Thyroid Disease in Pregnancy: New Insights in Diagnosis and Clinical Management

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2021) | Viewed by 6786

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The thyroid gland is an important organ that acts as a metabolic regulator of womens health. It is a regulator of metabolism, and its role is important in reproduction and conception. Dysregulation of its function hypothyroidism and/or hyperthyroidism is associated with infertility prior to a subsequent pregnancy. During pregnancy, thyroid disorders may cause first-trimester hemorrhage and anomalies in fetal growth and may affect the neonate in terms of its mental development.

In the current Special Issue, we aim to review the pathogenesis of the prenatal disorders associated with thyroid dysfunction and its management at different times.

Dr. Panagiotis Peitsidis
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Thyroid
  • Pregnancy complications
  • Management
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Hyperthyroidism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 159 KiB  
Editorial
Delivering into the Mounting Evidence of a Probable Link between Maternal Hypothyroidism and Breech Presentation at Term: What Do We Know until Now?
by Panagiotis Peitsidis and Nikolaos Vrachnis
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(5), 1120; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10051120 - 08 Mar 2021
Viewed by 1424
Abstract
Approximately 3–5% of all women at term have a breech baby [...] Full article

Review

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18 pages, 2005 KiB  
Review
Thyroid Hormones and Functional Ovarian Reserve: Systemic vs. Peripheral Dysfunctions
by Marco Colella, Danila Cuomo, Antonia Giacco, Massimo Mallardo, Mario De Felice and Concetta Ambrosino
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(6), 1679; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9061679 - 01 Jun 2020
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 4701
Abstract
Thyroid hormones (THs) exert pleiotropic effects in different mammalian organs, including gonads. Genetic and non-genetic factors, such as ageing and environmental stressors (e.g., low-iodine intake, exposure to endocrine disruptors, etc.), can alter T4/T3 synthesis by the thyroid. In any case, [...] Read more.
Thyroid hormones (THs) exert pleiotropic effects in different mammalian organs, including gonads. Genetic and non-genetic factors, such as ageing and environmental stressors (e.g., low-iodine intake, exposure to endocrine disruptors, etc.), can alter T4/T3 synthesis by the thyroid. In any case, peripheral T3, controlled by tissue-specific enzymes (deiodinases), receptors and transporters, ensures organ homeostasis. Conflicting reports suggest that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, assessed by mean of circulating T4, T3 and Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH), could affect the functionality of the ovarian reserve determining infertility. The relationship between ovarian T3 level and functional ovarian reserve (FOR) is poorly understood despite that the modifications of local T3 metabolism and signalling have been associated with dysfunctions of several organs. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge on the role of TH signalling and its crosstalk with other pathways in controlling the physiological and premature ovarian ageing and, finally, in preserving FOR. We will consider separately the reports describing the effects of circulating and local THs on the ovarian health to elucidate their role in ovarian dysfunctions. Full article
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