Fungal-Nematode-Insect Interactions

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental and Ecological Interactions of Fungi".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 November 2024 | Viewed by 1233

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Institute for Environmental Studies/Department of Marine Sciences and Applied Biology, University of Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante, Spain
Interests: biocontrol; nematophagous fungi; entomopathogenic fungi; chitosan; plant pathology; endophytes; fungal "omics"
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Institute for Environmental Studies/Department of Marine Sciences and Applied Biology, University of Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante, Spain
Interests: biocontrol; nematophagous fungi; entomopathogenic fungi; chitosan; plant pathology; endophytes; fungal "omics"
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Interactions between fungi, nematodes and insects are universal in nature, and fungal–insect symbiosis benefits both fungus and insects greatly. Many fungi from different phyla are known to infect and kill insects and nematodes. Fungal pathogens can modify insect behavior to their benefit. In turn, insects can modify their behavior to prevent or minimize fungal infections. Little information is available on nematodes. Advances in research on fungal pathogen evolution and host adaptation, the underlying molecular mechanisms of pathogenicity (receptors, adhesives, enzymes, secondary metabolites, effectors) and immunity (melanisation) have been made due to comparative functional genomics studies on fungi, nematode and insects. Fungal pathogens of insects are used for sustainable management of pests in agriculture but can also be used to control insect vectors of animal and human pathogens. Nematophagous fungi are similarly applicable for a variety of uses, but they are less developed than their entomopathogenic counterparts. Therefore, enhancing our knowledge of infection and defense in fungus–insect interactions will help us to advance the development of this system for efficient biocontrol and cell factory sourcing of useful bioactive compounds. The relationship of nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi with plants is fascinating. Fungi can act as biofertilizers and enhance the growth and development of both model plants and crops. The cellular, agronomical and molecular basis of this component of the biology of these biocontrol fungi is just emerging.

The Special Issue will cover all aspects of fungal–nematode–insect interactions. Topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, biology, physiology, genetics and the -omics of nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, fungal–insect symbiosis, fungal infection and pathogenesis in insects, insect/nematode immunity to fungal infection and insect/nematode biocontrol with fungi. Authors may submit basic (laboratory), as well as applied (field), studies. Both reviews and original research articles discussing recent progress and advances in the field are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Luis Vicente López-Llorca
Dr. Federico Lopez-Moya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nematophagous fungi
  • entomopathogenic fungi
  • fungal "omics"
  • insect immunity
  • biocontrol
  • pathogenesis

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 2569 KiB  
Article
Arthropods as Vectors of Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens: Quantification of Phaeomoniella chlamydospora on Arthropods and Mycobiome Analysis of Earwig Exoskeletons
by Elisa Maria Brandenburg, Ralf Thomas Voegele, Michael Fischer and Falk Hubertus Behrens
J. Fungi 2024, 10(4), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof10040237 - 22 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Viticulture worldwide is challenged by grapevine trunk diseases (GTDs). Involvement of arthropods in the dissemination process of GTD pathogens, notably esca pathogens, is indicated after detection of associated pathogens on arthropod exoskeletons, and demonstration of transmission under artificial conditions. The present study is [...] Read more.
Viticulture worldwide is challenged by grapevine trunk diseases (GTDs). Involvement of arthropods in the dissemination process of GTD pathogens, notably esca pathogens, is indicated after detection of associated pathogens on arthropod exoskeletons, and demonstration of transmission under artificial conditions. The present study is the first to quantify spore loads via qPCR of the esca-relevant pathogen Phaeomoniella chlamydospora on arthropods collected in German vineyards, i.e., European earwigs (Forficula auricularia), ants (Formicidae), and two species of jumping spiders (Marpissa muscosa and Synageles venator). Quantification of spore loads showed acquisition on exoskeletons, but most arthropods carried only low amounts. The mycobiome on earwig exoskeletons was described for the first time to reveal involvement of earwigs in the dispersal of GTDs in general. Metabarcoding data support the potential risk of earwigs as vectors for predominantly Pa. chlamydospora and possibly Eutypa lata (causative agent of Eutypa dieback), as respective operational taxonomical unit (OTU) assigned genera had relative abundances of 6.6% and 2.8% in total reads, even though with great variation between samples. Seven further GTD-related genera were present at a very low level. As various factors influence the successful transmission of GTD pathogens, we hypothesize that arthropods might irregularly act as direct vectors. Our results highlight the importance of minimizing and protecting pruning wounds in the field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal-Nematode-Insect Interactions)
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