Endoscopic and Robotic Colorectal Surgery: Recent Developments and Emerging Trends

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Gastroenterology & Hepatopancreatobiliary Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2024) | Viewed by 2308

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, "Federico II" University, Naples, Italy
Interests: colorectal surgery; upper GI surgery; surgical oncology; robotics; minimally invasive surgery
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Guest Editor
Department of Advanced Biomedical Sciences, "Federico II" University, Naples, Italy
Interests: colorectal surgery; upper GI surgery; surgical oncology; robotics; minimally invasive surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Medical practice is moving toward precision medicine, and surgery could be considered the standard of care in colorectal disease treatment. In this setting, evidence has been accumulated to consider minimally invasive surgery as the gold standard treatment. In the new era of minimally invasive surgery, some technological advances have revolutionized surgical strategies, improving intraoperative and postoperative results. Above all, robotic surgery, near-infrared technology, 3D reconstruction, and Artificial Intelligence play a fundamental role in the treatment of surgical colorectal disease.

The aim of this Special Issue is to assess the role of the above-mentioned new technologies on colorectal surgery results.

Dr. Marco Milone
Dr. Michele Manigrasso
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • colorectal surgery
  • artificial intelligence
  • robotics
  • indocyanine green
  • precision medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 256 KiB  
Article
Cyanoacrylate in Colorectal Surgery: Is It Safe?
by Anna D’Amore, Pietro Anoldo, Michele Manigrasso, Giovanni Aprea, Giovanni Domenico De Palma and Marco Milone
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(15), 5152; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12155152 - 07 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Anastomotic leakage (AL) of a gastrointestinal (GI) anastomosis continues to be an important complication in GI surgery. Since its introduction more than 60 years ago, Cyanoacrylate (CA) has gained popularity in colorectal surgery to provide “prophylaxis” against AL. However, although in surgical practice [...] Read more.
Anastomotic leakage (AL) of a gastrointestinal (GI) anastomosis continues to be an important complication in GI surgery. Since its introduction more than 60 years ago, Cyanoacrylate (CA) has gained popularity in colorectal surgery to provide “prophylaxis” against AL. However, although in surgical practice it is increasingly used, evidence on humans is still lacking. The aim of this study is to analyze in humans the safety of CA to seal colorectal anastomosis. All consecutive patients from Jannuary 2022 through December 2022 who underwent minimally invasive colorectal surgery were retrospectively analyzed from a prospectively maintained database. Inclusion criteria were a histological diagnosis of cancer, a totally minimally invasive procedure, and the absence of intraoperative complications. 103 patients were included in the study; N-butyl cyanoacrylate with metacryloxisulfolane (Glubran 2®) was used to seal colorectal anastomosis, no adverse reactions to CA or postoperative complications related to inflammation and adhesions occurred; and only one case of AL (0.9%) was recorded. We can consider this study an important proof of concept on the safety of CA to seal colorectal anastomosis. It opens the possibility of starting prospective and comparative studies in humans to evaluate the effectiveness of CA in preventing colorectal AL. Full article

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12 pages, 1949 KiB  
Systematic Review
Robotic Rectal Resection for Rectal Cancer in Elderly Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Rossella Reddavid, Silvia Sofia, Lucia Puca, Jacopo Moro, Simona Ceraolo, Rosa Jimenez-Rodriguez and Maurizio Degiuli
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(16), 5331; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12165331 - 16 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Rectal cancer is estimated to increase due to an expanding aging population, thus affecting elderly patients more frequently. The optimal surgical treatment for this type of patient remains controversial because they are often excluded from or underrepresented in trials. This meta-analysis aimed to [...] Read more.
Rectal cancer is estimated to increase due to an expanding aging population, thus affecting elderly patients more frequently. The optimal surgical treatment for this type of patient remains controversial because they are often excluded from or underrepresented in trials. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the feasibility and the safety of robotic surgery in elderly patients (>70 years old) undergoing curative treatment for rectal cancer. Studies comparing elderly (E) and young (Y) patients submitted to robotic rectal resection were searched on PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Data regarding surgical oncologic quality, post-operative, and survival outcomes were extracted. Overall, 322 patients underwent robotic resection (81 in the E group and 241 in the Y group) for rectal cancer. No differences between the two groups were found regarding distal margins and the number of nodes yielded (12.70 in the E group vs. 14.02 in the Y group, p = 0.16). No differences were found in conversion rate, postoperative morbidity, mortality, and length of stay. Survival outcomes were only reported in one study. The results of this study suggest that elderly patients can be submitted to robotic resection for rectal cancer with the same oncologic surgical quality offered to young patients, without increasing postoperative mortality and morbidity. Full article
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