Clinical Management of Brain Health in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Anesthesiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 1052

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Medical University of Silesia, 40-055 Katowice, Poland
Interests: intensive care medicine; perioperative medicine; neurocritical care; hemodynamics; sepsis; fluids
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It was a pleasure to collaborate as a Guest Editor in the Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine, entitled “Clinical Management of Perioperarive Brain Health”, which was published in 2021 and contained 6 feature papers (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm/special_issues/Perioperative_Brain_Health). Our goal now is to launch a second edition of the Special Issue, entitled “Clinical Management of Brain Health in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine”, which will cover a broad spectum of problems related to the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of brain health.

Perioperative medicine covers a broad spectrum of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions needed to apply safe anaesthesia and perioperative care. Both functional and structural neurologic injuries represent serious risks of compromised outcomes, with the threats including increased morbidity and mortality and a decreased health-related quality of life among survivors. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in preventive measures and treatment strategies that can be implemented to reduce injury to the brain. Goal-directed therapy has been developed in recent years and is recommended to all subjects at risk of neurologic complications. However, effective neuroprotection and adequate treatment remain in question.

This Special Issue seeks to publish comprehensive high-quality manuscripts on clinical management of perioperative brain health in patients undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgery, as well as in the critically ill. We welcome original research papers, systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and thorough reviews on this interesting topic. We hope that this Special Issue will provide up-to-date data that anesthesiologists and intensive care specialists worldwide can use to improve perioperative brain health techniques.

Prof. Dr. Łukasz Krzych
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • perioperative medicine and the brain
  • prevention and treatment of perioperative neurological complications
  • neurological monitoring
  • perioperative cognitive disorders
  • neurological problems in critically ill
  • brain injury prevention, assessment, and treatment
  • anaesthesia and the developing and aging brain
  • neuroprotection

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Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1438 KiB  
Article
Insights into Hemodynamic Features of Survivors and the Deceased with Acute Brain Injury: A Step Forward Tailored Treatment
by Hanna Miszczenkow and Łukasz Krzych
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(12), 4021; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12124021 - 13 Jun 2023
Viewed by 811
Abstract
Background: Pulmonary artery catheters are widely used for hemodynamical monitoring in critically ill patients. Acute brain injury is among the severe conditions treated in an intensive care unit. The advanced monitoring of hemodynamical parameters, fluid balance and adequate administered treatment based on those [...] Read more.
Background: Pulmonary artery catheters are widely used for hemodynamical monitoring in critically ill patients. Acute brain injury is among the severe conditions treated in an intensive care unit. The advanced monitoring of hemodynamical parameters, fluid balance and adequate administered treatment based on those values are components of goal-directed therapy. Methods: A prospective observational study included adult patients who were hospitalized in the ICU due to acute bran injury, excluding brain oedema after cardiac arrest. Each patient had PAC inserted and hemodynamic data were collected during the first 3 days of the ICU stay every 6 h. Patients were divided into two groups based on the endpoint: the survivors and the deceased. Results: Length of stay in hospital differed between patiens. All patients, regardless of their outcome, had noradrenaline administered. The initial values of PAP differed between the groups (p = 0.05). There were positive correlations noticed between noradrenaline dose, CVP and fluid balance when compared to PCWP in a group of survivors and a positive correlation in the fluid balance when compared to PAP and PVRI. Lactate serum concentrations presented a correlation with the dose of noradrenaline in both groups. Conclusions: Upon acute brain injury, values of PVRI and PAP increase. This is corelated with fluid load and worsened by an excessive fluid treatment in the case of an inconsiderate approach for stabilizing the patient hemodynamically. PAC may present limited advantages in terms of PAP and PVRI control during the treatment. Full article
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