Nexus between Politics and Economics in the Emerging Countries - II

A special issue of Economies (ISSN 2227-7099).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2023) | Viewed by 22446

Special Issue Editors

Faculty of Applied Sciences, WSB University, 41-300 Dąbrowa Górnicza, Poland
Interests: cross-border cooperation (CBC); environmental impact assessment; international cooperation; landscape architecture; regional planning; spatial planning and territorial governance; strategic and common planning; sustainable tourism; urban and city planning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Economics, Faculty of Economic and Administrative Science, Yıldız Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey
Interests: economic theory; economic history; behavioral economics; history of economic thought; economic methodology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Faculty of Economic and Administrative Science, Department of Banking and Finance, Lefke, European University of Lefke, Northern Cyprus, TR-10, Mersin, Turkey
Interests: environmental economics and macroeconomics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is widely accepted that political stability is a primary requirement for the development and nurturing of entrepreneurs, and for forecasting a nation’s long-term economic performance. On the other hand, economic development and financial performance may change the power balance in governments and lead to structural changes. The emerging countries have transformed themselves since the 1980s by liberalizing their markets, accelerating reforms, opening their economies to global trade, and adopting modern banking systems. Despite this transformation, the nexus between political stability and economic development, and the one between political stability and financial development, have not been comprehensively investigated. Therefore, this Special Issue invites the submission of research that explicitly looks at these nexuses in the emerging countries. Both qualitative and quantitative studies are welcome, as are empirical and theoretical contributions.

Prof. Dr. Rui Alexandre Castanho
Dr. Sema Yılmaz Genç
Dr. Dervis Kirikkaleli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • political economy
  • economic development
  • financial development
  • political stability
  • emerging countries

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 507 KiB  
Article
An Empirical Study of Trade in Goods between China and Brazil: Analysis of Competitiveness and Complementarity
Economies 2023, 11(9), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies11090224 - 01 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1174
Abstract
China and Brazil established the “Comprehensive Strategic Partnership” in 2012. Since the establishment of the partnership, China and Brazil have continued to deepen economic and trade cooperation, and cooperation in various fields has achieved remarkable results. China has long been consistent in maintaining [...] Read more.
China and Brazil established the “Comprehensive Strategic Partnership” in 2012. Since the establishment of the partnership, China and Brazil have continued to deepen economic and trade cooperation, and cooperation in various fields has achieved remarkable results. China has long been consistent in maintaining its status as Brazil’s largest export destination and source of imports. The total volume of bilateral trade between China and Brazil has significantly increased, and the trade structure in goods is becoming increasingly diversified. The total volume of bilateral trade between China and Brazil has grown considerably, and the trade structure in goods has become increasingly diversified. On 20 April 2023, when Brazilian President Lula visited China, China and Brazil issued a joint statement on deepening the “Comprehensive Strategic Partnership”, further deepening the cooperation in trade in goods has become a consensus. From the perspective of goods trade under the comprehensive strategic partnership, the article analyses the complementarities and competitiveness of goods trade between China and Brazil with the help of relevant formulas to form a complete and transparent study of the goods trade between the two countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nexus between Politics and Economics in the Emerging Countries - II)
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21 pages, 460 KiB  
Article
Latin America and the Caribbean’s Productivity: The Role of Pro-Market Policies, Institutions, Infrastructure, and Natural Resource Endowments
Economies 2023, 11(5), 142; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies11050142 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1880
Abstract
This paper examines the role played by pro-market policies, institutions, natural resources, and infrastructure on the total factor productivity (TFP) of twenty Latin American and Caribbean countries over the period 2000–2018. In estimating the TFP, we use the Färe-Primont index based on DEA. [...] Read more.
This paper examines the role played by pro-market policies, institutions, natural resources, and infrastructure on the total factor productivity (TFP) of twenty Latin American and Caribbean countries over the period 2000–2018. In estimating the TFP, we use the Färe-Primont index based on DEA. We have verified cointegration and estimated the long-run parameters by the grouped-mean FMOLS estimator. For measuring the impact of institutions, natural resources, and infrastructure, we have used the Productive Capacity Indexes of UNCTAD. We found a positive effect of all these variables on the TFP. Natural resources and energy play the most important role. Followed by information and communication technology and institutions quality. Transport infrastructure has played a minor role. The pro-market policies have been measured by the Fraser Institute indexes. We verified the positive impact of pro-market policies in the area of international trade and financial openness through six different variables. Finally, we considered three areas to measure the impact of domestic regulations and policies; credit, labor and business. We could verify a positive impact of credit and business pro-market policies, but we did not get statistically significant results from the labor regulations index. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nexus between Politics and Economics in the Emerging Countries - II)
15 pages, 1126 KiB  
Article
The Nexus between Crime Rates, Poverty, and Income Inequality: A Case Study of Indonesia
Economies 2023, 11(2), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/economies11020062 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 18559
Abstract
This study examines whether income inequality and poverty are determinants of crime rates across 34 provinces in Indonesia. Three indicators of income inequality and four poverty measures are tested to examine whether the dimension and degree of unequal welfare distribution are linked to [...] Read more.
This study examines whether income inequality and poverty are determinants of crime rates across 34 provinces in Indonesia. Three indicators of income inequality and four poverty measures are tested to examine whether the dimension and degree of unequal welfare distribution are linked to crime occurrences. We use panel data from 2010 to 2019 with the Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) approach. The findings indicate that higher income levels and wider income inequality are associated with higher crime rates. Our first indicator of income inequality, non-food expenditure, has a larger impact on crime rates than our second and third indicators, i.e., the gap in food expenditure and the Gini ratio. Poverty is also positively associated with crime. The wider the poverty gap (a measure of poverty) and the severity index, the higher the deprivation levels among the poor, which lead to more crime. The significant and positive effect of poverty on crime rates, and the positive nexus between crime, income, and inequality suggest that Indonesia will face a higher crime risk as the country becomes increasingly more affluent. In such a scenario, policymakers can leverage education and investment (domestic and foreign) to minimize the crime rate. The government could also strengthen crime prevention programs, crime settlement systems, and policing in Indonesia, and raise the budget for social assistance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nexus between Politics and Economics in the Emerging Countries - II)
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