cooperation experiences have grown in Europe and worldwide, generating a global network of relationships is aimed at creating mutually beneficial scenarios. Thereby, research on this typology of cooperation is essential for planning for the future of our territories, businesses, and societies. Contextually, examining how the land use has changed in those regions is pivotal to our understanding of this issue.

This Special Issue seeks to present a collection of papers that explore the contribution of land use changes and covers in borderlands and similar territories, such as the so-called ultra-peripheral territories.

Dr. Rui Alexandre Castanho
Dr. José Manuel Naranjo Gómez
Prof. Dr. José Martín Gallardo
Dr. José Cabezas Fernández
Prof. Dr. Luís Quinta-Nova
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Land is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • cross-border cooperation
  • land use changes/cover
  • GIS
  • regional development
  • regional studies
  • sustainable planning
  • insular territories
  • territorial governance and management
  • common planning
  • resources sharing
  • strategic planning
  • sustainable planning

Published Papers (5 papers)

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16 pages, 8093 KiB  
Article
GIS-Based Multi-Criteria Analysis for Selecting Suitable Areas for Urban Green Spaces in Abomey-Calavi District, Southern Benin
Land 2023, 12(8), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12081553 - 05 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1132
Abstract
Green spaces contribute to a significant improvement in quality of life and maintain the sustainability of cities. In Benin, despite the political willingness regarding greening, municipalities are experiencing technical issues in finding suitable spaces to achieve this goal. This study should therefore be [...] Read more.
Green spaces contribute to a significant improvement in quality of life and maintain the sustainability of cities. In Benin, despite the political willingness regarding greening, municipalities are experiencing technical issues in finding suitable spaces to achieve this goal. This study should therefore be applicable to many other towns in Benin. It aims at identifying suitable areas for green spaces to integrate landscaping into urban planning in Abomey-Calavi district. Multi-criteria analysis combining GIS and the hierarchical classification approach was performed. Six factors (land use, altitude, slope, distance from main roads, proximity to urban centres and distance from flood zones, water bodies) were combined using the ArcGIS “Spatial Analysis” extension to generate a map of green space suitability. The results show large areas of land, of which 23.27% is very suitable and 26.06% is suitable for landscaping in this municipality. The ranking of the factors revealed that elevation, proximity to road networks, large conurbations and distance from wetlands accounted for 18%, compared with 14% for the other factors regarding the study environment. However, the use of these results must take into account the existing inhabited areas for a good site selection. These outputs provide guidance for decision-makers in choosing suitable sites for green spaces and integrating them into sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions)
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13 pages, 2690 KiB  
Article
The Perception of the Impact of Land-Use on Small and Large Cities by Tourists Using p2p Platforms
Land 2023, 12(4), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12040899 - 17 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 828
Abstract
In the literature, numerous impacts on local communities associated with the activity of online platforms for the intermediation of tourist accommodation have been described. Previous studies analyzed the perception associated with some of these impacts; however, the importance attributed by tourists using p2p [...] Read more.
In the literature, numerous impacts on local communities associated with the activity of online platforms for the intermediation of tourist accommodation have been described. Previous studies analyzed the perception associated with some of these impacts; however, the importance attributed by tourists using p2p platforms to the impact of the use of land has not been analyzed. Moreover, few studies have explored the different perceptions of these impacts on small and large cities. Therefore, this work, based on the information provided by 294 surveys associated with an online MOOC, analyzes the perception of users (tourists) of these p2p platforms on the impact of the use of land in small and large cities. The results have demonstrated that there is a great difference between the perception of respondents on this impact, with a worse perception of the use of p2p platforms by tourists who live in cities with a greater number of inhabitants. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions)
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20 pages, 1480 KiB  
Article
The Last Attempt at Land Reform in Spain: Application and Scope of the Andalusian Agrarian Reform, 1984–2011
Land 2023, 12(3), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12030683 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1242 | Correction
Abstract
In this article, we contextualise, describe and analyse the last attempt at land reform in Spain—the one passed by the Autonomous Parliament of Andalusia in 1984. The Andalusians had passed their Statute of Autonomy by referendum in 1981, incorporating the mandate to carry [...] Read more.
In this article, we contextualise, describe and analyse the last attempt at land reform in Spain—the one passed by the Autonomous Parliament of Andalusia in 1984. The Andalusians had passed their Statute of Autonomy by referendum in 1981, incorporating the mandate to carry out an agrarian reform that would boost the rural economy, generate employment and balance the agricultural structure of this region in Southern Spain, peripheral to both national and European centres of power. The Andalusian socialist government complied with this mandate, pushing the agrarian reform law through and applying a package of reform measures, which met with resistance from landowners and conservative political forces from the outset. Political, economic, legal and administrative obstacles swiftly discouraged the Andalusian socialists from persevering in the endeavour, and at the beginning of the nineties, its dismantling began. Finally, in 2011 the end of the agrarian reform was declared, and with it, the waiver of the right to consider alternative models to the liberal management of the agricultural sector. Archives and newspaper libraries, as well as administrative and legal sources, have been consulted, and the information has been examined using content analysis and cross-checked and triangulated with the specialised literature. This article hails a breakthrough in the understanding of the socio-territorial scopes of an agrarian reform little studied to date. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions)
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23 pages, 691 KiB  
Article
Profitability Analysis and Input Use Efficiency of Maize Cultivation in Selected Areas of Bangladesh
Land 2023, 12(1), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12010023 - 21 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 4165
Abstract
Maize farmers in Bangladesh are unaware of the benefits of maize cultivation due to a lack of information and concept generation. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cost and return of maize cultivation; assess the input use efficiency of maize [...] Read more.
Maize farmers in Bangladesh are unaware of the benefits of maize cultivation due to a lack of information and concept generation. The objectives of this study were to estimate the cost and return of maize cultivation; assess the input use efficiency of maize cultivation for marginal, small, and medium maize production to address the problems; and suggest policy recommendations. The study was conducted in six villages in the Chuadanga district in Bangladesh. Data were collected by using an interview schedule from the purposively selected 80 respondents during 1–30 June 2018. After analyzing the data, the total cost of production was Tk. 124,495, Tk. 134,335, and Tk. 140,579 for marginal, small, and medium maize production, respectively. Per hectare gross return was Tk. 213,997, Tk. 204,972, and Tk. 197,163, and per hectare gross margin was Tk. 120,478, Tk. 104,748, and Tk. 92,516. Net return was calculated by deducting the gross cost from the gross return, and these were Tk. 89,502, Tk. 70,637, and Tk. 56,584. The benefit–cost ratio was 1.72, 1.53, and 1.40 for marginal, small, and medium maize production, respectively. From Cobb–Douglas production function analysis, it was observed that the coefficients of land preparation cost, irrigation cost, urea, and MoP cost were significant at different levels of probability for marginal, small, and medium maize production, and the coefficients of human labor cost, seed and pesticide used was not significant while the coefficients of TSP was negative and significant. This study also identified some of the problems associated with maize production. The findings revealed that the high price of inputs was the most acute problem, followed by a lack of technical knowledge and shortage of human labor at the critical stage, and declining soil fertility was the last obstacle that stood in the way of maize production in the study area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions)
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1 pages, 195 KiB  
Correction
Correction: Díaz-Diego et al. The Last Attempt at Land Reform in Spain: Application and Scope of the Andalusian Agrarian Reform, 1984–2011. Land 2023, 12, 683
Land 2023, 12(11), 1971; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12111971 - 26 Oct 2023
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Abstract
In the original publication [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land-Use Planning in Borderlands and Ultra-Peripheral Regions)
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