Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Medicine, Cell, and Organism Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 June 2023) | Viewed by 7042

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060, China
Interests: gastric cancer; immune checkpoint inhibitors; surgery; fatty acid metabolism
Department of General Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410011, China
Interests: hepatobiliary cancer; immune checkpoint inhibitors; surgery; translational research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gastric cancer remains a particularly lethal disease, having the fourth highest fatality rate and the fifth highest incidence rate worldwide, with half of all cases occurring in East Asian countries. This malignancy shows its symptoms in advanced stages. Therefore, one of the challenging issues regarding gastric cancer is the screening and diagnosis of these advanced stages, which causes a weak prognosis in patients with gastric malignancies. Research into various methods of early screening and diagnosis of gastric cancer, as well as new treatment options, is important for improving the prognosis. A better understanding of the different aspects of this disease could save millions of lives worldwide.

Given the importance of the early diagnosis and treatment of gastric malignancies, this Special Issue aims to bring together research that helps us to understand the innovations in screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastric cancer. This has an important role in the development of gastric cancer. Original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) all the aforementioned topics.

Dr. Wenhong Deng
Dr. Jun He
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • gastric cancer
  • screening
  • diagnosis
  • treatment
  • surgery
  • immune checkpoint inhibitors
  • translational research

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 171 KiB  
Editorial
Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment
by Li Liu and Wenhong Deng
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(1), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13010127 - 08 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1139
Abstract
Gastric cancer (GC) is an aggressive and heterogeneous malignancy that is one of the leading cancers in the world and an important global health problem due to its overall high prevalence and high mortality rate [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)

Research

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18 pages, 39695 KiB  
Article
Screening of Differentially Expressed Genes Based on the ACRG Molecular Subtypes of Gastric Cancer and the Significance and Mechanism of AGTR1 Gene Expression
by Haoran Zhang, Shuman Zhen, Pingan Ding, Bibo Tan, Hongyan Wang, Wenbo Liu, Yuan Tian and Qun Zhao
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(3), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13030560 - 20 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1463
Abstract
Background: The Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) classification is a molecular classification established based on the tissues of gastric cancer (GC) patients in Asia. Patients with different ACRG subtypes differ significantly with regard to treatment response and prognosis, which indicates that the ACRG [...] Read more.
Background: The Asian Cancer Research Group (ACRG) classification is a molecular classification established based on the tissues of gastric cancer (GC) patients in Asia. Patients with different ACRG subtypes differ significantly with regard to treatment response and prognosis, which indicates that the ACRG molecular classification is more valuable than the traditional pathological classification. However, the specific differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and the value of the ACRG molecular subtypes of GC have not been studied in depth. Methods: Through the analysis of the GEO database, the DEGs in GC tissues of different ACRG molecular subtypes were investigated. The expression and mechanism of the screened angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1) gene were bioinformatically analyzed and experimentally verified. The role of AGTR1 in GC cells was mainly investigated using CCK-8, wound-healing, transwell invasion assays, qRT-PCR, and Western blotting. Results: The bioinformatics results showed the presence of multiple DEGs in GC tissues with different ACRG molecular subtypes. Certain DEGs in GC tissues of different ACRG molecular subtypes have prognostic significance. AGTR1 levels in tumor tissues were significantly higher than in paired paracancerous tissues. The prognosis of GC patients with high expression of AGTR1 was poor (p < 0.05). The AGTR1 gene in GC samples was associated with the expression of immune pathways and immune checkpoint genes. After modifying AGTR1 expression in cell lines, cells’ proliferation, invasion, and migration abilities and the expression of related genes changed. Conclusions: There were significant DEGs in GC tissues with different ACGR molecular types, among which the increased expression of AGTR1 was a molecular feature of MSS/EMT type gastric cancer. Further study found that AGTR1 was closely related to tumor immune infiltration and invasion and may be a new therapeutic target gene for gastric cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)
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13 pages, 3128 KiB  
Article
The Prognostic Value of the GNRI in Patients with Stomach Cancer Undergoing Surgery
by Qianqian Zhang, Lilong Zhang, Qi Jin, Yongheng He, Mingsheng Wu, Hongxing Peng and Yijin Li
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(1), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13010155 - 13 Jan 2023
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2185
Abstract
Malnutrition often induces an adverse prognosis in cancer surgery patients. The elderly nutrition risk index (GNRI) is an example of the objective indicators of nutrition-related risks. We performed a meta-analysis to thoroughly examine the evidence for the GNRI in predicting the outcomes of [...] Read more.
Malnutrition often induces an adverse prognosis in cancer surgery patients. The elderly nutrition risk index (GNRI) is an example of the objective indicators of nutrition-related risks. We performed a meta-analysis to thoroughly examine the evidence for the GNRI in predicting the outcomes of patients undergoing stomach cancer surgery. Eligible articles were retrieved using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Google Scholar by 24 October 2022. The clinical outcomes were overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and post-operative complications. A total of 11 articles with 5593 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The combined forest plot showed that for every unit increase in the preoperative GNRI score in patients with stomach cancer, their postoperative mortality was reduced by 5.6% (HR: 0.944; 95% CI: 0.933–0.956, p < 0.001). The pooled results also demonstrated that a low GNRI was correlated with poor OS (HR: 2.052; 95% CI: 1.726–2.440, p < 0.001) and CSS (HR: 1.684; 95% CI: 1.249–2.270, p = 0.001) in patients who underwent stomach cancer surgery. Postoperative complications were more likely to occur in patients with a low GNRI, as opposed to those with a high GNRI (OR: 1.768; 95% CI: 1.445–2.163, p < 0.001). There was no evidence of significant heterogeneity, and the sensitivity analysis supported the stability and dependability of the above results. the GNRI is a valuable predictor of long-term outcomes and complications in stomach cancer patients undergoing surgery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)
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10 pages, 960 KiB  
Article
Comprehensive Analysis of Clinicopathological and Molecular Features to Predict Anti-PD-1-Based Therapy Efficacy in Patients with Advanced Gastric Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma
by Yan Hu, Nuo Chen, Ren-Ze Huang and Dong-Liang Chen
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(1), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13010115 - 04 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1752
Abstract
Background: Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a specific type of gastric cancer. The clinicopathological and molecular characteristics that can be used to predict the response to anti-PD-1 therapy for these patients are still not clear. Methods: Patients with advanced SRCC who received [...] Read more.
Background: Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a specific type of gastric cancer. The clinicopathological and molecular characteristics that can be used to predict the response to anti-PD-1 therapy for these patients are still not clear. Methods: Patients with advanced SRCC who received first-line anti-PD-1-based treatment were enrolled in this study. The clinicopathological characteristics of these patients were obtained from their medical records. The molecular features of these patients were analyzed by means of a next-generation-sequencing-based panel. The predictive significance of clinicopathological and molecular features for efficacy was analyzed. Results: A total of 71 patients with measurable lesions were included in this study, among which 46 patients had enough tissues for next-generation sequencing. The overall objective response rate (ORR) was 46.4%. ORR was significantly higher in mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient (dMMR) patients than in MMR-proficient (pMMR) patients, in patients with lymph node metastasis only than those with other metastasis sites, and in patients with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) of 0 than with a PS of 1 or 2. The progression-free survival was significantly longer in patients with dMMR, lymph node metastasis only, PD-L1 combined positive score (CPS) ≥ 5, and CDH1 wild type. Conclusions: Several clinicopathological and molecular features are associated with anti-PD-1 treatment efficacy in SRCC, which might be used to identify patients who can benefit most from these therapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer: Innovations in Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment)
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