Functional Biomaterials and Digital Technologies in Dentistry: From Bench to Bedside—Volume II

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983). This special issue belongs to the section "Dental Biomaterials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 757

Special Issue Editors

Department of Prosthodontics, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China
Interests: implant dentistry; digital dentistry; dental materials; biodegradable metals; additive manufacturing; biomaterials
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Guest Editor
Department of Prosthodontics, Geriatric Dentistry and Craniomandibular Disorders, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, 14197 Berlin, Germany
Interests: dentistry; maxillofacial prosthetics; 3D printing; additive manufacturing; CAD; digitization of education
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of dentistry requires an interdisciplinary approach that integrates the advancements of medicine, materials science and engineering, and computer science. To date, various functional biomaterials have been developed and proposed for oral and maxillofacial applications, due to their excellent biocompatibility, superior mechanical properties, and proper biofunctionality. In addition, advancements in digital technologies for biomaterials have attracted increasing attention. However, the translation process of functional biomaterials and digital technologies from bench to clinic remains extremely challenging.

This Special Issue, entitled “Functional Biomaterials and Digital Technologies in Dentistry: from Bench to Bedside”, aims to provide insight into the recent advances in functional biomaterials and digital technologies. It intends to explore opportunities for basic research, dental education, and the clinical application of biomaterials and digital technologies. The main topics of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following: advanced functional biomaterials (metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites) and digital technologies (CAD/CAM milling, 3D printing, bioprinting, 4D printing, and artificial intelligence) in dental applications.

We invite you to submit a manuscript and present your recent research articles, reviews and communications that reveal the current state of the art and future trends in this field.

Dr. Ping Li
Dr. Alexey Unkovskiy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dental materials
  • digital dentistry
  • metals
  • ceramics
  • polymers
  • CAD/CAM
  • 3D printing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 3439 KiB  
Article
Effect of the Inter-Tooth Distance and Proximal Axial Wall Height of Prepared Teeth on the Scanning Accuracy of Intraoral Scanners
by So-Yeun Kim, Keunbada Son, Soo Kyum Bihn and Kyu-Bok Lee
J. Funct. Biomater. 2024, 15(5), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb15050115 - 25 Apr 2024
Viewed by 534
Abstract
This study aimed to analyze the effect of the height of the proximal axial wall of the prepared tooth and the distance between the adjacent tooth and the prepared tooth on the scan accuracy of intraoral scanners. Ten working casts with maxillary first [...] Read more.
This study aimed to analyze the effect of the height of the proximal axial wall of the prepared tooth and the distance between the adjacent tooth and the prepared tooth on the scan accuracy of intraoral scanners. Ten working casts with maxillary first molars prepared to receive zirconia crowns were randomly obtained from a dental clinic. Each of the 10 casts was scanned using two intraoral scanners (i700; MEDIT and CS3600; Carestream; computer-aided design [CAD] test model, CTM; N = 15 per working cast) 15 times per scanner. Individual dies of the prepared teeth were fabricated, and high-precision scan data were acquired using a laboratory scanner (CAD reference model, CRM; N = 1). CTMs were aligned relative to the prepared tooth of CRMs by using three-dimensional inspection software (Ver 2018.1.0; Control X; 3D Systems). Data were statistically analyzed using an independent t-test and one-way analysis of variance for between-group comparisons (α = 0.05). The inaccuracy in the proximal regions (mesial or distal) of the prepared tooth was higher than that in the buccal and lingual regions (p < 0.05). The scan accuracy was not correlated with the variables when the distance between the adjacent tooth and the prepared tooth was ≥2.0 mm and the height of the proximal axial wall of the prepared tooth was <3.0 mm (p > 0.05). Therefore, an excellent scan accuracy can be obtained using an intraoral scanner when the distance between the adjacent tooth and the prepared tooth is ≥2.0 mm and the proximal axial wall height of the prepared tooth is <3.0 mm. Full article
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