Dry Eye Disease: Risk Factors, Diagnosis, Treatment and Prevention Measures

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Ophthalmology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2024) | Viewed by 2183

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Optometry and Vision Sciences Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham, UK
2. Ocular Surface Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology, New Zealand National Eye Centre, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: dry eye disease; contact lenses; intraocular lenses; presbyopia; ophthalmic instrumentation; accommodation

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Guest Editor
1. Ocular Surface Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology, New Zealand National Eye Centre, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
2. Optometry and Vision Sciences Research Group, Aston University, Birmingham, UK
3. Centre for Ocular Research and Education, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
Interests: dry eye disease; ocular surface disease; meibomian gland dysfunction; tear film; contact lenses; microbial keratitis; refractive surgery
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dry eyes are a common and debilitating chronic disease, with around one-third of the adult population affected and a growing incidence among children. The Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society Dry Eye Workshops (TFOS DEWS I and TFOS DEWS II) summarized the latest evidence to inform practice, but a lot of research is still needed to inform clinical practice to optimally enhance patients’ quality of life.

This Special Issue aims to showcase some of the latest research on epidemiology (including risk factors) and the diagnosis (including instrumentation/techniques) and management (including predictive markers) of dry eyes. Therefore, we invite original research and state-of-the-art review submissions. In particular, we would like to encourage the submission of manuscripts that will assist clinicians to develop better treatment decision trees to improve the long-term outcome of patients with dry eye disease.

We look forward to your submissions!

Prof. Dr. James J. Wolffsohn
Prof. Dr. Jennifer P. Craig
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • dry eye disease
  • meibomian gland dysfunction
  • epidemiology
  • diagnosis
  • management
  • risk factors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 472 KiB  
Article
A Comprehensive Study on Tear Meniscus Height Inter-Eye Differences in Aqueous Deficient Dry Eye Diagnosis
by Hugo Pena-Verdeal, Jacobo Garcia-Queiruga, Belen Sabucedo-Villamarin, Carlos Garcia-Resua, Maria J. Giraldez and Eva Yebra-Pimentel
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(3), 659; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13030659 - 23 Jan 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Dry eye disease (DED) is a chronic ocular surface condition that requires precise diagnostic tools. The present study aimed to investigate the diagnostic potential of the absolute inter-eye difference (|OD-OS|) in tear meniscus height (TMH) for the detection of the presence [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Dry eye disease (DED) is a chronic ocular surface condition that requires precise diagnostic tools. The present study aimed to investigate the diagnostic potential of the absolute inter-eye difference (|OD-OS|) in tear meniscus height (TMH) for the detection of the presence of aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE). (2) Methods: A sample of 260 participants with dry eye complaints underwent ocular surface examinations thorough diagnostic assessments based on the Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society guidelines (TFOS DEWS II). Participants were subsequently categorized as No ADDE and ADDE based on TMH. Statistical analyses to determine the optimal TMH|OD-OS| cut-off value in a randomly selected study group (200 participants) were performed, while a separate validation analysis of the cut-off value obtained in a random cross-validation group (60 participants) was also performed. (3) Results: The significant diagnostic capability of TMH|OD-OS| (area under the curve = 0.719 ± 0.036, p < 0.001) was found. The identified cut-off value of 0.033 mm demonstrated reliable specificity (77.6%) and moderate sensitivity (59.1%). Cross-validation confirmed the cut-off value’s association with the TFOS DEWS II diagnostic criterion (Cramer’s V = 0.354, p = 0.006). (4) Conclusions: The present study provides evidence for the diagnostic potential of TMH|OD-OS| in identifying ADDE. The identified cut-off value enhances the specificity and offers moderate sensitivity, providing an objective tool for clinical decision making. Full article
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20 pages, 1580 KiB  
Article
The Association of Dry Eye Disease with Functional Visual Acuity and Quality of Life
by Lydia Hui-Peng Tan and Louis Tong
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(23), 7484; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12237484 - 04 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 947
Abstract
Background: Dry eye disease (DED) is a common chronic condition with increasing prevalence. Standard discriminative visual acuity is not reflective of real-world visual function, as patients can achieve normal acuities by blinking. Methods: Participants recruited from a tertiary referral eye centre were divided [...] Read more.
Background: Dry eye disease (DED) is a common chronic condition with increasing prevalence. Standard discriminative visual acuity is not reflective of real-world visual function, as patients can achieve normal acuities by blinking. Methods: Participants recruited from a tertiary referral eye centre were divided into two groups—Severe DED (with significant, central staining) and Mild DED (absence of such staining). Functional Visual Acuity (FVA) in both groups was assessed using the DryeyeKT mobile application and Impact of Vision Impairment (IVI) questionnaire to assess quality of life (QOL). Results: Among the 78 participants (74.4% women), 30 (38.5%) had Severe DED and 48 (61.5%) Mild DED. In women, Severe DED produced a significantly worse FVA of 0.53 ± 0.20 vs. 0.73 ± 0.30 in the Mild DED group (p = 0.006). FVA decreased with increasing age, showing a significant inverse correlation (r = −0.55). A poorer FVA ≤ 0.6 was seen in older patients (68.2 years ± 7.68) vs. an FVA > 0.6 in younger patients (58.9 years ± 10.7), p < 0.001. When adjusting for age, FVA was still 0.107 lower in the Severe DED group, p = 0.003. There was significant difficulty in performing specific daily activities in the Severe DED group, after adjusting for age, gender and FVA. Conclusions: FVA is reduced in severe DED and older people. Severe DED significantly impacts certain aspects of QOL. However, no significant relationship was found between FVA and QOL. FVA is not the only reason for the compromise of health-related QOL in severe dry eye. Full article
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