Marine and Coastal Hazards: Risk Identification, Monitoring, Assessment and Management

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Hazards".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 5 October 2024 | Viewed by 2273

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Hydraulic and Ocean Engineering, Coastal Ocean Monitoring Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan
Interests: hazardous waves (freak waves, typhoon waves); coastal flooding and protection; ocean measurement technology; wave statistics; meteo-oceanographic data analysis and interpretation
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine and coastal hazards pose significant risks to coastal communities, ecosystems and infrastructure worldwide. These hazards, including storms, flooding, erosion, tsunamis and climate change impacts, require effective identification, monitoring, assessment and management strategies to mitigate their potential consequences. This call for papers invites researchers, scientists and practitioners to contribute their expertise and findings to advance our understanding and management of marine and coastal hazards.

We welcome submissions on a wide range of topics related to marine and coastal hazards, including, but not limited to:

  1. Hazard identification and mapping techniques;
  2. Coastal vulnerability assessment and modeling;
  3. Risk assessment and management strategies;
  4. Climate change impacts on marine and coastal hazards;
  5. Storm surge and flooding prediction and mitigation;
  6. Erosion and sediment transport processes;
  7. Tsunami detection, warning systems and preparedness;
  8. Remote sensing and GIS applications in hazard monitoring;
  9. Coastal infrastructure resilience and adaptation.

Authors are invited to submit original research papers, review articles or case studies that address the aforementioned topics. Submissions should follow the guidelines provided by the journal or conference where the papers will be submitted. All submissions will undergo a peer review process to ensure the quality and relevance of the contributions.

Prof. Dr. Dong-Jiing Doong
Prof. Dr. Dong-Sheng Jeng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine and coastal hazards
  • risk assessment
  • marine meteorology
  • rip current
  • freak waves

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 14280 KiB  
Article
Risk Assessment for Recreational Activities in the Coastal Ocean
by Hui-Chieh Chuang, Dong-Jiing Doong, Chung-Ru Ho and Ya-Hui Ho
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(4), 604; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12040604 - 30 Mar 2024
Viewed by 738
Abstract
Ocean recreational activities (ORAs), including swimming, surfing, diving, paddleboarding, etc., in global marine areas are becoming increasingly popular. However, there are potential risks in coastal ocean environments. This study aims to establish a framework for assessing the risk according to the joint hazard [...] Read more.
Ocean recreational activities (ORAs), including swimming, surfing, diving, paddleboarding, etc., in global marine areas are becoming increasingly popular. However, there are potential risks in coastal ocean environments. This study aims to establish a framework for assessing the risk according to the joint hazard and vulnerability levels of the ORA environment. Important factors include meteo-ocean conditions, geographic features, biological and chemical characteristics, and records of historical accidents, as well as social, environmental and tourist perceptions. The fuzzy Delphi method (FDM) is used to screen the representative factors, followed by using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) to determine the weight of each factor. The results show that 9 hazard factors and 12 vulnerability factors are dominant. The framework is applied to 307 beaches in Taiwan, and 8% of them are categorized as very high risk and 13% as very low risk for ORAs. A risk map that displays the hazard, vulnerability, and overall risk levels is presented to tourists to provide quick access to risk information. Full article
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13 pages, 4055 KiB  
Article
A Review of Historical Volcanic Tsunamis: A New Scheme for a Volcanic Tsunami Monitoring System
by Tingting Fan, Yuchen Wang, Zhiguo Xu, Lining Sun, Peitao Wang and Jingming Hou
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2024, 12(2), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse12020278 - 3 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1129
Abstract
Tsunami monitoring and early warning systems are mainly established to deal with seismogenic tsunamis generated by sudden seafloor fault displacement. However, a global tsunami triggered by the 2022 Tonga volcanic eruption promoted the need for tsunami early warning and hazard mitigation of non-seismogenic [...] Read more.
Tsunami monitoring and early warning systems are mainly established to deal with seismogenic tsunamis generated by sudden seafloor fault displacement. However, a global tsunami triggered by the 2022 Tonga volcanic eruption promoted the need for tsunami early warning and hazard mitigation of non-seismogenic tsunamis in coastal countries. This paper studied the spatiotemporal distribution characteristics of historical volcanic tsunamis and summarized high-risk areas of volcanic tsunamis. The circum southwestern Pacific volcanic zone, including the Sunda volcanic belt and the Indo-Australian plate, is a concentrated area of active volcanoes and major volcanic tsunamis. In addition, the challenges associated with adapting seismogenic tsunami techniques for use in the context of volcanic tsunamis were elucidated. At the same time, based on historical records and post-disaster surveys, typical historical volcanic tsunami events and involved mechanisms were summarized. The results show that a majority of volcanic tsunamis may involve multiple generation mechanisms, and some mechanisms show geographical distribution characteristics. The complexity of volcanic tsunami mechanisms poses challenges to tsunami early warning by measuring tsunami sources to evaluate the possible extent of impact, or using numerical modeling to simulate the process of a tsunami. Therefore, a concise overview of the lessons learned and the current status of early warning systems for volcanic tsunamis was provided. Finally, a conceptual scheme of monitoring systems for volcanic tsunamis based on historical volcanoes, real-time volcanic eruption information and sea level data, as well as remote sensing images, was presented. Full article
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