The 10th Anniversary of JMSE — Recent Advances in Section Ocean Engineering

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2023) | Viewed by 6736

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine geoharzard covers wide range of marine science and engineering processes and issues. This research topic has attracted great attentions among marine engineers and scientists in recent years due to growth of huaman activities in marine environments. A better undertsanding of physic processes, an appropriate design of marine infrastructures and solutions of existing and furture marine geoharzard associated with the new developments in marien environments. This special issue will report recent advances in the field and provide future scopes for researchers.

In this Specia Issue, we are looking for the papers in the following theme (not limit to):

  • Marine energy systems (including offshore wind, wave and tidal energy etc.) and the associate engineering and sientific issues;
  • Natural disester including storm surge,a and earthquakes;
  • Marine slope stability and submainre debris flow;
  • Sediment transport in marine environments including deep water and shallow caostal regions;
  • Recent development of field measurements and observations in deep marine environments;
  • Development of marien ming such as gas hydrate and the associated engineering problem;
  • Fluid-structure-seabed interactions around marine infrastrcutures and associate seabed instability including liquefaction, scour and shear failure;
  • Hydordynamics in marine systems;
  • Solute transport in marine environments;

Prof. Dr. Dong-Sheng Jeng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • marine geoharzard
  • dynamic loading in marine environment
  • fluid-structure-seabed interactions
  • marine slope stability
  • earthquake
  • tasumani
  • marine infrastructures

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 2254 KiB  
Article
Design Wave Height Estimation under the Influence of Typhoon Frequency, Distance, and Intensity
by Guilin Liu, Wenjin Yang, Yunpeng Jiang, Jingyi Yin, Yuhang Tian, Liping Wang and Yu Xu
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(9), 1712; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11091712 - 30 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1008
Abstract
The extreme sea conditions caused by typhoons pose a threat to the design safety of marine and coastal engineering structures. In the past, design wave height calculation models that only considered the frequency of typhoons ignored the influence of other hazard factors of [...] Read more.
The extreme sea conditions caused by typhoons pose a threat to the design safety of marine and coastal engineering structures. In the past, design wave height calculation models that only considered the frequency of typhoons ignored the influence of other hazard factors of typhoons, resulting in lower design standards. In this paper, typhoon frequency, intensity, and distance are selected, and dimensional influences of different factors are eliminated through standardization processing. Based on the correlation between different hazard factors, we have obtained a multi-dimensional discrete joint probability distribution of typhoon hazard factors and constructed a new design wave height that considers the comprehensive effects of typhoon frequency, intensity, and distance. Our results show that the design wave height values of the 50-year, 100-year, and 200-year events are 12.59%, 8.10%, and 3.14% higher than the Gumbel distribution, which is more in line with the distribution of the wave height of waves under severe typhoon conditions. The new model can fully reflect the impact of typhoons on wave height, which can provide a reference for the design safety of marine engineering in the South China Sea. Full article
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26 pages, 11340 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Wave–Current-Induced Liquefaction under Twin Pipelines Using the Coupling Model
by Jiayi Zhang, Lin Cui, Hualing Zhai and Dong-Sheng Jeng
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(7), 1372; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11071372 - 5 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 962
Abstract
Although twin pipelines in series have been used to transport hydrocarbons in engineering practice, most previous studies focused on the dynamic response of the seabed around a single pipeline. A two-way coupling model of fluid–structure–seabed interaction (FSSI) is proposed for the study of [...] Read more.
Although twin pipelines in series have been used to transport hydrocarbons in engineering practice, most previous studies focused on the dynamic response of the seabed around a single pipeline. A two-way coupling model of fluid–structure–seabed interaction (FSSI) is proposed for the study of the soil response and liquefaction caused by waves and currents around twin pipelines. The present model integrates the flow model and the seabed model by introducing a boundary condition of velocity continuity in addition to the continuity of pressures at the seabed surface. Then, the inconsistency between the physical process and numerical simulation can be overcome in the one-way coupling model. Through a series of numerical simulations, the influence of different flow characteristics, soil properties, and pipeline configurations on the seabed response under the two-way coupling process were explored, and compared with the results of the single pipeline. The numerical results indicate that the twin pipeline configuration significantly alters the relevant responses compared to the single pipeline configuration, including the after-consolidation state, amplitude of velocity at the seabed surface, and distribution of pore pressure in the seabed. The parametric studies show that the amplitudes of the wave and current have significant impacts on the distribution of pore pressure in the seabed. The pore pressure in the seabed increases with the increase of forward wave current, while the results of reverse wave current are the opposite. In addition, the liquefaction range around the pipeline increases with the increase of Hw and Tw, and increases with the decrease of Sr and ks. At the same time, the gaps (G) and the ratio of pipe radius (R1/R2) between the twin pipelines also significantly affect the seabed response and liquefaction distribution around the pipeline. Full article
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22 pages, 7161 KiB  
Article
Modeling Impact Load on a Vertical Cylinder in Dam-Break Flows
by Di Mu, Lifen Chen and Dezhi Ning
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(5), 932; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11050932 - 27 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1208
Abstract
A three-dimensional dam-break flow interacting with a vertical circular and square cylinder is studied in this paper using computational fluid dynamics simulations based on OpenFOAM. This resembles closely a tsunami wave and greenwater flow acting on coastal or on-deck structures, which are of [...] Read more.
A three-dimensional dam-break flow interacting with a vertical circular and square cylinder is studied in this paper using computational fluid dynamics simulations based on OpenFOAM. This resembles closely a tsunami wave and greenwater flow acting on coastal or on-deck structures, which are of relevance and importance to coastal protections and offshore operations, respectively. The numerical model is verified by comparing with published experimental measurements and is extended to investigate the effects of the structural geometry and the impacting angle β (i.e., the angle between the water front and cylinders) on the total impact load and the surrounding flow field. It is found that the impact event experiences two distinct stages characterized by a constant flow velocity and a negative flow acceleration, respectively. In addition, the total force on a square cylinder is nearly twice that of a circular cylinder although the impacting area is the same. The longitudinal and transverse forces are found to decrease and increase with the impacting angle, respectively. A close interrogation of the surrounding flow field via flow visualization suggests that the way the flow deflected from the cylinder surfaces plays an important role in determining the pressure field and thus the total force behaviors. Full article
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14 pages, 12312 KiB  
Article
Numerical and Experimental Investigations on Non-Linear Wave Action on Offshore Wind Turbine Monopile Foundation
by Sijia Deng, Ming Qin, Dezhi Ning, Lin Lin, Songxiong Wu and Chongwei Zhang
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 883; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040883 - 21 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1702
Abstract
Monopiles are commonly utilized in offshore wind farms but are prone to non-linear wave loads and run-ups, significantly affecting their engineering design. Therefore, it is crucial to pursue a complete understanding of the non-linear wave action on monopile foundations. Both numerical and experimental [...] Read more.
Monopiles are commonly utilized in offshore wind farms but are prone to non-linear wave loads and run-ups, significantly affecting their engineering design. Therefore, it is crucial to pursue a complete understanding of the non-linear wave action on monopile foundations. Both numerical and experimental investigations on the non-linear wave loads and run-ups on an offshore wind turbine monopile foundation are performed in this paper. The experiment is carried out at a scale of 1/30 in a wave flume at the State Key Laboratory of Coastal and Offshore Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, in which the wave loads and run-ups along the monopile are measured. Based on the second-order potential flow model and time-domain higher-order boundary element method (HOBEM), the related numerical tests are conducted to study the non-linear effects further. It is found that the present non-linear potential theory is sufficient for the simulation of wave force and run-ups on the monopile in the range of wave slope kA < 0.15 before wave breaking. “W” type distribution of wave run-up along the monopile is found, in which the peak value occurs at the frontward side (i.e., θ =180°) and is the maximum due to full reflection; the two symmetrical minimum amplitudes lie in the zones of (45° ≤ θ ≤ 90°) and (270° ≤ θ ≤ 315°), whose positions shift downward with the increase of wave non-linearity. Energy transfer among the fundamental wave component and higher-order components is also found, which is most apparent on the backward side. Besides, the transverse resonance occurs in the wave flume due to the wavelength being near the flume width, which induces the wave run-up at the backward position larger than that at the frontward position. Full article
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17 pages, 2128 KiB  
Article
Integrated Model for Wave-Induced Oscillatory and Residual Soil Response in a Poro-Elastic Seabed: Partially Dynamic Model
by Zhipeng Wan, Lin Cui and Dong-Sheng Jeng
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(4), 833; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11040833 - 15 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1143
Abstract
The evaluation of wave-induced residual pore pressure in a porous seabed and associated seabed liquefaction is essential for designing marine infrastructure foundations. The strength and stiffness of the seabed could be weakened due to the build-up of pore pressures under cyclic wave action, [...] Read more.
The evaluation of wave-induced residual pore pressure in a porous seabed and associated seabed liquefaction is essential for designing marine infrastructure foundations. The strength and stiffness of the seabed could be weakened due to the build-up of pore pressures under cyclic wave action, further leading to residual liquefaction. Existing models for residual liquefaction are limited to the quasi-static uncoupled approaches, which do not account for the effect of oscillatory pore pressure on the accumulative pore pressure acceleration of solid particles, despite the mutual influence of these two mechanisms. To overcome these limitations, this paper proposes a new model for residual soil response with up approximation (partial dynamic model) that couples oscillatory and residual mechanisms. The proposed model is validated through wave flume tests and centrifuge tests. Based on the coupling model, a new criterion of liquefaction integrating both oscillatory and residual mechanisms is also proposed. Numerical examples demonstrate that the coupling effect significantly affects the wave-induced seabed liquefaction potential. Furthermore, a new parameter (Ω) representing the ratio of oscillatory and residual pore pressure is introduced to clarify which mechanism dominates the pore pressure development. Full article
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